January Names

JanuaryI thought at the beginning of each month, I would post a list of names associated with the that particular month. Below is a list of names I have previously written about associated with January

 

Agnes: January 21st is the feast of St. Agnes and according to folklore, on January 20th, which John Keats’ was inspired to write a poem about, unmarried girls are supposed to see a future glimpse of their husband in their dreams the night before, provided they do not eat that day.

Frost: January is often associated with cold temperatures and frosty weather. Here are some name associated with frost

Sarma, Sarmite: These 2 Latvian lovelies come directly from the Latvian word for hoarfrost. The latter is pronounced sar-MEE-teh.

Kirsi: This Finnish female name is associated with the cherry fruit but also means “frost” in Finnish.

Other names that mean “frost” or words for frost from other languages include:

Male

  • Antizgar (Basque)
  • Dér (Hungarian)
  • Hall (Estonian)
  • Reif (German)
  • Rijp (Dutch)
  • Rio (Manx)
  • Šerkšnas (Lithuanian)
  • Sioc (Gaelic)
  • Szron (Polish, SHRONE)
  • Barrug (Welsh)

Female

  • Blancada (Occitanian)
  • Brina (Italian)
  • Bryma (Albanian)
  • Chelata (Aragonese)
  • Geada (Portuguese)
  • Gelada (Catalan)
  • Eláda (Guarani)
  • Escarcha (Spanish)
  • Jinovatka (Czech)
  • Pruina (Latin)
  • Salna (Latvian)
  • Slana (Slovenian)

Snow: Also one of the snowiest months of the year, some names that mean “snow.”

Other names meaning snow that I have yet to write about include

Male

  • Erc’h (Breton)
  • Jur (Chuvash)
  • Kar (Turkish)
  • Lov (Erzya)
  • Nix (Latin)
  • Yas (Navajo)

Female

  • Dëbora (Albanian)
  • Fiòca (Piedmontese)
  • Kavi (Faroese)
  • Neige (French)
  • Neva (Neapolitan)
  • Neve (Galician/Italian)
  • Parsla (Latvian)

Ice, the following are names that mean “ice”

Male

  • Buz (Turkish)
  • Izotz (Basque)
  • Jég (Hungarian)
  • Led (Czech, Serbo-Croatian)
  • Păr (Chuvash)
  • Siku (Inupiak)
  • Ledas (Lithuanian)
  • Ledus (Latvian)
  • Tin (Navajo)
  • Xeo (Galician)
  • Ysbran

Female

  • Cetl (Nahuatl)
  • (Welsh)
  • Ma’ome (Cheyenne)

Epiphany: January 6th officially marks the end of the Christmas season, when the Magi finally were able to locate the Christ child and bestow gifts upon him.

Garnet is the birthstone of January. Below is a list of words from other languages that mean “garnet” and would make awesome names

  • Gernete (Anglo-Norman)
  • Granate (Asturian/Basque/Spanish)
  • Grenat (French)
  • Gairnéad (Gaelic)
  • Granato (Italian)
  • Granatas (Lithuanian)
  • Granada (Portuguese)

Likewise, Carnation is the birthflower, its Latin name is Dianthus, which was a name before it was a flower. Below is a list of words from other languages that mean “carnation” and would make awesome names. Also mixed in are some names with the meaning of “carnation” or just have carnation associations

  • Diantha
  • Clavel (Asturian/Spanish)
  • Krabelin (Basque)
  • Clavellina (Catalan)
  • Havenellike (Danish)
  • Caraveleira (Galician)
  • Landnelke (German)
  • Nellika (Icelandic)
  • Caxtillān (Nahuatl)
  • Penigan (Welsh)

And for boys, other than Dianthus, there is the Italian Garafano

The Chinese plum is the flower emblam for Spring, in Chinese it is called Meihua and its Japanese name is Ume. In Korean it is called Maesil and Vietnamese it is called Mai.

In Japan, the flower emblem for January is the Camellia

Another January birthflower is the snowdrop

  1. Çeçpĕl (Chuvash)
  2. Sněženka (Czech)
  3. Perce-Neige (French)
  4. Endzela (Georgian)
  5. Bucaneve (Italian)
  6. Snieguole (Lithuanian)
  7. Śnieżyczka (Polish)
  8. Sněgulka (Sorbian)
  9. Kardelen (Turkish)
  10. Eirlys (Welsh)

The Zodiac signs associated with January are Capricorn and Aquarius. Capricorn means goat and Aquarius waterbearer. Some names that mean both

The ruling planet of Capricorn and Aquarius is Saturn, so Saturnina or Saturnin/Saturnino are also names to consider.

Finally, here are names that mean “January,” some come directly from words, others are a translation of the Latin male name Januarius.

Male

  • Chinero (Aragonese)
  • Xineru (Asturian)
  • Urtarril (Basque)
  • Genver (Breton/Cornish)
  • Gener (Catalan)
  • Kărlach (Chuvash)
  • Ghjennaghju (Corsican)
  • Leden (Czech)
  • Znêr (Emiliano-Romagnolo)
  • Janvier (French)
  • Zenâr (Friulian)
  • Xaneiro (Galician)
  • Gennaro (Italian)
  • Jenero (Ladino)
  • Januarius (Latin)
  • Sausis (Latvian)
  • Jannar (Maltese)
  • Genièr (Occitanian)
  • Yenner (Pennsylviana German)
  • Janeiro (Portuguese)
  • Bennàlzu (Sardinian)
  • Enero (Spanish)
  • Ocak (Turkish)
  • Lonawr (Welsh)

Female

  • Jenna (Bavarian)
  • January (English)
  • Tammikuu (Finnish)
  • Janvière (French)
  • Gennara (Italian)
  • Januaria (Latin)
  • Zennâ (Ligurian)
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Lien

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Dutch
(LEEN)

The name is a Dutch short form of Carolien, now used exclusively as an independent given name.

As of 2008, Lien was the 61st most popular female name in Belgium.

Coincidentally, Liên is a Vietnamese female name meaning, “lotus.” Pronunced roughly like (LYEN; or LEE-yen). Its Chinese form is Lian.

Rose

Gender: Feminine
Origin: English/French

The name was originally a Norman form of the Germanic name Rohese/Roese, which was composed of the elements hrod meaning “fame” and heid meaning “kind, sort, type.”

The name was revived in the 19th-century by which time it was associated with the flower. In the floral case, the word is derived from the Latin rosa.

Consequently, it is also the word for pink in several European languages.

In the United States, Rose is probably one of the most common middle names given to baby girls, but as a first name, it is rather unusual. Currently, Rose only ranked as the #343rd most popular female name, (2008).

Her rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 92 (Australia, 2008)
  • # 91 (France, 2006)

In the Netherlands, Rosa was the 89th most popular female name (2008); and in Ireland, its vernacular form of Róisin ranked in as the 28th most popular female name, (2008).

Other forms of the name include:

  • Arrosa (Basque)
  • Ruža (Bosnian/Croatian/Slovene: common diminutive is Ružica)
  • Rozenn (Breton)
  • Roza Роза (Bulgarian/Croatian/Serbian/Slovene/Russian)
  • Ruzha Ружа (Bulgarian/Macedonian)
  • Rosa (Catalan/Dutch/English/Finnish/Galician/German/Italian/Portuguese/Romanian/Scandinavian/Spanish)
  • Rosen (Cornish)
  • Růže (Czech)
  • Roos (Dutch/Limburgish/Estonian: ROWS)
  • Roosje (Dutch: originally a diminutive form, occasionally used as an independent given name. RO:-shə)
  • Rohesia (English/Latin: Latinized version of Rohese. ro-HEE-zee-uh; ro-HEE-zhuh)
  • Rose (English/French/Scandinavian)
  • Royse (English: a Medieval Cognate, the name was actually a feminine given name, but due to its associations with Royce, it is often mistaken for a male name)
  • Roosa/Ruusa/Ruusu (Finnish)
  • Roseline (French)
  • Roselle (French)
  • Rosette (French)
  • Rosine (French)
  • Róza (Hungarian)
  • Rozina (Hungarian)
  • Rozita (Hungarian)
  • Rózsa (Hungarian: RO;jaw: Rózsi is the diminutive)
  • Rós (Icelandic)
  • Róis/Róise (Irish-Gaelic)
  • Róisin (Irish-Gaelic: ro-SHEEN; ROSH-een; ROW-sheen)
  • Rosella/Rossella (Italian)
  • Rosellina/Rossellina (Italian)
  • Rosetta (Italian)
  • Rosina (Italian)
  • Rosinella (Italian)
  • Rožė (Lithuanian: ROO-zhey)
  • Róža (Polish: ROO-zhah)
  • Rosita (Spanish: originally a diminutive form, occasionally used as an independent given name)
  • Rhosyn (Welsh)
  • Raisa (Yiddish: RYE-zah)
  • Raisel (Yiddish)

Common Italian compound names include: Annarosa, Mariarosa, Rosangela, Rosanna and Rosamaria.

Common English/French compounds are: Rosanne, Rosemary and Rosemarie.

A common English pet form is Rosie.

Italian masculine forms include: Roso, Rosello, Rosino and Rosetto.

Vernacular forms

These are names found in other languages that literally mean “rose” but which are also not related to the Latin/Germanic form of Rose/Rosa.

  • Qızılgül (Azeri)
  • Gul (Farsi)
  • Vardo (Georgian)
  • Vered וֶרֶד (Hebrew)
  • Mawar (Indonesian)
  • Kolab (Khmer)
  • Kulap (Thai)
  • Gül (Turkish)
  • Hòng (Vietnamese)
  • Huòng (Vietnamese: can also mean pink)

An Armenian masculine form is Vartan.

The name is also borne by a few Catholic saints.

The designated name-days are: August 23 (France), July 2 (Sweden).

Sources

  1. http://www.behindthename.com/namedays/search.php?terms=rosa
  2. http://www.askoxford.com/firstnames/rose?view=uk

Stephen

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Greek
Meaning: ” wreath; garland.”
Eng (STEE-ven); (STEF-en)

The name is derived from the Greek, Στεφανος, (Stephanos), which refers to a wreath or garland worn upon the head, hence, the name is sometimes interpreted to mean “crown.”

As written in the New Testament, it was the name of a deacon who was stoned to death for his beliefs and is regarded as the first Christian martyr.

The designated name-day is December 26.

In the United States, Stephen currently comes in as the 192nd most popular male name, while Steven is the 104th most popular, (2008).

Other forms of the name include:

  • Stefan/Stefaan/Stëven/Stephan (Afrikaans)
  • Shtjefën/Stefan (Albanian)
  • Istfan, إصتفان, ستيف, ستيفن (Arabic)
  • Stepanos/Stepan Ստեփանոս, Ստեփան (Armenian)
  • Tcheunne (Arpetan)
  • İstfan/Stepan (Azeri)
  • Estebe/Eztebe (Basque)
  • Esteve (Bearnais/Catalan/Occitanian/Provençal)
  • Steven (Breton)
  • Stefan Стефан (Bulgarian: Stefcho Стефчо is a diminutive form)
  • Stjepan (Croatian/Serbian: diminutive forms are Stipe and Stipo).
  • Štěpán/Štefan (Czech)
  • Stephen/Stefan/Stephan (Danish)
  • Steven/Stefaan/Stefanus/Stefan/Stephan (Dutch: Stef is a common Dutch diminutive form)
  • Tehvan (Estonian)
  • Sitiveni (Fijian)
  • Tahvo/Teppo (Finnish)
  • Tapani (Finnish)
  • Étienne (French: classic form)
  • Éstienne (French: medieval form)
  • Stéphane (French: more modern form)
  • Steffen (Frisian: used in Germany, Holland, Norway and Denmark)
  • Estevo (Galician)
  • Stefan/Stephan (German)
  • Stephanos Στέφανος (Greek)
  • Kepano/Kiwini (Hawaiian)
  • István (Hungarian: Pisti, Pisto and Isti. 30th most popular male in Hungary, 2008)
  • Stefán (Icelandic)
  • Steephan (Indian)
  • Steafán/Stiofán (Irish: Gaelic)
  • Stefano (Italian)
  • Stefanino/Stefanio/Stenio/Steno (Italian: obscure forms)
  • Stefanus/Stephanus (Latin)
  • Stefans/Stepans/Stepons (Latvian)
  • Steponas/Stepas (Lithuanian)
  • Stefan/Stevan Стефан, Стеван (Macedonian)
  • Stiefnu (Maltese)
  • Tipene (Maori)
  • Šćepan Шћепан (Montenegrin)
  • Stefanu Стефанъ (Old Church Slavonic)
  • Stefan/Szczepan (Polish)
  • Estêvão (Portuguese)
  • Ştefan (Romanian: Fane is a diminutive form)
  • Steivan/Stiafan (Romansch)
  • Stefan/Stiven/Stepan Стефан, Стивен, Степан (Russian)
  • Istevene (Sardinian)
  • Stìobhan/Stìophan/Stèaphan (Scottish: Steenie is a Scotch diminutive form)
  • Stevan Стеван (Serbian)
  • Štefan (Slovak/Slovene)
  • Esteban (Spanish)
  • Stefan/Staffan/Stephan (Swedish: Steffo is a diminutive form)
  • Êtiên (Vietnamese)
  • Stepan ஸ்டீபன் (Tamil)
  • İstefanos (Turkish)
  • Stefan/Stepan Степан, Стефан (Ukrainian)
  • Steffan (Welsh)

Stephanie is a common feminine form, in the United States, she was one of the most popular feminine names between 1972 and 1994. She ranked in at # 6, four years in a row, between the years 1984 and 1987.

As of 2008, she ranked in as the 105th most popular female name. In other countries, her rankings are as follows:

  • # 84 (Australia, 2007)
  • # 488 (the Netherlands, 2008)

Estefanía was the 77th most popular female name in Chile in 2006.

Other feminine forms include:

  • Esteveneta (Bearnais/Occitanian)
  • Štěpánka (Czech)
  • Stefana (Dutch)
  • Etiennette (French: archaic)
  • Stéphanie (French)
  • Stefanie (German/Danish/Dutch: was a very popular name in Germany during the 1980s and 90s. Germ: SHTEH-fah-nee; Dutch (STAY-fah-nee. Steffi is a common German diminutive form.)
  • Kekepania (Hawaiian)
  • Stefánia (Hungarian)
  • Stefania (Italian/Polish/Romanian: Polish diminutive forms are Stefcia and Stefa)
  • Stefanina (Italian: obscure)
  • Stefanella (Italian: obscure)
  • Stenia/Stena (Italian: obscure)
  • Szczepana (Polish)
  • Estèva (Occitanian/Provençal)
  • Štefánia (Slovak)
  • Estefanía (Spanish)

Stevie, Steff, and Steffie are the preferred English diminutives.