Ulrich

Gender: Masculine
Origin: German
Meaning: “power and prosperity.”
Germ (OOL-hreeh); Eng (UL-rick); Swe (OOL-reek)

The name is derived from the Germanic elements, uodal, meaning “heritage” and ric meaning, “power.”

Both the feminine and masculine form have been fairly common in Germanic countries for centuries. It was borne by two German saints and it was also the name of the Swiss Protestant Reformor, Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1431).

Other forms of the name include:

Ulric (Catalan/French)
Oldřich (Czech)
Ulrik (Danish/Dutch/Hungarian/Norwegian/Swedish)
Oldrik (Dutch)
Olerik (Dutch)
Ulric (English)
Ulrich (French/German/Icelandic)
Huldrych/Huldreich (German)
Ódor (Hungarian)
Olderico/Olderigi/Olderigo (Italian)
Udalrico/Udalrigo (Italian)
Uldarico/Ulderico (Italian)
Ulderigo (Italian)
Ullrico (Italian)
Uldis (Latvian)
Ulriks (Latvian)
Odalrich (Old High German)
Ulryk (Polish)
Ulrico (Portuguese/Spanish)
Oldrich (Slovak)
Urh (Slovene)
Uldarico (Spanish)

Uli is a common diminutive form used in Germany, while Ueli is the preferred form used in Switzerland.

Feminine forms include:

Ulrika (Czech/German/Norwegian/Slovak/Swedish)
Ulrike (Danish/German/Norwegian)
Ulrikke (Danish/Norwegian)
Ulla (Finnish/German)
Ulrique (French)
Ulrieke (German)
Ulrira (German)
Ulschke (German)
Ulrica (Italian/Romansch/Spanish)
Ulryka (Polish)

Common German feminine diminutive forms include: Ike, Rieke, Rika, Rike, Riken, Rikerl, Riki, Ule, Uli, Ulla, Ulle, Ulli, Ullie, Ully and Uri.

Its feminine counterpart has been borne by at least one Swedish princess, a fictional character in Walter Scott’s 1819 novel, Ivanhoe and Ulrika Pasch, an 18th-century female Swedish painter.

The designated name-day July 4 in most countries and July 10 in France.

Sources

  1. http://www.behindthename.com/name/ulrich
  2. http://www.behindthename.com/namedays/lists/7.php