Safin, Safana, Safina

Safin سَفِين is an Arabic male name that derives from the Arabic root, S-F-N س ف ن meaning, “ship.” Safin itself is the plural form and therefore means “ships.” The singular form of Safina سَفِينة (ship) is used as a female given-name. Another feminine form, which is Safana سَفّانة, literally meaning “boatwright” in modern Arabic derives from the same root but may have had a connotation of a precious gem or pearl in old Arabic and was also used as a term of endearment for a daughter.

Other forms include: Safeen (masculine), Saffanah (feminine), Safanah (feminine) & Safinah (feminine).

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Jashan

  • Origin: Hindi जशन
  • Meaning: “festivities.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • Pronunciation: JAH-shahn

The name comes directly from the Hindi word जशन meaning, “festivities.”

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Vihana

  • Origin: Sanskrit विहाना
  • Meaning: “dawn; early morning.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • (vee-HAH-nah)

The name comes directly from the Sanskrit word विहान (vihana) meaning, “dawn; early morning.”

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Vyom

  • Origin: Hindi, Sanskrit व्योम
  • Meaning: “space; ether; firmament; heavens; sky.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • Pronunciation: VYOOM

The name comes directly from the Hindi word व्योम (vyom), which means, “space, ether, firmament, sky; heavens.” It is ultimately linked to the Sanskrit व्योमन् (vyoman) of the same meaning.

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Dhyana, Dhyani, Dhyan

Dhyana & Dhyani are unisex (pronounced TAH-nah & TAH-nee), ultimately derived from the Sanskrit ध्यान and meaning “meditation; attention.” Both concepts are applied in Buddhism and Hinduism.

An exclusive masculine form is Dhyan.

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Ajay

  • Origin: Sanskrit
  • Bengali: অজয়
  • Devangari: अजय
  • Gujarati: અજય
  • Hindi/Marathi: अजय
  • Kannada: ಅಜಯ್
  • Malayalam: അജയ്
  • Tamil: அஜய்
  • Telugu: అజయ్
  • Meaning: “invincible; unconquerable.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • Pronunciation: uh-JYE

The name is from the Sanskrit a अ (not) & jaya जय (victory).

The name appeared in the British Top 500 Male Names between 1996-2011, and peaked at #300 in 2003.

Other forms Ajai and Ajit.

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Duha

  • Origin: Arabic ضحى
  • Meaning: “forenoon.”
  • Gender: unisex
  • DOO-hah

The name comes directly from the Arabic word for forenoon or late morning. In Islam, it is used in reference to Salat ad-Duha صَلَاة الضحى‎‎, a voluntary prayer that is said between Fajr and Dhuhr and is used mainly for the atonement of sins.

It is also the name of the 93rd chapter in the Qu’ran, al-Ḍuḥā الضحى‎, (the Morning).

As a given-name, it is traditionally unisex, but has been more often bestowed on females.

Other forms include:

  • Duha Духа (Albanian, Arabic (standard), Bashkir, Bosnian, Chechen, Kazakh, Kurdish, Turkish)
  • Zuha ज़ुहा (Azeri, Hindi)
  • Doha, Dohaa للال چاشت (Bengali, Urdu)
  • Dhuha (Javanese, Malaysian)
  • Zoha ضحی (Persian)
  • Zuho Зуҳо (Tajik, Uzbek)

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Gauri

  • Origin: Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi गौरी
  • Meaning: “fair; light-skinned; white; brilliant.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: GORE-ee

The name comes directly from the Sanskrit word meaning “fair; light-skinned; white; brilliant.” In Hinduism, this is an epithet for the goddess Parvati in her Mahagauri form.

The Kannada and Tamil form is Gowri கௌரி (Tamil) & ಗೌರಿ (Kannada).

Gauri can also be a Finnish male form of the name Gabriel.

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Hansa

The name can have a few origins and meanings. It is primarily an Indian name that comes from the Sanskrit हंस (hamsa), which originally referred to an aquatic bird of passage. The hamsa is described as a mythical bird with knowledge in the Rig Veda and also as the main means of transport for the gods Brahma, Gayatri, Saraswati, and Vishvakarma in Hinduism. In the Ramayana, the hamsa was the bird that carried love letters between Damayanti and Nala. According to Indian legend, arayanna (heavenly hamsa swans) are said to live in the Himalayas where they eat pearls and are able to separate milk from water.

The hamsa bird is also associated with the concept of soham (that I am), as when it is said fast, hamsa starts to resemble soham. The latter is linked with the Brahman, and thus the bird is often associated with the cycle of samsara.

The hamsa bird has also been a popular motif in Indian art for centuries.

Over the centuries, it has interchangeably been translated as a swan, flamingo, goose or duck. It is ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European root word *ǵʰh₂éns, which is also the progenitor of the English word goose, German gans (goose), and the Latin anser (goose).

In India, as a given-name, it is used among all languages groups. The name is primarily used on females but has occasionally been given to males.

The name is also German and Scandinavian female name, being a contracted form of Johanna. Other forms are Hansina and Hansine.

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Anil, Anila

Anila is from the Sanskrit आनिल (wind), in Hinduism it is an epithet for the wind God, Vayu. In contemporary India, both names are unisex.

Anıl is a Turkish unisex name meaning “the memory; to be remembered,” in Turkish. Anil is also a popular Albanian & Bosnian male name, while Anila is the feminine form that is exclusively used in Albania & Bosnia.

Anıl appeared in the Top 100 Most Popular Male Names in Turkey between 1990 and 2012, peaking at #51 in 1991.

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