Paul

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Latin
Meaning: “short; small; humble; few.”
Eng (PAWL)

The name is derived from the Latin Roman family name, Paulus, which could translate as meaning, “small, short; humble; few.”

Paul and his various forms has to be one of the most common male names used throughout the Christian world. It has been used equally among Orthodox Christians, Roman Catholics and Protestants.

Its most famous bearer was Paul of Tarsus, whose real name was Saul. St. Paul, as referred to by the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches, is attributed as being the author of much of the New Testament.

The name was borne by several popes, royals and saints thereafter.

Currently, its Germanic form of Paul is the 8th most popular male name in Germany, (2011). His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 13 (Austria, 2010)
  • # 22 (France, 2009)
  • # 41 (Romania, 2009)
  • # 90 (Ireland, 2010)
  • # 130 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 178 (United States, 2010)
  • # 485 (Netherlands, 2010)
His foreign equivalents rankings are as follows:
  • # 3 (Pablo, Spain, 2010)
  • # 4 (Páll, Faroe Island, 2010)
  • # 4 (Pau, Catalonia, 2010)
  • # 17 (Paweł, Poland, 2010)
  • # 26 (Pablo, Chile, 2010)
  • # 29 (Pavel, Czech Republic, 2010)
  • # 31 (Pablo, Catalonia, 2010)
  • # 44 (Pau, Spain, 2010)
  • # 91 (Pál, Hungary, 2010)
  • # 144 (Pablo, France, 2009)
  • # 202 (Paolo, France, 2009)
  • # 361 (Pablo, United States, 2010)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Pali (Albanian)
  • Paulë (Albanian)
  • Boulos/Bulos بولس (Arabic)
  • Faulus (Aramaic)
  • Boghos Պողոս (Armenian)
  • Poghos Պողոս (Armenian)
  • Paul (Basque/Dutch/English/Estonian/German/French/Romanian/Scandinavian/Silesian)
  • Paweł Павeл (Belarusian/Polish)
  • Polus (Berber)
  • Paol (Breton)
  • Pavel Павел (Bulgarian/Czech/Russian/Slovene)
  • Pavolo (Calabrian)
  • Pavulu (Calabrian)
  • Pau (Catalan/Occitanian)
  • Pawl (Cornish/Welsh)
  • Paulu (Corsican/Sardinian/Sicilian)
  • Pavao (Croatian)
  • Pavle პავლე Павле (Croatian/Georgian/Macedonian/Serbian)
  • Pavo (Croatian)
  • Palle (Danish)
  • Poul (Danish)
  • Pauwel (Dutch)
  • Paavel (Estonian)
  • Paavo (Estonian/Finnish)
  • Páll (Faroese/Icelandic)
  • Paavali (Finnish)
  • Pauli (Finnish)
  • Pol (Flemmish/Romansch)
  • Paale (Frisian)
  • Pals (Frisian)
  • Paulus पौलुस (Frisian/Hindi/Latin)
  • Pay (Frisian)
  • Powles (Frisian)
  • Pouw (Frisian)
  • Pauli (Fruilian)
  • Pódhl (Gaelic)
  • Pól (Gaelic)
  • Paulo (Galician)
  • Pavlos Παυλος (Greek)
  • Pāl पॉल (Hindi)
  • Pál (Hungarian)
  • Pósa (Hungarian)
  • Paolo (Italian/Portuguese)
  • Paolino (Italian/Portuguese)
  • Paulinus (Latin)
  • Pāvils (Latvian)
  • Paulius (Lithuanian)
  • Povilas (Lithuanian)
  • Paol (Lombard)
  • Paulose (Malayalam)
  • Pawl (Maltese)
  • Pawlu (Maltese)
  • Payl (Manx)
  • Paora (Maori)
  • Pål (Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Pavel (Romanian)
  • Paulin (Romansch)
  • Polet (Romansch)
  • Polin (Romansch)
  • Pulegn (Romansch)
  • Pàl (Scots-Gaelic)
  • Pawůł (Silesian)
  • Pavol (Slovak)
  • Pawoł (Sorbian)
  • Pablo (Spanish)
  • Paoro (Tahitian)
  • Pàul (Tuscan)
  • Pavlo Павло (Ukrainian)

For a Reference a Female forms See Paula and Paulina (soon to come)

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Julian

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Latin

The name is an anglicized form of the French male name, Julien, which is derived from the Latin Julianus (See Julius).

In history, the name was borne by the last non-Christian Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th-century CE). It was also borne by a very popular French saint, Julien the Hospitaller.

In Medieval Englian, Julian was a female name and the traditional masculine cognate was Jolyon. Both names went out of usage by the Renaissance and neither were revived until the 19th-century.

Currently, Julian is the 12th most popular male name in Austria, (2010). His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 15 (Germany, 2011)
  • # 17 (the Netherlands, 2010)
  • # 32 (Norway, 2010)
  • # 53 (United States, 2010)
  • # 59 (France, Julien, 2009)
  • # 66 (Belgium, Julien, 2009)
  • # 98 (Sweden, 2010)
  • # 147 (France, Julian, 2009)
  • # 561 (United States, Julien, 2010)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Juljan (Albanian)
  • Julen (Basque)
  • Juluan (Breton)
  • Yulian Юлиан (Bulgarian/Russian/Ukrainian)
  • Julià (Catalan)
  • Julijan (Croatian/Macedonian/Serbian/Slovene)
  • Julian (Dutch/English/German/Occitanian/Polish/Scandinavian)
  • Jolyon (English)
  • Julien (French)
  • Xulián (Galician)
  • Ioulianos Ιουλιανός (Greek)
  • Giuliano (Italian)
  • Iulianus (Latin)
  • Julijonas (Lithuanian)
  • Juliano (Portuguese/Spanish)
  • Julião (Portuguese)
  • Iulian (Romanian)
  • Julián (Spanish)
  • Turiano (Tahitian)

For feminine forms (see Juliana)

Tiare

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Rapa Nui/Tahitian
Meaning: “flower.”
(tee-AH-rey)

The name comes directly from the Rapa Nui word for flower. Rapa Nui is a language spoken on Eastern Island closely related to the other Polynesian languages like Tahitian. In Tahitian, the name means the same thing.

Spelled Thiare (not the correct spelling but the same derivative) the name is the 45th most popular female name in Chile, (2010).

Robert, Robin

Gender: Masculine
Origin: German
Meaning: “bright fame.”

The name is composed of the Germanic elements, hrod (fame) and beraht meaning (bright). In Pre-Norman England, the name existed in the form of Hreodbeorht and was replaced by the now more favored Robert after the Norman Conquest.

The name has been consistently popular in the English-speaking world since. It has been worn by hundreds of notable bearers, including two French kings, three Scottish kings, (Robert the Bruce being one) and several saints.

Currently, Robert ranks in as the 49th most popular male name in the United States, (2008). His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 80 (Canada, B.C., 2008)
  • # 89 (England/Wales, 2008)
  • # 44 (Hungary, 2008)
  • # 49 (Ireland, 2008)
  • # 56 (Scotland, 2009)

Robert has introduced several offshoots, the Medieval English diminutive form of Robin was the name of the protagonist of the legendary Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves. It is also used in Scandinavia and in German-speaking countries.

Its low Germanic counterpart of Rupert was popularized in Austria via an early Christian saint and was later introduced into England by Prince Rupert of the Rhine, a military commander and nephew of King Charles I. The name has enjoyed some usage in England ever since.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Hreodbeorht (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Roupen (Armenian)
  • Roparzh/Roperzh (Breton)
  • Robert Роберт (Catalan/Danish/Dutch/Croatian/Czech/English/Estonian/Finnish/French/German/Polish/Romanian/Russian/Serbian/Slovene)
  • Robrecht (Dutch/Afrikaans: rare, archaic)
  • Rupert (Dutch/English/German/Polish)
  • Robin (English/Finnish/Scandinavian)
  • Roobert (Finnish)
  • Roopertti (Finnish)
  • Robèrto (Fruilian)
  • Roberte (Galician)
  • Robrecht (German: rare, archaic)
  • Rodebrecht/Rotebert (German: rare, archaic)
  • Rudbert/Ruotbert (German: archaic)
  • Ruprecht (German: rare, archaic)
  • Rovēros/Rovértos Ροβῆρος Ροβέρτος (Greek)
  • Röpke (Frisian/Plattdeutsch)
  • Róbert (Hungarian/Icelandic/Slovak)
  • Roibeard (Irish-Gaelic)
  • Robertino (Italian: rare, originally a diminutive form)
  • Roberto (Italian/Portuguese/Spanish)
  • Robertus/Rupertus (Late Latin)
  • Roberts (Latvian)
  • Robertu (Leonese/Sardinian)
  • Robertas (Lithuanian)
  • Raibeart (Scottish Gaelic)
  • Robbetto (Sicilian)
  • Ruperto (Spanish)
  • Ropati (Tahitian)
  • Hopkin/Hopcyn (Welsh: originally a Medieval Welsh diminutive, occasionally used as an independent given name and now more associated with the surname).
  • Robat/Rhobert (Welsh)

Diminutives forms abound, which include: Bob, Bobbie, Rob and Robbie (English), Hob, Dob and Dobby (Medieval English diminutive forms no longer in usage), Rab/Rabbie (Scottish), Robbi (Icelandic), Röbi Swiss German, Robban (Swedish), Robercik/Robuś (Polish), and Roope/Pertti (Finnish).

A common feminine form is Roberta, which is used in English, German, Polish, Italian and Spanish. Common English short forms are Bobbie and Bertie.

A more obscure Italian/Spanish feminine form is Robertina.

Robina is a Renaissance Scots feminine form of Robin.

Name-days are: April 29 (Czech Republic/Germany/Poland), April 30 (France), June 7 (Estonia/Hungary/Poland/Slovakia/Sweden), July 18 (Poland).

Sources

  1. http://www.behindthename.com/name/robert
  2. http://www.askoxford.com/firstnames/robert?view=uk