Seppe

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Frisian
(SEP-peh)

The name is a Frisian diminutive form of any name beginning with the sieg element (victory).

It is now used exclusively as an independent given name.

As of 2008, it was the 34th most popular male name in Belgium.

Another form of Siebe was the 64th most popular male name in Belgium, (2008).

 

Voitto

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Finnish
Meaning: “victory”

The name comes directly from the Finnish word meaning, “victory.”

The designated name-day is February 14.

Sources

  1. Lempiäinen, Pentti: Suuri etunimikirja. WSOY, 2004.
  2. Vilkuna, Kustaa (toim. Mikkonen, Pirjo): Etunimet. Otava, 2005.
  3. http://www.nordicnames.de/wiki/Voitto
  4. http://www.behindthename.com/name/voitt

Other forms are: Vote and Voti.

Victor, Victoria

Origin: Latin
Meaning: “victory.”

Both names are derived from the Latin, meaning, “victory.”

Victoria is the feminine form of Victorius, but it was also the name of the Roman goddess of Victory, the counterpart of the Greek goddess, Nike.

The name was borne by an early North African Christian martyr, its masculine counterpart, was also borne by several early saints, including three popes.

Victoria did not come into use in the English-speaking world till the 19th-century, when Victoria became queen of the British Empire. This period in history, the Victorian Era, was named in her honour, as were several geographic locations throughout the former British Empire.

Currently, in the United States, Victoria is the 27th most popular female name. Her rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 41 (Belgium, 2006)
  • # 56 (Canada, B.C., 2008)
  • # 28 (Chile, 2006)
  • # 16 (Czech Republic, 2009)
  • # 17 (Denmark, 2009)
  • # 44 (Germany, 2009)
  • # 10 (Hungary, 2008)
  • # 27 Vittoria (Italy, 2006)
  • # 297 (the Netherlands, 2008)
  • # 26 (Norway, 2009)
  • # 2 Wiktoria (Poland, 2008)
  • # 8 (Russia, Moscow, 2007)
  • # 58 (Spain, 2008)
  • # 92 (Sweden, 2009)

As for its masculine counterpart, Victor, was never a popular choice in the English speaking world, but has always been quite common in Latin American countries and on continental Europe. His rankings are as follows:

  • # 15 (Belgium, 2006)
  • # 37 (Chile, 2006)
  • # 45 (Czech Republic, 2009)
  • # 7 (Denmark, 2009)
  • # 270 (Germany, 2009)
  • # 206 (the Netherlands, 2008)
  • # 9 Wiktor (Poland, 2008)
  • # 8 (Sweden, 2009)
  • # 111 (the United States, 2008)

Other forms of Victoria include:

  • Victòria (Catalan)
  • Viktorie (Czech: diminutive form is Viktorka)
  • Viktoria (Danish/German/Swedish)
  • Victoria (Dutch/English/Finnish/German/Norwegian/Romanian/Spanish/Swedish)
  • Vihtoriina (Finnish)
  • Victoire (French)
  • Victorine (French)
  • Viktória (Hungarian/Slovak)
  • Viktorina (Hungarian)
  • Viktoría (Icelandic)
  • Vittoria (Italian)
  • Vittoriana (Italian)
  • Vittorina (Italian)
  • Viktorija Викторија (Latvian/Lithuanian/Serb0-Croatian/Slovene)
  • Wiktoria (Polish)
  • Vitória (Portuguese)
  • Viktoriya Виктория (Russian/Ukrainian)

Common English diminutives include: Vicky/Vicki or Tori. A Romanian short form is Vica. Vicki/Vikki is also used as a short form in the German speaking countries as well as in Scandinavia.

Wiktorka and Wisia are the Polish short forms.

Male variations include:

  • Viktor (Albanian/Czech/Dutch/Finnish/German/Hungarian/Slovak/Swedish)
  • Vítor (Asturian)
  • Viktar Віктар (Belarusian)
  • Victor (Danish/Dutch/German/English/French/Norwegian/Portuguese/Romanian/Swedish)
  • Vittorio (Italian)
  • Victorius (Latin)
  • Viktoras (Lithuanian)
  • Wiktor (Polish)
  • Vítor (Portuguese)
  • Viktor Виктор (Russian/Ukrainian)
  • Víctor (Spanish)

The name was borne by famous French author, Victor Hugo.