Ilgar

Agsu, Azerbaijan: winter scene - snow at Chanlibel restaurant - photo by N.Mahmudova courtesy of TravelImage.com

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Azeri Ильгар
Meaning: “first snow.”

The name comes directly from the Azeri meaning, “first snow.”

As of 2010, it was the 9th most popular name among the general male population in Azerbaijan.

It is sometimes transliterated as Ilqar and the feminine form is Ilgara.

Snow Day! Snow Names

Was your baby a snow baby? Born on a snow day? Or perhaps you are just curious to see if here are any names with the meaning of “snow; ice or blizzard.”

As part of the holidays and in honour of the snow rich winter season, I have compiled a list of “snowy” “icy” baby names. Enjoy!

Male

Alluaq “hole in the ice for fishing” (Greelandic)
Andri “snow shoe” (Old Norse)
Anil “wind” (Sanskrit)
Aputsiaq “snowflake” (Greenlandic)
Edur“snow” (Basque)
Fannar “snow drift” (Icelandic)
Frediano “cold” (Italian)
Frosti “frost” (Icelandic)
Govad “the wind” (Persian)
Hjarnar “hard; frozen snow” (Old Norse)
Ilgar “first snow” (Azeri)
Isbert “bright ice” (Frisian)
Isbrand “ice sword” (Frisian)
Izo “ice” (Frisian)
Izozts “ice” (Basque)
Jouko “snow; ice” (Finnish)
Persoq “snow flurry” (Greenlandic)
Pyry “blizzard” (Finnish)
Sarmis “snowfrost” (Latvian)
Sheleg “snow” (Hebrew)

Female

Biruta “snow” (Lithuanian)
Bora “snow” (Albanian)
Dëborake “snow” (Albanian)
Drífa “snowdrift” (Icelandic)
Edurne “snow” (Basque)
Eira “snow” (Welsh)
Eirlys “snowflake” (Welsh)
Elurreta “snowing” (Basque)
Ensilumi “snowfall” (Finnish)
Era “wind” (Albanian)
Esen “the wind” (Turkish)
Fanndís “snow goddess” (Icelandic)
Flykra “snow flake” (Faroese)
Fulga “snowflake” (Romanian)
Fönn “lots of snow” (Icelandic)
Gheata “ice” (Romanian)
Gwyneira “white snow” (Welsh)
Haizea “wind” (Basque)
Halla “frost” (Finnish)
Helbe/Helve “flake” (Estonian)
Himani “snow” (Sanskrit)
Hófehérke “snow white” (Hungarian)
Hukupapa “frost” (Maori)
Ishild “ice battle” (German)
Ilgara “first snow” (Azeri)
Jökla “icicle; glacier” (Icelandic)
Kassoq “bluish piece of ice” (Greenlandic)
Koyuki “little snow” (Japanese)
Kukiko “child of the snow” (Japanese)
Lumi “snow” (Finnish)
Miyuki “silent snow” (Japanese)
Mjöll “fluffy snow” (Icelandic)
Neus “snow” (Catalan)
Neves “snows” (Portuguese)
Nieves “snows” (Spanish)
Nilak “fresh water ice” (Greenlandic)
Pärsla “flake” (Latvian)
Patil “snowflake” (Armenian)
Pire “snow” (Mapuche)
Qinoq “ice sludge'” (Greenlandic)
Tuyét “snow” (Vietnamese)
Sarma/Sarmite “snowfrost” (Latvian)
Shilga “snow” (Hebrew)
Snezhana “snow” (Bulgarian/Croatian/Russian)
Snezhala “snow” (Bulgarian)
Sniedze (Latvian)
Snöfrid “snow peace; snow beauty” (Old Norse)
Snædís “snow goddess” (Icelandic)
Snieguolė “little snow” (Lithuanian)
Śnieżka “little snow” (Polish)
Taidi “snow white” (Estonian)
Tuuli “wind” (Finnish)
Yukiko “snow child” (Japanese)

Biruta, Birutė

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Lithuanian
Meaning: “snow.”
Lith (bih-ROO-tay); Pol (bee-ROO-tah).

Birutė is a classic Lithuanian name which is believed to be associated with the Lithuanian word, byrančiu, meaning, “snow.”

In Lithuanian history, the name was borne by the wife of Grand Duke Kęstutis of Lithuania and the mother of Vytautas the Great (d. 1382)

In Lithuania, Birutė is considered a sort of folk heroine, a lot of legends have been attributed to her, one being that Birutė was a vaidilutė or priestess of the gods who guarded the sacred fire. It is believed that Kęstutis kidnapped and married her against her will. After her death, she was made into a sort of pagan folk saint. In 1989, archeological evidence suggested that she had a sanctuary dedicated to her on a hill in Palanga, now named Birutė Hill, it is considered the highest dune in Palanga.

The form of Biruta was also ocassionally used in Poland.

A Lithuanian masculine form is Birutis.

The designated name-days are February 5 (Lithuanian) and November 24 (Poland).

Snieguolė

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Lithuanian
Meaning: “snowdrop.” literally “little snow”
(snye-GWOH-lay)

The name is derived from the Lithuanian sniegas meaning “snow”/the suffix of uolė is a common Lithuanian feminine suffix denoting smallness.

In Lithuanian, this is also the name for Snow White and it is the name for the snowdrop flower.

Its designated name-day is January 15.

Snae Names

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Icelandic/Faroese
Meaning: “snow.”

There are several Icelandic feminine names that carry the snae- element which is derived from the Icelandic word for snow. These are the following:

Snæbjörg

The name is composed of the elements, snae meaning “snow” and björg meaning either “rock” or “help; aid.”

As of 2007, 11 women in Iceland bore this as a first name and 8 had it as a middle name.

The Faroese version is Snæbjørg.

Snæbjört

Composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and björt meaning “bright; clear; shining.”

As of 2007, only five women bore this as a first name and five women had it as a middle name.

Snæborg

Composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and borg meaning either “town; city” or “castle” or “shelter” or “rocky hill.”

As of 2007, only 3 women in Iceland had this as a first name and one had it as a middle name.

Snæbrá

Composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and brá meaning “brow; eyebrow” or “eyelash.”

As of 2007, only one person bore this as a first name and one had it as a middle name.

Snædís

Composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and dís meaning “goddess; fairy; nymph.”

As of 2007, 169 women bore this as a first name, while 34 had it as a middle name.

Snæfríður

The name is composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and fríður meaning “pretty.”

The Faroese form is Snæfríð.

As of 2007, 63 women in Iceland bore this as first name and 9 had it as a middle name.

Snælaug

The name is composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and laug meaning “hot spring; bath.”

Its Faroese form is Snæleyg.

As of 2007, nobody in Iceland had this as a first name or as a middle name.

Snærós

The name is composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and rós meaning “rose.”

As of 2007, 5 women bore this as a first name and 2 had it as a middle name.

Snærún

The name is composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and rún meaning “rune.”

As of 2007, 4 women had this as a first name and one had it as a middle name.

Fönn

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Icelandic
Meaning: “snow; snowdrift.”

The name is derived from the Icelandic words, fannar and fannir, meaning “snow” or “snowdrift.”

As of 2007, only 4 women in Iceland bore this as a first name, and 42 had it as a middle name.