Poppy

Gender: Feminine
Origin: English

Are you loving Lily? Maybe the popularity has gotten to you. There is this spunky floral moniker that has already reached outrageous popularity in Great Britain. Poppy is a sweet little floral that has been in usage since at least the 19th century. The name may seem a bit too insubstantial for some, hence is why it is sometimes listed as a nickname for such names as Parthenope, Penelope, Persephone, Pippilotta, Philippa, Pomeline and Perpetua.

The associations with the flower are beautiful! Who wouldn’t want to be named for a deep red, eye popping flower (no pun intended). Then again, its symbolisms with death and sleep can be a bit of a turn off for others.

In Ancient Rome and Greece, the poppy was a funerary flower, they were usually placed on graves. The poppy got the association of death and sleep, since opium, (which is extracted from poppy seeds), was such a strong barbiturate. In fact, it was so strong, that the ancients used it as an anesthetic while conducting surgeries. However, Poppy does have the redeeming qualities of being associated with resurrection, since after being put under a death like sleep from opium during an operation, the patients always seemed to awaken as if they had come back to life. Its symbolism for dead soldiers comes from a poem written by John McCrae, entitled in Flanders Fields (1915). McCrae writes how he witnessed his friend perish amidst a field of poppies during WWI, and he compares the field of poppies to all the fallen dead soldiers. The name could be a nice way to honour a relative that has perished in a war.

As of 2010, Poppy was the 16th most popular female name in England/Wales. Her rankings in other countries are as follows:
  • # 47 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 52 (Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 66 (Australia, NSW, 2010)
In the United States, it doesn’t even rank in the top 1000. However, with its growing popularity in Britain along with its similar appeal to other red hot climbers such as Scarlett and Ruby, she just might be making her way into the top 1000 by next year.
Another interesting side note is that Poppy is the flower of the month of August. Not a bad choice for an August baby.
A famous American bearer is CNN news anchor and reporter, Poppy Harlow (née Katharine) b.1982
Advertisements

Sólja, Sóley

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Faroese/Icelandic
Meaning: “buttercup.”
(SOLE-yah); (SOO-lay).

Both names are derived from the Norse word sol meaning “sun.” In modern vernacular both names are used to refer to the buttercup flower in their own respective languages. Sólja is the Faroese form and Sóley the Icelandic. Though Sóley is used as a given name in the Faroe Islands as well.

As of 2010 Sólja was the 8th most popular female name in the Faroe Islands.

Dahlia, Dalia

Gender: Feminine
(DAHL-yah)

A name with various different meanings and references depending on how you choose to spell it. It is an edgier floral appellation that could overcome a Lily or Daisy any day, as well as a name that can fit into any culture or society. Along with its easy pronunciation and feminine, vivacious sound, the name is pleasing to just about any language on the planet.

If you prefer the Dalia route, then the name can either be Lithuanian, Hebrew or Arabic. If spelled like the flower, the meaning stems from the surname of the botanist who first classified the species, Anders Dahl; Dahl being a common Swedish surname meaning “valley. ”

Dalia by Emily Blivet

Dalia by Emily Blivet

The name could be derived from the Lithuanian word for “fate; luck; lot.” It was the name from the Baltic goddess of weaving, fate and childbirth and she is believed to have been interchangeable with the goddess Laima. The name is still relatively popular in Lithuania, and is currently borne by Lithuania’s President, Dalia Grybauskaitė (b.1956).

The name is also very common in the Middle East. In Israel, it is a more modern Hebrew word name meaning “branch.” In Arabic, it means “grapevine.”

The name is occasionally used in Mexico, where the dahlia is considered the national flower. In fact, the ancient Aztecs used the flower for ceremonial purposes and fashioned its stems into pipes.

Currently, Dalia is the 476th most popular female name in Germany, (2011), and the 969th most popular in the United States, (2010). Its floral counterpart of Dahlia came in as the 650th most popular female name in the United States, (2010).

A possible nickname option is the sweet, yet vintagy Dolly

Kielo

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Finnish
Meaning: “lily of the valley.”
(KEE:eh-lo)

The name comes directly from the Finnish word for the lily of the valley.

The name is borne by Finnish actress Kielo Tommila (b. 1950).

To hear pronunciation by native speakers, listen to: http://www.forvo.com/word/kielo/.

The designated name-day is June 15.

Endzela

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Georgian
Meaning: “snowdrop.”
ენძელა

The name is a fairly common female name in Georgia meaning “snowdrop”as in the flower.

The snowdrop flower is in the Galanthus family and they are among the first flowers to bloom in Spring, some can bloom as late as Autumn and Winter and as the name suggests, are very immune to snow.

Virág

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Hungarian
Meaning: “flower.”
(vee-RAHG)

The name comes directly from the Hungarian word for flower, in 2005, it was the 17th most popular female name in Hungary. Its designated name days are November 26, February 10 and July 29.

Viola, Violet

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Latin
Botanical Name
Eng: VIE-lət, VIE-ə-lət. vaɪˈoʊlə, VIE-oh-LUH

One of the very few floral name to have been in usage since the Middle Ages, Violet is the English form of the French Violette, which was introduced to the English speaking world via the Normans. In England, Violet wasn’t very common till the 19th-century, it has been in prevalent usage in Scotland since the 15oos.Viola is a latinate form that was common in the Middle Ages and appears in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.

Violette was derived from the Old French Violaine which was from the Latin Viola which in itself is derived from the Greek ion and viera meaning “weaving; flexible; sinous.” Violet is also synonymous with the colour purple in most languages and is a shade of purple in English.

Both names have been in and out of vogue in the United States since the 1880s, its peak year was 1910 where it came in at # 79. The name fell out of the top 1000 by the 1960s. In recent years, the name has become more and more fashionable, as of last year, she stands as the 184th most popular female name, meanwhile in Canada, she comes in even higher at # 71.

Ben Affleck and Jennifer Garner named their eldest daughter Violet.

Usually the designated name-day is October 30. The violet is an autumnal flower, depending on the species.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Vjollca (Albanian)
  • Violeta (Bulgarian, German, Lithuanian, Romanian, Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Viola (Czech, English, German, Hungarian, Italian, Latin, Spanish, Swedish)
  • Jolana (Czech/Slovak)
  • Viol (Danish)
  • Jolanda (Slovene/Dutch)
  • Fjóla (Faroese/Icelandic)
  • Viula (Finnish)
  • Violette (French)
  • Iolana (Hawaiian)
  • Jola/Jolán/Jolánta (Hungarian)
  • Viole (Italian)
  • Violetta (Italian)
  • Violanta (Latin/Italian)
  • Violė/Vijolė (Lithuanian)
  • Iolanda/Violante (Medieval Spanish/Portuguese forms)
  • Violaine/Yolande (Old French)
  • Jolanta (Polish: Jola is the diminutive)
  • Wiola/Wioleta/Wioletta (Polish)
  • Vióla/Violétta (Russian/Ukrainian/Icelandic)
  • Vijoleta (Slovenian)
  • Yolanda (Spanish)

There are two Italian male forms: Violo and Violetto

Sirkka

45169252.QET7990IndigoBuntingVertPortGender: Female
Origin: Finnish
Meaning: “bunting; cricket, cotelydon.”
(SEERK-kah)

The name could either be derived from the Finnish word keltasirrku meaning “bunting”, (a type of bird) , or it could be from the Finnish word sirkka, meaning, “cricket.”  It could also be from the Finnish word, sirkkalehti meaning “cotyledon”, which is a type of plant.

Its designated name-day is October 16.

The name is borne by Sirkka Hämäläinen (b. 1939) a Finnish economist and former governor of the Bank of Finland.

Other forms of the name include Sirkku and there is the combined name of Sirkka-Liisa, which is borne by Sirkka-Liisa Anttila (b.1943) a Finnish politician.

Linas

flax_flowers_good_bigGender: Masculine
Origin: Lithuanian
Meaning: “flax”
(LIN-ahs)

The name is fairly popular in Lithuania, the name comes directly from the Lithuanian word for flax, linum usitatissimum, and it could also be a form of the Greek name Linos meaning “comfort song.” In the Lithuanian case, it is most likely that the name has its origins in indigenous Baltic roots. Its feminine forms is Linė (LIN-ay) and Lina (LIN-ah). The name is borne by Lithuanian basketball player Linas Kleiza (b.1985). Its designated name-day is September 23. There is a Spanish form: Lino.

Orvokki, Orvo

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Finnish
Meaning: “violet; pansy.”
(ORR-vok-kee)Orvokki comes directly from the Finnish word for violet or pansy, another offshoot is Orvo. The designated name day is September 13th. To hear how the name is pronounced, go here: http://www.forvo.com/search/Orvokki/