Gabriel, Gabriella

Origin: Hebrew גַבְרִיאֵל  Γαβριηλ
Meaning: “strong man of God.”
Eng (GABE-ree-el); (gah-bree-EL-ah); Fre (gah-bree-EL); Germ (GAHP-ree-el); Pol (GAHP-ryel)

The name is derived from the Biblical Hebrew, גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri-el) meaning, “strong man of God.”

In Judeo-Christian religions, it is the name of a powerful archangel, who is often viewed as a messenger of God. He appears several times in the Old and New Testaments.

Among Christians, one of his most important messages was relayed to the Virgin Mary that she would be the mother of Jesus. Islamic tradition also believes the same, and in Islam, it was the angel Gabriel who revealed the Qu’ran, (through God), to Mohammed.

In Mormon theology, Gabriel is believed to be the embodiment of Noah in the afterlife.

Gabriel is a fairly common name among Christians, Jews and Muslims, making him an extremely cross-cultural portable name.

Currently, in the United States, his popularity has been rising. He is the 24th most popular male name, (2011). In other countries, his rankings in all his various forms are as follows:

  • # 2 (Gabriel(e), Liechtenstein, 2010)
  • # 3 (Brazil, 2011)
  • # 4 (Romania, 2009)
  • # 6 (Gabriele, Italy, 2009)
  • # 7 (France, 2010)
  • # 9 (Quebec, Canada, 2011)
  • # 19 (Croatia, 2009)
  • # 26 (Belgium, 2008)
  • # 28 (Canada, BC, 2010)
  • # 28 (Mexico, 2010)
  • # 29 (Austria, 2010)
  • # 35 (Spain, 2010)
  • # 40 (Poland, 2009)
  • # 47 (Sweden, 2011)
  • # 48 (Norway, 2011)
  • # 52 (Catalonia, 2010)
  • # 78 (England/Wales, 2010)
  • # 95 (Australia, NSW, 2011)
  • # 124 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 189 (Djibril, France, 2010)
  • # 313 (Jibril, France, 2010)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Jibrail/Jibrīl جبرائيل ጂብሪል (Arabic/Ethiopian)
  • Gabriel გაბრიელი ገብርኤል
    (Armenian/Catalan/Coptic/Czech/Danish/English/Ethiopian/Finnish/French/Georgian/German/Norwegian/Polish/Portuguese/Romanian/Romansch/Spanish/Swedish)
  • Gavrik (Armenian)
  • Cəbrayıl/Cibril (Azeri)
  • Gawryil Гаўрыіл (Belarusian)
  • Džibril/Džebrail (Bosnian)
  • Gavrail Гавраил (Bulgarian)
  • Zheberejil Жәбірейіл (Central Asian)
  • Gabrijel (Croatian/Maltese/Serbian)
  • Gabriël (Dutch)
  • Gaabriel (Estonian)
  • Gabrel (Ethiopian)
  • Kaapo/Kaapro (Finnish)
  • Gabriél Γαβριήλ (Greek)
  • Gavril Γαβριηλ (Greek)
  • Gavriel גַּבְרִיאֵל (Hebrew)
  • Gábriel (Hungarian)
  • Gábor (Hungarian)
  • Gabríel (Icelandic)
  • Jibril (Indonesian)
  • Gaibriéil (Irish-Gaelic)
  • Gabo/Gabbo (Italian)
  • Gabriele (Italian: more common form)
  • Gabriellino (Italian)
  • Gabriello (Italian)
  • Gabrio (Italian)
  • Cibrayîl (Kurdish)
  • Gabrielus (Latin)
  • Gabriels (Latvian)
  • Gabrielius (Lithuanian)
  • Jibrail (Malaysian)
  • Gavriilu Гаврїилъ (Old Church Slavonic)
  • Khabbriele (Puglian)
  • Gabin (Provençal)
  • Gavril Гавриил (Romanian/Russian)
  • Crabiele/Gabilele/Gabriello (Sardinian)
  • Cabbrieli (Sicilian)
  • Gabri’el ܠܒܪܝܐܝܠ (Syrian)
  • Gebrael (Syrian)
  • Cebrâîl (Turkish)
  • Gavrel גַאבְֿרֶעל (Yiddish)

English short form is Gabe.

Its feminine form of Gabriella/Gabriela is also rising in popularity. Currently, Gabriella is the 34th most popular female name in the United States, (2011). Her rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 3 (Gabriela, Bulgaria, 2009)
  • # 5 (Gabrielė, Lithuania, 2011)
  • # 5 (Gabrielle, Philippines, 2011)
  • # 7 (Gabriela, Columbia, 2011)
  • # 8 (Gabriela, Romania, 2009)
  • # 9 (Gabriela, Puerto Rico, 2011)
  • # 10 (Gabriela, Brazil, 2010)
  • # 13 (Gabriela, Poland, Warsaw, 2010)
  • # 19 (Gabriela, Poland, 2009)
  • # 28 (Gabrijela, Croatia, 2009)
  • # 30 (Gabriela, Mexico, 2010)
  • # 30 (Gabrielly, Brazil, 2010)
  • # 36 (Gabriela, Croatia, 2009)
  • # 38 (Gabriela, Chile, 2010)
  • # 64 (Australia, NSW, 2011)
  • # 64 (Gabriela, Spain, 2010)
  • # 67 (Gabrielle, France, 2010)
  • # 72 (Canada, BC, 2010)
  • # 94 (Gabrielle, Canada, BC, 2010)
  • # 119 (Gabrielle, United States, 2011)
  • # 466 (France, 2010)

Other feminine forms include:

  • Gebre’elwa ገብርኤሏ (Amharic/Ethiopian)
  • Gabriela (Bulgarian/Croatian/Czech/German/Polish/Portuguese/Romanian/Scandinavian/Slovak/Spanish)
  • Brielle (Cajun: abbreviated form of Gabrielle)
  • Gabrijela (Croatian/Serbian)
  • Gabriëlle (Dutch)
  • Briella/Briela (English)
  • Gabrielle (French/English)
  • Gabria (Italian)
  • Gabrielina (Italian)
  • Gabriella (Italian/English/Hungarian/Scandinavian: more common form in Italy)
  • Gabrielė (Lithuanian)
  • Gavriila Гавриила (Russian)

Czech diminutives are: Gába, Gabika, Gábina, Gabrina and Gabby.

A Polish diminutive is Gabrysia (gah-BRIH-shah).

English short forms are: Gabby and Ella.

Designated name-days are: February 10/27 (Poland), February 19 (Sweden), March 24 (Czech/Finland/Poland/Slovakia/Sweden), September 29 (France/Germany), December 12 (Hungary)

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Eva, Eve

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Hebrew
Meaning: “life.”
Eng (EEV); (EE-vuh); Germ/Sp/Pol (EV-ah)

The name is borne in the Bible and in the Quran by the first woman created by God. She and her husband were expelled from the Garden of Eden after eating from the Tree of Knowledge.

The name is believed to be derived from the Hebrew roots חַוָּה, Ḥavvāh, from the Hebrew root ḥāyâ meaning “life” and the Semitic element, ḥyw “to live.” Both the Hebrew word chavah meaning “to live” and chayah meaning “to breath” share the same root.

Despite Eve’s fall from Grace in the Bible, the name was always in usage among Jewish, Christian and Muslim communities. In England, its usage can be traced back to the 12th-century. Its Latinate form of Eva, has always been a classic in continental Europe, especially in Germany, Poland, Slovakia and the Czech Republic.

As of 2010, Eva was the most popular female name in the Faroe Islanda and in Slovenia. Eve, Eva and all her various forms’ rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 3 (Iceland, 2010)
  • # 4 (French-speaking, Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 5 (Netherlands, 2010)
  • # 7 (Ieva, Lithuania, 2010)
  • # 10 (Armenia, 2010)
  • # 10 (Evie, England/Wales, 2010)
  • # 14 (Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 15 (France, 2009)
  • # 17 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 20 (Belgium, 2009)
  • # 24 (New Zealand, 2010)
  • # 26 (Australia, NSW, 2010)
  • # 29 (Croatia, 2010)
  • # 31 (Evie, Scotland, 2010)
  • # 33 (Evie, Australia, NSW, 2010)
  • # 37 (England/Wales, 2010)
  • # 44 (Eevi, Finland among Finnish-speakers, 2010)
  • # 44 (Ireland, 2010)
  • # 46 (Austria, 2010)
  • # 47 (Canada, BC, 2010)
  • # 48 (Spain, 2010)
  • # 55 (Catalonia, 2010)
  • # 55 (Éabha, Ireland, 2010)
  • # 56 (Eve, Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 59 (Eve, Ireland, 2010)
  • # 86 (Norway, 2010)
  • # 91 (United States, 2010)
  • # 92 (Eve, England/Wales, 2010)
  • # 99 (Eve, Australia, NSW, 2010)
  • # 201 (Eve, France, 2009)
  • # 589 (Eve, United States, 2010)
  • # 705 (Evie, United States, 2010)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Eva Ева ევა
    (Afrikaans/Albanian/Armenian/Basque/Belarusian/Bosnian/Catalan/Croatian/Czech/Dutch/Faroese/French/Frisian/Galician/Georgian/German/Icelandic/Italian/Portuguese/Romansch/Spanish/Scandinavian)
  • Evis (Albanian)
  • Mahalet/Mahlet (Amharic)
  • Hawa حواء Хауа (Arabic)
  • Yeva (Armenian)
  • Həvva (Azeri)
  • Yeva Ева Эва (Belarusian/Russian/Ukrainian)
  • Yevga Евга (Belarusian)
  • Hava (Bosnian)
  • Evy (Danish/Norwegian/Swedish: initially a diminutive form, occasionally used as an independent given name)
  • Eveke (Dutch: initially a diminutive form, used as an independent given name, EV-eh-ke)
  • Eve (English/Estonian/Walon)
  • Evie (English)
  • Hawat/Hewa (Egyptian/Coptic)
  • Eeva (Estonian/Finnish)
  • Eevi (Estonian/Finnish)
  • Evi (Estonian)
  • Ivi/Iivi (Estonian)
  • Iivika (Estonian)
  • Ève (French)
  • Eefje, Eefke (Frisian)
  • Hawwa ሕይዋን (Ge-ez)
  • Eua Ευα (Greek)
  • Chava חַוָה (Hebrew: Modern: KHAH-vah, gutteral CH sound)
  • Éva (Hungarian: AY-vaw, diminutive form is Évike)
  • Hawa (Indonesian/Malayalam)
  • Éabha (Irish-Gaelic)
  • Ieva (Latvian/Lithuanian: YEH-vah)
  • Evuzus (Malaysian)
  • Aaue (Manx)
  • Èva (Occitanian)
  • Ewa (Polish: EH-vah, diminutive forms are Ewka, Ewunia and Ewusia)
  • Evá (Sami)
  • Evelia (Spanish)
  • Evita (Spanish)
  • Eba (Tagalog)
  • Havva (Turkish)
  • Efa (Welsh)

Italian masculine form is Evo.

Traditionally, in most European countries, the name-day for Adam and Eve is December 24.

Anastasia

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Greek
Meaning: “resurrection.”
Eng (an-ne-STAY-zha); (ah-na-STAH-zee-a)

The name is derived from the Greek masculine name, Anastasios (Αναστασιος), which is from the Greek (anastasis) αναστασις the word for resurrection.

The name was popularized in the Orthodox Christian world by an early Christian marytr of Dalmatia, revered as the patron saint of weavers. It is borne by several other saints as well.

Usually, the name is bestowed upon children born around the Easter season, currently, Anastasia is one of the most popular female names in Russia and in other former Soviet countries. Its rankings are as follows:

  • # 1 (Belarus, 2011)
  • # 1 (Moldova, 2008)
  • # 1 (Ukraine, 2010)
  • # 2 (Russia, 2011)
  • # 3 (Estonia, 2011)
  • # 3 (Latvia, 2011)
  • # 5 (Georgia, 2011)
  • # 12 (Kazakhstan, 2010)
  • # 364 (United States, 2010)
  • # 461 (France, 2009)

In the English-speaking world, the name was occasionally used in the Middle Ages in its archaic English forms of Anastice or Anstice (AN-ne-stis); (AN-stis). It was never very common and was only re-introduced into the English-speaking world via Eastern European immigrants in the United States starting in the late 19th-century.

In the Western World, the name is most famously associated with the youngest daughter of the Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, who was rumored to have survived the massacre of her family.

The designated name-days are: December 25 (Germany/Poland), December 22 (Greece), January 4 (Russia), February 4 (Russia), February 27 (Poland), April 15 (Czech Republic/Hungary/Poland), April 30 (Slovakia), August 17 (Poland) and November 11 (Lithuania/Poland/Russia).

Other forms of the name include:

  • Anastasiya Анастасия (Bulgarian/Russian/Ukrainian: a-nah-stas-SEE-ya)
  • Anastàsia (Catalan)
  • Anastasija Анастаија Анастасія (Belorusian/Croatian/Latvian/Lithuanian/Macedonian/Serbian/Slovene)
  • Asja (Croatian/Bosnian)
  • Anastazie (Czech)
  • Anastázie (Czech: ah-nah-STAHZ-ye)
  • Anastasia ანასთასია (Dutch/English/Estonian/Galician/Georgian/German/Greek/Italian/Romanian/Scandinavian/Spanish)
  • Anastasie (French: a-na-stah-ZEE)
  • Anastace/Anstice (English: archaic)
  • Nastassja (German/Rusyn)
  • Anasztázia (Hungarian)
  • Nasztázia (Hungarian)
  • Neszta (Hungarian)
  • Anastasía (Icelandic)
  • Nastachu Настачи (Mari)
  • Nastasu Настаси (Mari)
  • Anastazja (Polish: a-na-STAHZ-yah)
  • Nastazja (Polish)
  • Anastásia (Portuguese)
  • Anna Staschia (Romansch)
  • Staschia (Romansch)
  • Stasia (Romansch)
  • Anastázia (Slovak)

Czech/Slovak diminutives are: Anaska, Anastazka, Anastázička, Anuška, Nasťa, Nastička, Nastík, Staci, Stasa, Staska, Stáza, Stázi, Stazinka, Tazia.
English short forms are: Ana, Annie, Stacey and Tacey.
Greek diminutives are: Natasa, Sia, Tasia , Tasoula.
Polish diminutives are: Ania, Anka, Nastka, Nastusia, Stasia, Staska, Tusia.
Russian diminutives are: Anya, Asya, Nastasya, Nasten’ka, Nastya, Nastyona, Nastyuha, Stasya

Masculine forms include:

  • Anastas Анастас (Bulgarian/Russian)
  • Anastazije (Croatian)
  • Anastáz/Anastásius (Czech)
  • Anastasius (Dutch/Latin)
  • Staas (Dutch: originally a diminutive form, used as an independent given name)
  • Anastasio (Galician/Italian/Spanish)
  • AnastasiosΑναστάσιος (Greek: Modern)
  • Anasztáz (Hungarian)
  • Anastazy (Polish)
  • Anastasi (Romansch)
  • AnastasiyАнастасий (Russian/Ukrainian)

Sources

  1. http://www.behindthename.com/name/anastasia
  2. http://www.askoxford.com/firstnames/anastasia?view=uk

Arsenius

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Greek
Meaning: “virile.”
(are-SEE-nee-us)

The name is a Latinized form of the Greek male name, Arsenios Αρσενιος. The name was borne by a 5th-century Greek saint.

Its Central Asian form of Arsen Арсен is currently the 21st most popular male name in Kazakhstan, (2010).

Other forms of the name include:

  • Arsen Արսեն Арсен (Albanian/Armenian/Azeri/Bashkir/Bosnian/Chechen/Chuvash/Circassian/Croatian/Czecg/Georgian/Kazakh/Kyrgyz/Ossetian/Slovak/Slovene/Tatar/Tajik/Turkmen/Uzbek)
  • Arseniu (Asturian)
  • Arseni Арсений არსენი (Bulgarian/Catalan/Georgian/Russian/Ukrainian)
  • Arsène (French)
  • Arsenios (Greek)
  • Arzén (Hungarian)
  • Arsenio (Italian/Portuguese/Spanish)
  • Arsenijs (Latvian)
  • Arsenijus (Lithuanian)
  • Arsenije Арсеније (Macedonian/Serbian)
  • Arseniusz (Polish)
  • Arsenie (Romanian)

Russian diminutives include:

  • Arsenyushka
  • Arsya
  • Ars
  • Arsyuta
  • Arsyusha
  • Asya
  • Senya
  • Syusha

Anna, Anne

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Biblical Hebrew
Meaning: “grace.”
(ANN; AHN). (ANN-uh; AHN-nah). (HANN-uh; HAHN-nah)

Anne is possibly one of the quintessential classic English and French female names. Prior to the 18th-century, it seems that every other girl born in England was either named Anne, Jane or Mary. There were several British and French queens who bore this simplistic moniker, including the ill fated Anne Boleyn, the mother of Elizabeth I. The history of Anne is rather long and complicated.

It was foremost popularized through the cult of St. Anne, a legendary figure who was said to be the mother of the Virgin Mary and the grandmother of Christ.

In Brittany, the name became especially popular because it happened to coincide with the name of an ancient Celtic goddess, her cult being replaced by St. Anne’s. In fact, it was borne by one Breton Princess, Anne of Brittany.

The name was introduced into Britain by the French-Normans after the invasion in 1066. Previously, there had been a minor Saxon king named Anna, but in this case the name is related to the Saxon arn (eagle). Anna and Anne are still occasionally used as male given names in Friesland.

Other than the apocryphal saint, the name Anne can be traced directly back to the Bible. In the New Testament, it is the name of a prophetess who predicts the Crucifixion of Christ.

Anna (Αννα), is the Greek translation of the early Hebrew Channah חַנָּה, usually transliterated as Hannah, meaning “grace.”

Hannah is borne in the Old Testament by the faithful mother of the prophet, Samuel.

Hannah has always been popular among Jewish families, but was virtually unheard of among non-Jews before the Reformation, except in some cases where it may have been used as a diminutive form of Johanna, spelled Hanna.

It was the Byzantines who had introduced the Anna form to the world, making it popular throughout Eastern and Southern Europe. It was a very popular name among the Byzantine royal family and it was borne by the majestic Anna of Byzantium.

Anna may be the more melodic form of the bunch, but Anne’s minimalistic qualities are charming. Short, to the point, no frills. It’s not a bad name, though it does lack some spice, which is why parents are probably more attracted to its more exotic alternatives. In fact, Anne only comes in at # 608 in the top 1000 female names of the United States. It is safe to say, however, that she is very much loved in the middle name spot.

Anna is currently one of the most popular female names in Europe and abroad. Her rankings are as follows:

  • # 1 (Austria, 2010)
  • # 1 (Estonia, 2011)
  • # 2 (Hungary, 2010)
  • # 3 (Ana, Georgia, 2010)
  • # 3 (Iceland, 2010)
  • # 4 (Ana, Croatia, 2010)
  • # 4 (Czech Republic, 2010)
  • # 4 (Germany, 2011)
  • # 4 (Ukraine, 2010)
  • # 5 (Faroe Islands, 2010)
  • # 5 (Ana, Portugal, 2010)
  • # 6 (Armenia, 2010)
  • # 6 (Ane, Greenland, 2002-2003)
  • # 6 (Ana, Romania, 2009)
  • # 6 (Ana, Serbia, 2010)
  • # 7 (Latvia, 2011)
  • # 7 (Russia, 2011)
  • # 8 (German-speaking Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 9 (Denmark, 2011)
  • # 10 (Netherlands, 2010)
  • # 10 (Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 10 (Norway, 2010)
  • # 11 (Italy, 2010)
  • # 12 (Ireland, 2010)
  • # 14 (Poland, 2010)
  • # 16 (Catalonia, 2010)
  • # 26 (Canada, B.C., 2010)
  • # 28 (Italian-speaking Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 28 (United States, 2010)
  • # 29 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 40 (France, 2009)
  • # 46 (French-speaking Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 53 (Belgium, 2009)
  • # 63 (England/Wales, 2010)
  • # 71 (Australia, 2010)
  • # 81 (Sweden, 2010)
  • # 83 (Spain, 2010)
Other forms of the name include:
  • Anneen (Afrikaans/Low German)
  • Anna Анна (Afrikaans/Albanian/Armenian/Breton/Bulgarian/Catalan/Corsican/Czech/Dutch/English/Estonian/Faroese/Finnish/French/Frisian/German/Greek/Hungarian/Icelandic/Italian/Latvian/Limburgish/Maltese/Polish/Russian/Ukrainian/Scandinavian/Slovak)
  • Anne (Basque/Dutch/English/French/Scandinavian)
  • Gánna Га́нна (Belarusian)
  • Annaig (Breton)
  • Annick (Breton)
  • Maina (Breton)
  • Mannaig (Breton)
  • Mannick (Breton)
  • Naig (Breton)
  • Ana Ана ანა (Bulgarian/Croatian/Galician/Georgian/Lombard/Macedonian/Portuguese/Romanian/Samogaitian/Serbian/Slovene/Spanish/Venetian)
  • Jana (Croatian/Ladino)
  • Aneta (Czech/Polish/Samogaitian/Slovak)
  • Aina (Catalan)
  • Anica (Croatian/Serbian/Slovene)
  • Ane (Danish)
  • Anika (Danish)
  • Anneke (Dutch)
  • Anneken (Dutch)
  • Annika (Dutch/Finnish/German/Latvian/Scandinavian)
  • Anka (Dutch/Frisian/German)
  • An(n)ke (Dutch/Frisian)
  • Anouk (Dutch/French)
  • Ans (Dutch)
  • Enneke (Dutch)
  • Enneken (Dutch)
  • Anita (English/German/Polish/Spanish)
  • Annette (English/French/German)
  • Anissa (English)
  • Annelle/Annella (Estonian)
  • Anete (Estonian/Latvian)
  • Anett (Estonian)
  • Anu (Estonian)
  • Anni (Finnish)
  • Annikki (Finnish)
  • Anniina (Finnish)
  • Annukka (Finnish)
  • Niina (Finnish)
  • Anaïs (French/Provençal)
  • Annouche (French)
  • Ninette (French)
  • Ninon (French)
  • Ninouk (French)
  • Anje (Frisian)
  • Ankea (Frisian)
  • Antje (Frisian)
  • Antjen (Frisian)
  • Anute (Fruilian)
  • Anano (Georgian)
  • Annchen (German)
  • Annel (German)
  • Annele (German/Latvian)
  • Anneli(e) (German/Finnish/Swedish)
  • Annet (German)
  • Anina (German)
  • Anja (German/Slovene)
  • Anouschka (German/Italian/Russian)
  • Annaki (Greek)
  • Annoula (Greek)
  • Noula (Greek)
  • Anikó (Hungarian)
  • Annuska (Hungarian)
  • Panni (Hungarian)
  • Áine (Irish)
  • Ánna (Irish)
  • Annarella (Italian)
  • Annella (Italian)
  • Annetta (Italian)
  • Annettina (Italian)
  • Nona (Italian/Romansch)
  • Ance (Latvian)
  • Annija (Latvian)
  • Anninya (Latvian)
  • Ona (Lithuanian)
  • Annamma (Malayalam)
  • Annam (Malayalam)
  • Onnee (Manx)
  • Âone (Norman)
  • Aenna/Aenne (Old High German)
  • Annehe (Old High German)
  • Änna/Änne (Old High German)
  • Neta (Piedmontese)
  • Noto (Piedmontese)
  • Anke (Plattdeutsch)
  • Anneke(n) (Plattdeutsch)
  • Analia (Romansch/Spanish)
  • Annina (Romansch)
  • Annotta (Romansch)
  • Anca (Romanian)
  • Anicuta (Romanian)
  • Anėta (Samogaitian)
  • Anėkė (Samogaitian)
  • Annag (Scottish)
  • Ghianna (Sicilian)
  • Janna (Sicilian)
  • Nanna (Sicilian)
  • Anniken (Swedish)
  • Ann (Welsh)
  • Nan (Welsh)
  • Nanno (Welsh)
  • Nanw (Welsh)
  • Aana (Wolof)
As for the Hannah forms

Hanna without an H is the prefered form on Continental Europe, usually pronounced (HAHN-nah) and in French like Anna. Hanna and Hanne (HAHN-neh) are also used as diminutive forms of Johanna/Johanne in the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Germany. There is the Hungarian Hajna pronounced (HOY-no). The Czech/Slovak form of Hana nickname Hanka. There are the Yiddish forms of Heyna, Hayna, Hejna (all pronounced like HAY-nah) including the diminutive forms of HenaHende, Hendel and Henye.  The Polish diminutive form of Hania, which might make an interesting alternative to Anya or Hannah. Hannah, Hanna and Henna are all used in the Middle East.

Of course, how could we ever forget the popular diminutive forms of Annie and Nan.

Theodore

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Greek
Meaning: “god’s gift.”

The name is derived from the Greek Theodoros (Θεοδωρος) which is composed of the elements θεος (theos) meaning “god” and δωρον (doron) “gift.” The name was borne by several early saints, two popes and three tsars of Russia.

In recent American history the name was borne by President Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) of whom the Teddy Bear was named for.

It is currently the 263rd most popular male name in the United States, (2010).

An interesting fact: Dorothy is derived from the same Greek roots but in reverse order.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Tewodros ተውዶሮስ (Amharic)
  • Tadros تادرس (Arabic: used among Arab Christians)
  • Todos ܛܘܕܘܫ (Aramaic: used among Assyrian and Chaldean Christians)
  • Hvejdar Хведар (Belarusian)
  • Teodor Теодор (Bulgarian/Catalan/Croatian/Czech/Danish/Estonian/Finnish/Hungarian/Polish/Romanian/Scandinavian/Slovakian/Slovene/Ukrainian)
  • Todor (Bulgarian/Serbiab/Northern Greek)
  • Theirn (Cajun)
  • Theodoor (Dutch)
  • Theodorus (Dutch/Latin)
  • Theodore თევდორე (English/Georgian)
  • Tuudor (Estonian)
  • Teuvo (Finnish)
  • Théodore (French)
  • Theodor (German)
  • Theodoros Θεόδωρος (Greek)
  • Thodoros Θόδωρος (Greek)
  • Fedor (Hungarian)
  • Tivadar (Hungarian)
  • Tódor (Hungarian)
  • Téodóir (Irish)
  • Teodoro (Italian/Portuguese/Spanish)
  • Todaro (Italian)
  • Teodors (Latvian)
  • Thei (Limburgish)
  • Teodoras (Lithuanian)
  • Toše Тоше (Macedonian)
  • Tiodore (Occitanian)
  • Toader (Romanian)
  • Tudor (Romanian/Welsh)
  • Fedor Федор (Russian/Slovene)
  • Fjodor Фёдор (Russian)
  • Teodoru (Sicilian)
  • Fedja (Slovene)
  • Todor (Slovene)
  • Fedir Федір (Ukrainian)
  • Tewdwr/Tudur (Welsh)
Common diminutives include:
  • Tosho Тошо (Bulgarian)
  • Toshko Тошко(Bulgarian)
  • Ted/Teddy (English)
  • Tedo თედო (Georgian)
  • Fedja Федя (Russian)

Its feminine form of Theodora was very popular in Byzantium, it was borne by at least five Byzantine Empresses including Empress Theodora who is also revered as a saint.

Other feminine forms include:

  • Teodora Теодора თეოდორა (Bulgarian/Catalan/Crotian/Georgian/Italian/Macedonian/Polish/Portuguese/Romanian/Serbian/Slovene/Spanish/Swedish)
  • Todorka Тодорка (Bulgarian/Macedonian)
  • Theodora Θεοδώρα (Czech/English/German/Greek)
  • Theda (English/German)
  • Théodora (French)
  • Teodóra (Hungarian)
  • Fedora Федора (Russian/Slovene)
  • Feodora Феодора (Russian)

Daria, Darius

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Persian
Meaning: “riches, he possesses.”
ENG də-RIE-əs, DER-ee-əs, DAR-ee-əs.

The name is derived from the ancient Persian male name Dārayavahush which is composed of the elements dâraya (to possess) and vahu (good). The name was borne by several early Persian kings including Darius the Great. The name also appears in the Old Testament.

As a given name it was never popular in the English-speaking world but a very common one on Continental Europe, especially Eastern Europe due to the fact that it was borne by several Greek saints, both male and female (in the form of Daria).

Currently, Darius is the 341st most popular male name in the United States, (2010).

Other forms of the name include:

  • Daryj Дарый (Belarusian)
  • Darij Дарий (Bulgarian/Ukrainian)
  • Darios (Catalan)
  • Darijo (Croatian)
  • Darius (Czech/English/French/German)
  • Dareius (German)
  • Dareios Δαρείος (Greek)
  • Dárius (Hungarian/Slovakian)
  • Dariush/Daryush  داریوش (Iranian)
  • Dario (Italian/Portuguese)
  • Darijus (Lithuanian)
  • Dariusz (Polish. DAHR-yoosh)
  • Dа́rij Да́рий (Russian)
  • Darío (Spanish) 

A Polish diminutive form is Darek.

Its feminine counterpart of Daria is extremely popular in Eastern Europe, she is currently the 36th most popular female name in Poland (2010).

Her rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 1 (Belarus, 2010)
  • # 2 (Moscow, Russia, 2010)
  • # 4 (Estonia among Russian-speakers, 2010)
  • # 5 (Ukraine, 2010)
  • # 10 (Romanian, 2010)

It was borne by an early Greek Christian saint and martyr.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Darja (Belarusian/Czech/Estonian/Latvian/Slovene)
  • Dària (Catalan)
  • Tárie Та́рие (Chuvash)
  • Daria Дарья (Croatian/Italian/Macedonian/Polish/Romanian/Russian)
  • Darija Дарія (Croatian/Lithuanian/Serbian/Ukrainian)
  • Darinka (Croatian/Slovene)
  • Tarja (Finnish)
  • Darie (French)
  • Dareia Δαρεια (Greek)
  • Dária (Hungarian)
  • Dariella (Italian)
  • Taira Тайра́ (Mari)
  • Darjana (Slovene)
  • Darjanka (Slovene)
  • Darjenka (Slovene)
  • Daría (Spanish)

Diminutive forms include:

  • Daruška (Czech)
  • Dasia (Polish. DAH-shah)
  • Dasha (Russian/Ukrainian)
  • Darijna  Дарина (Ukrainian)
Source

Cyrus

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Persian

The name is found in History and in the Old Testament as the name of one of the most powerful leaders who ever lived, Cyrus the Great (c. 600 BC or 576 BC–530 BC). He was a conqueror of the Babylonians and who, according to the Bible, freed the captive Jews, allowing them to return to their homeland. It is also borne by several other Persian kings.

Cyrus, in its Persian form, has always been a popular male name in Iran. In the English-speaking world, it did not catch on until after the Protestant Reformation. Currently, Cyrus is the 488th most popular male name in the United States, (2010). The name is commonly used among Iranian-Americans, due to it being such a classic name in Iran and the fact that it is easily translatable to English.

As for its etymology, general consensus agrees that it may derive from the ancient Persian elements khor (sun) and vash (likeness). However, the noted linguist, Karl Hoffman (1915-1996), argued that it is based on an Indo-European root meaning “to humiliate.”

Other forms of the name include:

  • Kores (Afrikaans)
  • Kyowros Կյուրոս (Armenian)
  • Ciru (Asturian)
  • Kir Кир (Azeri/Belarusian/Bosnian/Bulgarian/Croatian/Kyrgyz/Polish/Russian/Rusyn/SerbianUkrainian)
  • Kuir (Basque)
  • Ziro (Basque)
  • Kirus (Breton)
  • Cir (Catalan/Occitanian)
  • Kýros (Czech/Icelandic/Slovak/Slovene)
  • Cyrus (Dutch/English/French/Latin/Polish/Romanian)
  • Kyros Κυρος (Estonian/German/Greek/Scandinavian)
  • Kyyros (Finnish)
  • Cyr (French)
  • Syrus (Frisian)
  • Cíoras (Gaelic)
  • K’iros კიროს (Georgian)
  • Koresh כּוֹרֶשׁ (Hebrew)
  • Círus/Cýrus (Hungarian)
  • Kurus (Hungarian)
  • Cirino (Italian)
  • Ciro (Italian. CHEE-ro)
  • Cirotto (Italian)
  • Kurushi Куруши (Kyrgyz)
  • Kûruşê (Kurdish)
  • Kīrs (Latvian)
  • Kyras (Lithuanian)
  • Kurusy (Malay)
  • Kurush/Kourosh کوروش‎ (Persian)
  • Ciro (Spanish/Portuguese. SEE-ro; THEE-ro)
  • Kiros (Turkish)
The designated name-days are: January 31 (Poland) and September 12 (Poland).
The name has several feminine offshoots, including Cyra, (Eng. SY-rah), which was a popular female name during the Byzantine empire and the Russian, Kira (KEER-ah). Kira  is currently the 90th most popular female name in Hungary, (2010) and the 308th most popular in the United States, (2010). Other feminine forms include:
  • Kira Кира (Bulgarian/German/Hungarian/Latvian/Polish/Russian/Ukrainian)
  • Cyra (English/Latin/Polish)
  • Kiira (Estonian/Finnish)
  • Kyra (Greek/English)
  • Kíra (Hungarian)
  • Cira (Italian/Spanish)
  • Cirina (Italian)
The designated name-days for Kira are: March 10 (Latvia), March 12 (Russia), July 7 (Poland), October 12 (Latvia). November 7 (Estonia).
Source

Moses

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Debated
Meaning: debated

The name is borne in the Old Testament and in the Qu’ran by the a renowned prophet and law giver, who according to tradition was placed in a basket by his Hebrew mother and found by the daughter of Pharaoh (in Judeo-Christian religion) or the wife of Pharaoh (in Islamic tradition) and raised as an Egyptian prince. It is from this tradition that the name is believed to be derived from the Hebrew element משה (mšh) as stated in  Exodus 2:10:

“[…] she called his name Moses (משה): and she said, Because I drew him (משיתהו) out of the water.” (KJV).

 

It has been suggested that the name is in fact of Egyptian origins, being related to the Coptic elements, mo (water) and uses (saved; delivered) hence: “saved from the water.” Another suggestion is the Egyptian element, ms (child; born) as found in such ancient Egyptian male names as Tuth-Mose and Ram-messes.

The name has always been common among Jews, Muslims and Orthodox Christians, but did not catch on in the English-speaking world until after the Protestant Reformation. Medieval Jews of England used the Middle English form of Moss.

It is currently the 509th most popular male name in the United States, (2010).

Other forms of the name include:

  • Moses (Afrikaans/English/German/Scandinavian/Welsh)
  • Moisiu (Albanian)
  • Musa موسى Муса (Amharic/Arabic/Azeri/Bosnian/Kabyle/Swahili/Tatar/Turkish)
  • Moisen (Aragonese)
  • Movses Մովսես (Armenian)
  • Moises (Basque)
  • Majsjej Майсей (Belarusian)
  • Moizez (Breton)
  • Moisej Моисей (Bulgarian)
  • Moisès (Catalan)
  • Moisije Мојсије (Croatian/Serbian)
  • Moše (Croatian)
  • Mojžíš (Czech/Slovak)
  • Mozes (Dutch)
  • Mooses (Estonian/Finnish)
  • Móses (Faroese/Icelandic)
  • Moïse (French)
  • Maois (Gaelic)
  • Mose მოსე (Georgian/German/Romansch/Swedish)
  • Mouses Μωυσης (Greek)
  • Moshe מֹשֶׁה (Hebrew/Ladino)
  • Mózes (Hungarian)
  • Mosè (Italian)
  • Müsa Мұса (Kazakh)
  • Mosa (Kurdish)
  • Mûsa (Kurdish)
  • Moyses (Latin)
  • Mozus (Latvian)
  • Mozė (Lithuanian)
  • Мојсеј (Macedonian)
  • Moss (Middle English)
  • Moïses (Occitanian/Provençal)
  • Mojżesz (Polish)
  • Moisés (Portuguese/Spanish)
  • Moise (Romanian)
  • Moisej Моісей (Rusyn/Ruthenian)
  • Moiséj Моисе́й (Russian)
  • Muozė (Saimogaitian)
  • Mojzes (Slovene)
  • Muuse (Somalian)
  • Mojsej Мойсей (Ukrainian)
  • Moosõs (Voro)
  • Moishe (Yiddish)
Recently, actress Gwyneth Paltrow bestowed this name on her second child, Moses Bruce Anthony Martin (b. 2006)
Sources