Fannie, Fanny

Gender: Feminine
Origin: French
Eng (FAN-nee); Fre (fahn-NEE)

While most sources agree that the name may have originally been a diminutive form of Frances, it may have actually started off as a franconized form of the Russian, Faniya, which is a Russian form of the Greek, Phaenna, derived from the Greek, φαεινος (phaeinnos), meaning, “shining.” The name may have been introduced into France via the Ballet Russe. Another possibility is that it is a French contraction of Stephanie.

In the Anglophone world the name has fallen out of usage due to vulgar connotations, in American-English, it is used to refer to the female buttocks while in British-English, it is slang for the female genitalia. This nomer may have developed due to the association of the erotic novel, Fanny Hill also known as Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, by John Cleland, (1748)

The name also appears in Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park as the name of the heroine, Fanny Price (1814)

Fannie and Fanny was at one time a very popular name in the English-speaking world. The highest she ranked in U.S. naming history was at # 47 from 1881-1883. She completely disappeared from the U.S. top 1000 by 1968.

As of 2010, Fanny was the 130th most popular female name in France.

The name is currently borne by French pop-singer, Fanny (b.1979).

The name is also used in Scandinavia.

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Stephen

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Greek
Meaning: ” wreath; garland.”
Eng (STEE-ven); (STEF-en)

The name is derived from the Greek, Στεφανος, (Stephanos), which refers to a wreath or garland worn upon the head, hence, the name is sometimes interpreted to mean “crown.”

As written in the New Testament, it was the name of a deacon who was stoned to death for his beliefs and is regarded as the first Christian martyr.

The designated name-day is December 26.

In the United States, Stephen currently comes in as the 192nd most popular male name, while Steven is the 104th most popular, (2008).

Other forms of the name include:

  • Stefan/Stefaan/Stëven/Stephan (Afrikaans)
  • Shtjefën/Stefan (Albanian)
  • Istfan, إصتفان, ستيف, ستيفن (Arabic)
  • Stepanos/Stepan Ստեփանոս, Ստեփան (Armenian)
  • Tcheunne (Arpetan)
  • İstfan/Stepan (Azeri)
  • Estebe/Eztebe (Basque)
  • Esteve (Bearnais/Catalan/Occitanian/Provençal)
  • Steven (Breton)
  • Stefan Стефан (Bulgarian: Stefcho Стефчо is a diminutive form)
  • Stjepan (Croatian/Serbian: diminutive forms are Stipe and Stipo).
  • Štěpán/Štefan (Czech)
  • Stephen/Stefan/Stephan (Danish)
  • Steven/Stefaan/Stefanus/Stefan/Stephan (Dutch: Stef is a common Dutch diminutive form)
  • Tehvan (Estonian)
  • Sitiveni (Fijian)
  • Tahvo/Teppo (Finnish)
  • Tapani (Finnish)
  • Étienne (French: classic form)
  • Éstienne (French: medieval form)
  • Stéphane (French: more modern form)
  • Steffen (Frisian: used in Germany, Holland, Norway and Denmark)
  • Estevo (Galician)
  • Stefan/Stephan (German)
  • Stephanos Στέφανος (Greek)
  • Kepano/Kiwini (Hawaiian)
  • István (Hungarian: Pisti, Pisto and Isti. 30th most popular male in Hungary, 2008)
  • Stefán (Icelandic)
  • Steephan (Indian)
  • Steafán/Stiofán (Irish: Gaelic)
  • Stefano (Italian)
  • Stefanino/Stefanio/Stenio/Steno (Italian: obscure forms)
  • Stefanus/Stephanus (Latin)
  • Stefans/Stepans/Stepons (Latvian)
  • Steponas/Stepas (Lithuanian)
  • Stefan/Stevan Стефан, Стеван (Macedonian)
  • Stiefnu (Maltese)
  • Tipene (Maori)
  • Šćepan Шћепан (Montenegrin)
  • Stefanu Стефанъ (Old Church Slavonic)
  • Stefan/Szczepan (Polish)
  • Estêvão (Portuguese)
  • Ştefan (Romanian: Fane is a diminutive form)
  • Steivan/Stiafan (Romansch)
  • Stefan/Stiven/Stepan Стефан, Стивен, Степан (Russian)
  • Istevene (Sardinian)
  • Stìobhan/Stìophan/Stèaphan (Scottish: Steenie is a Scotch diminutive form)
  • Stevan Стеван (Serbian)
  • Štefan (Slovak/Slovene)
  • Esteban (Spanish)
  • Stefan/Staffan/Stephan (Swedish: Steffo is a diminutive form)
  • Êtiên (Vietnamese)
  • Stepan ஸ்டீபன் (Tamil)
  • İstefanos (Turkish)
  • Stefan/Stepan Степан, Стефан (Ukrainian)
  • Steffan (Welsh)

Stephanie is a common feminine form, in the United States, she was one of the most popular feminine names between 1972 and 1994. She ranked in at # 6, four years in a row, between the years 1984 and 1987.

As of 2008, she ranked in as the 105th most popular female name. In other countries, her rankings are as follows:

  • # 84 (Australia, 2007)
  • # 488 (the Netherlands, 2008)

Estefanía was the 77th most popular female name in Chile in 2006.

Other feminine forms include:

  • Esteveneta (Bearnais/Occitanian)
  • Štěpánka (Czech)
  • Stefana (Dutch)
  • Etiennette (French: archaic)
  • Stéphanie (French)
  • Stefanie (German/Danish/Dutch: was a very popular name in Germany during the 1980s and 90s. Germ: SHTEH-fah-nee; Dutch (STAY-fah-nee. Steffi is a common German diminutive form.)
  • Kekepania (Hawaiian)
  • Stefánia (Hungarian)
  • Stefania (Italian/Polish/Romanian: Polish diminutive forms are Stefcia and Stefa)
  • Stefanina (Italian: obscure)
  • Stefanella (Italian: obscure)
  • Stenia/Stena (Italian: obscure)
  • Szczepana (Polish)
  • Estèva (Occitanian/Provençal)
  • Štefánia (Slovak)
  • Estefanía (Spanish)

Stevie, Steff, and Steffie are the preferred English diminutives.