Armita

  • Origin: Persian آرمیتا
  • Meaning: “holy devotion; creative harmony.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: ar-MEE-tah

The name is derived from the Avestan Ārmaiti which refers to “holy devotion” or “divine creativity.”

In Zoroastrianism, Spenta Armaiti is one of the Amesha Spentas, which emanate from the Ahura Mazda. Later, Spenta Armaiti came to be personified as a divine female being, representing motherly and wifely devotion as well as the earth, she was synchronized with the Armenian goddess Sandaramet.

In the Zoroastrian calendar, the 5th day of the 12th month, which is called Sepandārmazgān, is her holiest day and a festival in honour of women and love was held in her honour.

Armita is used as a female give-name among Persians of all faiths and has been used in India & Pakistan.

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Chobin, Zubin

  • Origin: Persian چوبین
  • Meaning: “javelin-like; spear-like.”
  • Gender: masculine

Chobin was the byname of a 6th-century Sassanian general named Bahram Chobin, so-called due to his tall and thin appearance (hence, “spear-like”). His exploits appear in the 10th-century Persian epic, Shahnameh.

Zubin is the Parsi form.

Other forms include:

  • Chubin چوبین (Old Persian)
  • Zhubin ژوبين

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Khushi

  • Origin: Persian, Hindi خوشی ख़ुशी
  • Meaning: “joy; happiness; mirth; delight.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: (KUSH-shee)

The name is from the Hindi word ख़ुशी which means “joy; delight; mirth; happiness.” It is a borrowing from the Persian word خوشی of the same meaning.

Another transliteration is Kushi.

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Javid, Javed

  • Origin: Persian جاوید
  • Urdu: جاوید
  • Punjabi: : ਜਾਵੇਦ)
  • Meaning: “eternal; immortal.”
  • Gender: masculine

The name is derived from the Persian جاود (Javid), meaning “eternal, immortal.”

The name was borne by Azerbaijani poet and playwrite, Huseyn Javid (Hüseyn Cavid) 1882-1941.

Other forms include:

  • Cavid (Azeri/Turkish)
  • Dzhavid Джавид (Chuvash)
  • Javidi ჯავიდი (Georgian)
  • Yavid (Spanish)
  • Javaid جاوید (Urdu)
  • Jawed جاوید (Urdu)

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Kimia, Kimiya

  • Origin: Persian کیمیا
  • Meaning: “alchemy; rare; unique; elixir.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: KEEM-yaw

The name comes directly from the Farsi word کیمیا (kimia), which originally had a connotation of something rare or unique but later came to form the base word and concept of alchemy. It appears in Persian literature, starting in the 10th-century (CE).

Another spelling is Kimya.

Among the Persian diaspora in Western countries, the name is often shortened to Kim.

Alternately, Kimiya can also be a Japanese male name that changes meaning, depending on the kanji used.

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Masuma

  • Origin: Arabic معصومة
  • Meaning: “innocent; sinless.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: MAH-soo-mah

The name is from the Arabic word meaning “innocent; sinless.” It was the sobriquet of a Shia Muslim saint by the name of Fatimah bint Musa, known as Fatimah al-Masumah (circ. 7th-century CE). She was the daughter of the seventh Twelver Shi’a Imam, Musa al-Kadhim and the sister of the eight Twelver Shia Imam, Ali al-Rida. Her shrine, which is located in Qom, Iran, is an important point of pilgrimage for many Shi’a Muslims.

The name was also borne by Masuma Sultan Begun (d. 1509), the Queen Consort of the Ferghana Valley & Samarkand & the fourth wife of Emperor Babur, founder of the Mughul Dynasty.

A variant transliteration is Massouma.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Məsumə (Azeri)
  • Masoumeh معصومه (Persian)
  • Masume (Turkish)

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Farah

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Arabic
Meaning: “joy”
فرح
Per (fah-RAH); Eng (FAIR-uh)

The name is of Arabic origins but is very popular in Iran and Afghanistan. It is borne by former Empress of Iran, Farah Pahlavi (b. 1938-). She was the first empress to be crowned in Iran since the Arab invasion in the 7th century.

The name was also borne by actress Farrah Fawcett (1947-2009), who claimes that her mother made up the name because it sounded good with her surname.

Currently, Farrah does not rank in the U.S. top 1000, but back in 1977, she was the 177th most popular female name in the United States, which may have been due to current popularity of actress Farrah Fawcett, and also the constant coverage of the Iranian queen of the same name.

As of 2010, Farah was the 56th most popular female name in Bosnia & Herzegovina. Her rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 157 (France, 2009)
  • # 244 (Netherlands, 2010)

The name is used throughout the Middle East and Central Asia.

Other forms of the name include, the Azeri: Fereh and Farakh.

Ava

Gender: Feminine
Origin: German/Persian
Eng (AY-vah); Germ/Per (AH-vah)

This vintagy, two syllable name has risen way up to the US top 10, coming in at # 5 most popular female name in the United States, (2010).

The name was relatively rare before 2000, and came out of nowhere, thanks, no doubt, to such Hollywood trendsetters as Heather Locklear and Reese Witherspoon, both of whom used the name for their daughters in the late 1990s. Both actresses named their daughters in honour of actress, Ava Gardner (1922-1990), whose full name was Ava Lavinia Gardner.

The name has several different origins and meanings, the beloved English counterpart is probably derived from a medieval Frankish name, which was borne in the 9th-century by a saint and the daughter of King Pepin II. In this case, it might be derived from the Germanic element avi meaning “desired.” Other sources have related it to the Frisian awa (water) or from the old Saxon, aval (power).

Another notable bearer is Ava of Melk (1060-1127), a Medieval poetess credited as being the first German language writer. Its recent popularity in German-speaking countries may in part be in tribute to her millennial anniversary and in part to Hollywood.

The name is also a popular Persian female name and is commonly used in Iran and throughout Central Asia. It can either be related to the Persian meaning, “sound, voice” or it may be connected with the Avestan word meaning “first.”

In Ireland and Scotland, it is sometimes used as an anglicized form of Aoife.

Its rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 3 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 6 (Canada, B.C., 2010)
  • # 6 (Ireland, 2010)
  • # 11 (England/Wales, 2010)
  • # 14 (Australia, 2010)
  • # 20 (Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 188 (Germany, 2011)
  • # 246 (France, 2009)
  • # 444 (the Netherlands, 2010)

Bakhchinar

pomegranate-garden5Gender: Feminine
Origin: Persian/Armenian
Meaning: “pomegranate garden.”

The name is composed of the old Persian elements bakhca meaning garden and nar meaning “pomegranate.” The name is also used in Armenia.