Anil, Anila

Anila is from the Sanskrit आनिल (wind), in Hinduism it is an epithet for the wind God, Vayu. In contemporary India, both names are unisex.

Anıl is a Turkish unisex name meaning “the memory; to be remembered,” in Turkish. Anil is also a popular Albanian & Bosnian male name, while Anila is the feminine form that is exclusively used in Albania & Bosnia.

Anıl appeared in the Top 100 Most Popular Male Names in Turkey between 1990 and 2012, peaking at #51 in 1991.

Sources

Bayram, Bajram

  • Origin: Turkic
  • Meaning: “festival; holiday.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • BY-rahm

The name comes directly from the Turkic word referring to any festival or public holiday, whether religious or secular.

Between 1980-2004, the name appeared in the Top 100 Most Popular Turkish Male Names, and peaked at #42 in 1981.

Sources

Lubomir, Lubomira

  • Origin: Slavic
  • Gender: masculine
  • Meaning: “love & peace.”

Lubomir is composed of the Slavic elements, lubo (love) & mir (peace).

Its Czech form of Lubomír was one of the most popular male names in the Czech Republic between 1935-2006, it peaked at #16 in 1959.

Other forms include:

  • Ljubomir Љубомир Љубомир (Bosnian, Macedonian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovene)
  • Lubomir Любомир (Bulgarian, Polish)
  • Lyubomir Лыѹбомир (Old Church Slavonic, Russian)
  • Lubomierz (Polish)
  • Ľubomír (Slovakian)
  • Lyubomyr (Ukrainian)

Diminutives & Short Forms

  • Ljubiša, Ljubo (Bosnian, Bulgarian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovene)
  • Luboš (Czech)
  • Ljube, Ljupcho, Ljupčo (Macedonian)
  • Ľuboš (Slovakian)

Feminine forms are

  • Ljubomira (Bosnian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovene)
  • Lubomíra (Czech)
  • Lubomira (Medieval Slavic, Polish)
  • L’ubomíra (Slovak)
  • Lyubomyra (Ukrainian)

Sources

Plamen, Plamena

Plamen Пламен (Bulgarian & Serbian) is primarily South Slavic in the contemporary world, but comes from a pan-Slavic word meaning, “flame.” The feminine form is Plamena.

It was potentially Płomień in Medieval Polish. Płamen (male) and Płamena (female) are also modern Polish transliterations of the Bulgarian.

In Bulgaria, the designated name-day is November 8th.

Sources

Rumaysah, Romaïssa

رُمَيْسَة
Photo by Rhyan Stark on Pexels.com

The name seems to be of disputed etymology, but is Arabic in origin. It was the name of Rumaysah bint Milhan known as Umm Sulaym, one of the first women to convert to Islam. Her son was Anas ibn Malik who was one of the companions of the Prophet Muhammed.

The name itself seems to have several meanings attached to it, according to QuranicNames.com, it possibly derives from رُمَيْسَة and mean “wind that scatters like dust.” If spelled رُمَيْثَة (transliterated as Rumaithah) it is the name of a place. It may also be linked with the Arabic root R-M-TH, which can mean “increasing.” Another association is that it is a feminine form of the Arabic male name Rams/Ramth meaning, “raft.”

Other sources have listed it as meaning “bouquet,” but I could not verify this information. If anyone has anymore information regarding the etymology of this name, it would be much appreciated.

Romaïssa (hro-MY-sah) is a North African variation that has been very popular in the Maghreb and in the Maghrebi Diaspora. 

It’s Turkish form of Rümeysa is the 94th most popular female name in Turkey (2019)/

Other transliterated forms include:

  • Romaysa(h)
  • Romeysa
  • Rumaila
  • Rumaisa(h)
  • Rumaitha
  • Rumaysah

Other forms include:

  • Rumejsa (Albanian/Bosnian)
  • Rusejma (Bosnian)
  • Rümeysa (Turkish)
  • Rumeysa (Turkish)
  • Romeesa (Urdu)

Sources

  1. https://quranicnames.com/rumaisah-
  2. https://www.behindthename.com/name/romaissa/submitted
  3. https://www.babynames.co.uk/names/rumaysa/
  4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umm_Sulaym_bint_Milhan
  5. https://www.names.org/n/rumaisah/about#pronunciation
  6. https://muslimnames.com/rumaisah
  7. https://hamariweb.com/names/muslim/arabic/girl/rumaisa-meaning_5822
  8. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umm_Sulaim_bint_Milh%C4%81n
  9. https://www.knjigaimena.com/?znacenje-imena-Rumejsa
  10. http://www.turkstat.gov.tr/PreTablo.do?alt_id=1059

Tariq

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Arabic طارق
Meaning: “morning star; messenger; the knocking one; traveller, path finder.”
طارق

The name is of Arabic origins and can have several different interpretations, one is that it is from the Arabic verb ṭaraqa meaning “to knock” or “to pound.” In this case, the name would take on the meaning of “messenger” or “bringer of news.”

In the Qu’ran, the morning star is named ṭāriq and is described as something that shines and leads the way and in this case, the name can take on the meaning of “someone who leads the way” “traveller” or “pathfinder.”

As of 2010, Tarik was the 2nd most popular male name in Bosnia & Herzegovina, while Tareq is the 8th most popular male name in Libya.

The name was most notably borne by Tariq ibn Ziyad, the Islamic general who helped conquer Spain in the 8th-century.

The name is used by both Muslim and Christian Arabs.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Tarik (Albanian/Bosnian)
  • Tarak/Tarek (Algerian/Lebanese/Moroccan/Tunisian: these are usually the way the name is transcribed in French and hence is most often used in the Francophone world)
  • Tarık (Azeri/Kurdish/Turkish)

The name is also transliterated as Tareq and Tareeq.

Zoran

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Slavonic
Meaning: “dawn.”
Зоран

The name is a masculinized form of the Slavonic female name Zora, which is from the Old Slavonic, meaning, “dawn” and which also was the name of an ancient Slavic goddess, (see Zora for more details).

The name is mainly used in Bosnia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia and Slovenia and as of 2006, he was the 2nd most popular male name in the Republic of Macedonia.

Snezhana

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Croatian/Bulgarian/Serbian/Macedonian/Russian
Meaning: “snow.”
(snyeh-ZHAH-nah)

The name is derived from the Slavonic element sneg, meaning “snow.” Other sources contend that the later part is derived from the word žena meaning woman, however, there seems to be a masculine form that pre-dates the feminine form, Snežan, and in that case, it would be rather unlikely that the suffix is related to žena. Snow White is often transliterated as Snezhana in Bulgarian, Russian and other South Slavic languages. In 2005, it was the 5th most popular female name in Macedonia.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Snezhala (Bulgarian: snyeh-ZHAH-lah)
  • Sniježana/Snježana (Croatian/Slovene: snee-yeh-ZHAH-nah; snyeh-ZHAH-nah)
  • Snježna (Croatian: SNYEHZH-nah)
  • Śnieżka (Polish: very obscure, also a direct translation of Snow White in Polish. SHNYESH-kah)
  • Snezhana Снежана (Russian/Bulgarian/Macedonian/Ukrainian: snyeh-ZHAH-mah)
  • Snežana Снежана (Serbian)
  • Sneža/Snežka/Snežna (Slovene: Sneh-zhah, Snesh-kah, Snezh-nah)
  • Snežanka/Snežica (Slovene: sneh-ZHAHN-kah, sneh-ZHEET-sah)

Southern Slavic masculine forms are: Snežan, Snježko and Snježan.

The designated name-day in Bulgaria is December 14, in other countries, it is August 5.

Sanja

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Bosnian, Macedonian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovene
Meaning: “dream”
(SAHN-yah)

The name is derived from the South Slavic word sanjati meaning “to dream.” Thanks to Capucine for suggesting this name.

The name also has a history of being used as a diminutive form of Alexandra, in recent years, however, the name has exclusively been used as an independent given name due to the fact that it means dream. It currently ranks as the 86th most popular female name in Slovenia. The name is borne by Croatian singer and television host, Sanja Doležal (b.1963), Montengrin Serb singer, Sanja Djordjevic, Croatian-American actress and star of Holes Sanya Mateyash (nee Sanja Matejaš) and Serbian singer, Sanja Maletić (b. 1973).

A masculine form is Sanjin.