Wilbert

Boy_bishop


  • Origin: German
  • Meaning: “bright will.”
  • Gender: masculine

The name is composed of the Old German elements will (will, desire) & beraht (bright). It was borne by a 9th-century bishop of Cologne and a 9th-century Bishop of Sherborne, England.

Wilbert appeared in the U.S. Top 1000 between 1880 & 1990 and peaked at #160 in 1920.

Recent notable bearers include English children’s author of Thomas the Tank Engine Fame, Wilbert Awdrey (1911-1997) & American singer & songwriter, Wilbert Harrison (1929-1994).


Wilbert is also used in German-speaking countries, French-speaking countries (now rare), the Netherlands and in the Scandinavian countries.

Other forms include:

  • Willibert (German)
  • Willabertus (Late Latin)

Common English short forms are Wilby, Will & Willy.


Sources

Zadoc, Zadok

Cornelis_de_Vos_-_The_Anointing_of_Solomon

  • Origin: Hebrew צָדוֹק
  • Meaning: “righteous; just.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • Eng (ZAD-uk)

The name is from the Hebrew meaning “just; righteous.” It is borne by 5 characters in the Old Testament, most notably Zadok the High Priest during the reign of King David & King Solomon.

The name has always been used among Jews but came into use among Protestant Christians mainly in the 18th-century.

Zadok the Priest is a hymn written by Handel which was first played at King George II’s coronation and has been played at every coronation in the British monarchy since.


Other forms include:

  • Zädock (Bavarian German)
  • Sadok Садок (Bulgarian, Croatian, Polish, Russian, Scandinavian)
  • Sádoch, Sádok (Czech)
  • Zadok (Dutch, Finnish, German, English, Scandinavian)
  • Sadoq (French)
  • Sádók (Hungarian)
  • Sadoc (Italian, Latin, Spanish)
  • Haroko (Maori)
  • Tzadok (Modern Hebrew)
  • Zadoque (Portuguese)
  • Ţadoc (Romanian)
  • Cadok Цадок (Ukrainian)

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Jomar, Jómarr

https___cdn.cnn.com_cnnnext_dam_assets_151127104048-icelandic-horses-7


  • Origin: Old Norse
  • Meaning: “famous horse.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • YOH-mar

The name is composed of the Old Norse elements, jór (horse) and marr (famous).

The name has recently become common in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

Other forms include:

  • Jómar (Icelandic)
  • Jomar (Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish)

Sources

Uziel, Uzziel

Uzziel


  • Origin: Hebrew
  • Meaning: “God is my strength; God is my power.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • (uh-ZYE-el; OOZ-ee-el)

The name is composed of the Hebrew עֹז (‘oz) meaning “strength, power” and אֵל (‘el) meaning “God.”

It is borne by a few minor characters in the Bible, including the grandson of Levi and the father of Mishael, Elzaphan, and Zithri, the uncle of Aaron, Moses & Miriam.

In the apocryphal Enoch 3, Uziel is the name of a fallen archangel, more often referred to as Uzza. The same archangel is referenced as such in some versions of the kabbalistic text, Sefer Raziel HaMalakh, Johannes Trithemius’ Steganographia; and in John Milton’s Paradise Lost.

In Talmudic Jewish tradition, it was the name of the father of Jonathan Ben Uzziel, one of the 80 tannaim who studied under Hillel the Elder.

Among Medieval Jews, the name was rare among Ashkenazi Jews but very common among Sephardis & Middle Eastern Jews.

In the English-speaking world, the name is seldom used but has recently become common in Spanish-speaking countries.

A recent notable bearer was Uziel “Uzi” Gal (born Gotthard Glas) (1923-2002), a German-born Israeli gun designer best known for his invention of the “uzi.”


Other forms include:

  • Uciel (Albanian)
  • Usiheel (Bavarian German)
  • Oziil Озиил (Bulgarian)
  • Oziel Οζιηλ (Biblical Greek)
  • Ozihel (Biblical Latin)
  • Uziel (Croatian, Czech, French, Italian, Modern Hebrew, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish)
  • Uzziël (Dutch)
  • Usiel (Finnish, French, German)
  • Huziel, Ouzziel (French)
  • Huzziél (Hungarian)
  • Uzielis (Lithuanian)
  • Utiere (Maori)
  • Ussiel (Norwegian, Swedish)
  • Uziil Узиил (Russian)
  • Ziel (Yiddish)

Sources

Deianeira

Deianeira_and_the_dying_centaur_Nessus_1888


  • Origin: Greek Δηιανειρα, Δῃανειρα
  • Meaning: “slayer of man; husband slayer.”
  • Gender: Female
  • (DAY-a-NEER-ah; DIE-yah-NEER-ah)

The name is composed of the Greek elements δηιοω (deioo) & ανηρ (aner) meaning “man.”

The name is most notably borne in Greek mythology by the wife of Hercules who was tricked by the Centaur of Nessus into believing his poisoned blood would cure Hercules of infidelity but ended up being fatal to the man-god. It is also borne by an Amazon who was killed by Hercules during his quest to obtain the golden girdle of Hippolyta.

In recent years, its Spanish form of Deyanira has been popular in Latin American countries. A common Spanish short form is Deya (DIE-ah).

Other forms include:

  • Dejanira Деянира Дэяніра Деянира (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Macedonian, Polish, Portuguese, Serbian, Slovene, Ukrainian, Russian)
  • Deianira (Catalan, Dutch, Finnish, Italian, Latin, Romanian, Scandinavian)
  • Déianeira (Czech, Hungarian)
  • Déjanire (French)
  • Deïaneira (German, Greek)
  • Deyanira (Spanish)

Sources

Thisbe

Thisbe_-_John_William_Waterhouse

Thisbe by John William Waterhouse


  • Origin: Greek, Semitic
  • Meaning: unknown
  • Gender: feminine
  • (THIZ-bee)

The name is of uncertain origin and meaning but possibly has a Semitic origin. Thisbe is the name of the lover of Pyramus in Ancient Classical literature, their story is recounted in Ovid’s Metamorphosis. Basically, they are 2 start-crossed Babylonian lovers who end up dying in a similar vein as Romeo & Juliet.

It is also the name of a city mentioned in the Bible, the birth place of the prophet Elijah and it is sometimes transliterated as Tishbe.

Thisbe is also the name of a nymph in Greek mythology who gave her the name to the town in Boeotia of the same name, it’s contemporary Greek form being Thisvi.

As for its usage, I found a record for a Thisby Gilbank born in 1604 in Suffolk, England, but became extremely widespread in England and the American colonies by the 18th-century. It may have been used in reference to both the Greek character and the place in the Bible.

Other forms include:

  • Tisbe (Catalan, Galician, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Thisbe (Dutch, English, German, Scandinavian)
  • Thisbé (French)
  • Thiszbé (Hungarian)
  • Tisbèa (Occitanian)
  • Tysbe (Polish)
  • Fisba Фисба (Russian)
  • Tisba Тісба (Slovenian, Ukrainian)

Sources

Frank

Dagobert III, King of the Franks


  • Origin: German
  • Meaning: “Frankish, free”
  • Gender: Masculine

From the name of an ancient Germanic people who ultimately settled in what is now France and the Netherlands, the origin of the name itself is somewhat disputed. A popular etymology is that it comes from the Old German frank (free). Others contend that it comes from a Germanic word for “javelin” or its linked with an Old Germanic root word meaning “bold, fierce; insolent.”

As a given-name, it has been in use since the 8th-century, preceding the use of the name of Francis, of which Frank later became a popular diminutive. The name of the country of France and its old currency of francs, gets its name from the Franks.

Frank was a very popular name in the U.S. at the turn of the 20th-century. Its appeared in the U.S. Top 10 between 1881-1922, peaking at #6 between 1880-1892. As of 2018, it was the 392nd most popular male name. His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • #32 (Sweden, 2018)
  • #155 (England & Wales, 2018)

Frank is also used in Estonia, Finland, French-speaking countries, Dutch-speaking countries, German-speaking countries and Scandinavia.


Other forms include:

  • Franker (Danish)
  • Franck (French)
  • Frang (Gaelic, Scandinavian)
  • Franko (German)
  • Franco (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Francen (Dutch, archaic)
  • Vranck (Dutch, archaic)
  • Frake (Finnish)
  • Frankku, Prankku (Finnish)
  • Fränk (Letzbergerisch)
  • Vranken (Middle Dutch)

Feminine forms include:

  • Franka (Czech, German, Dutch)
  • France (French)
  • Franca (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish)

Sources

Wilfred

160px-Chichester_Cathedral_Wilfrid_window


  • Origin: Anglo-Saxon
  • Meaning: “desiring peace.”
  • Gender: masculine

The name is composed of the Anglo-Saxon elements, wil (will, desire) and frið (peace). It was borne by 2 English bishops of Worcester, one of whom is a Catholic saint and a 9th-century Catalan count, known as Wilfred the Hairy (b. 878-897). Wilfred was of Gothic origins and he is known to have established a hereditary dukedom in Catalonia. It’s Spanish form of Wilfredo traces its origins back to the Visigoths in Spain and has remained a fairly common male name in many Hispanic countries.

Many name books and dictionaries claim this name fell out of use by the Norman Conquest, but records contradict this claim as Wilfred was still recorded by the 16th-century. More accurately, the name became extremely popular at the turn of the 20th-century in both England & the United States

Wilfred appeared in the U.S. Top 1000 between 1880-1984 & peaked at #164 in 1917. In England & Wales, he is currently the 143rd most popular male name (2018).

Other forms include:

  • Wilfrið (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Guifré (Catalan)
  • Vildfred, Wildfred (Danish)
  • Wilfried (Dutch, German)
  • Wifred (English)
  • Wilfrid (English)
  • Wilfrith (English
  • Vilfrid (Finnish, Swedish)
  • Wilfryd (Frisian, Polish)
  • Vilfredo (Italian)
  • Wilfredus, Vilfredus (Late Latin)
  • Willifred (Old German)
  • Wilfredo (Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Vilfred, Willfred (Scandinavian)
  • Wifredo (Spanish)

In the English-speaking world, common short forms include Will, Wilf, Wilfy & Fred. A feminine form that is used in German-speaking countries, the Netherlands, Spanish-speaking countries, Portuguese speaking countries is Wilfreda, while Vilfrida is a Scandinavian feminine form.


Sources

Penny, Pennie

Pennies


The name can either be a diminutive offshoot of Penelope or Pernille. The name was already in use as an independent female name in England by the 1640s. Its use may have been influenced by the currency.

Currently, Penny is 198th most popular female name in England & Wales & the 754th most popular in the U.S.A (2018). In the U.S., Penny peaked at #86 in 1963. She appeared in the Swedish top 100 between 2016-2017, peaking at #81 in 2016.

The name has also been in use in Scandinavian countries and Finland since the 19th-century. A Faroese form is Penný.

The name is borne by British model Penny, Lady Stewart Landcaster (b. 1971); and American actress and director, Penny Marshall (1943-2018).

Sources

Vala

Velléda_contemplant_la_demeure_d'Eudore,_29_March_2016

Detail of a sculpture of the Germanic seeress Veleda, Hippolyte Maindron, 1844

  • Origin: Old Norse
  • Gender: feminine

The name is Old Norse and can either be derived from the Old Norse vǫlva meaning “fortune-teller, prophet,” or a short form of any Norse name beginning in the Valr element, which might relate to valr “slain” as in Valhalla (hall of the slain) or the Old High Germanic, walah meaning foreigner; stranger”; later “Welsh.”

The name’s use was first recorded in Sweden in 1876, but may have been used in Norse times as well.

Another form is Valva.


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