Duha

  • Origin: Arabic ضحى
  • Meaning: “forenoon.”
  • Gender: unisex
  • DOO-hah

The name comes directly from the Arabic word for forenoon or late morning. In Islam, it is used in reference to Salat ad-Duha صَلَاة الضحى‎‎, a voluntary prayer that is said between Fajr and Dhuhr and is used mainly for the atonement of sins.

It is also the name of the 93rd chapter in the Qu’ran, al-Ḍuḥā الضحى‎, (the Morning).

As a given-name, it is traditionally unisex, but has been more often bestowed on females.

Other forms include:

  • Duha Духа (Albanian, Arabic (standard), Bashkir, Bosnian, Chechen, Kazakh, Kurdish, Turkish)
  • Zuha ज़ुहा (Azeri, Hindi)
  • Doha, Dohaa للال چاشت (Bengali, Urdu)
  • Dhuha (Javanese, Malaysian)
  • Zoha ضحی (Persian)
  • Zuho Зуҳо (Tajik, Uzbek)

Sources

Latif, Latifa

  • Origin: Arabic لَطِيْف
  • Meaning: “gentle; kind; benevolent.”

Latif is a masculine given-name which comes directly from the Arabic word لَطِيف (gentle; kind; benevolent). In Islam, Al-Latif لطيف, (the Kind; the Benevolent) is one of the 99 names of Allah (God). It’s feminine form is Latifa.

Latif & Latifa are commonly used throughout the Islamic world.

A notable American bearer is actress & singer, Queen Latifah.

Other forms include:

  • Latıif (m), Latıifa (f) (Avar)
  • Lətif (m), Lətife (f) (Azeri)
  • Latheef, Latheefa (Dhivehi)
  • Latifah (f) (Indonesian, Malaysian)
  • Letîf (m), Letîfe (f) (Kurdish)
  • Lәtyjif (m), Lәtyjifә (f) (Tatar)
  • Letife (f) (Turkish)
  • Lateef لطیف, Lateefa(h) (Urdu)

Sources

Cassiel

  • Origin: Hebrew פצִיאֵל
  • Meaning: “God is my cover; cover of God; speed of God.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • Pronunciation: Eng KAS-see-el

The name is derived from the Hebrew פצִיאֵל (Qaftzi’el), which is likely to mean “cover of God” or “God is my cover.” Other sources claim this name means “speed of God.” According to Judeo-Christian apocrypha, Cassiel is one of the 7 archangels. In the Hekhalot Rabbati, he is the one of the guardians of the doors of the 7th Heaven. In the Sefer Raziel, he is described as the Prince of Saturn, while in the Zohar, he is credited as being one of the aides of the Archangel Gabriel. He is also mentioned in the rabbinic literature of the Kabbalah. In Christian literature, he is mentioned in the grimoire known as The Sworn Book of Honorius as well as in Peter Abano’s Heptameron. He is mentioned in a Byzantine text regarding exorcism. He also appears as an archangel in mystic Islamic literature under the name كسفيائيل‎, Kasfiyāʼil.

Cassiel was traditionally believed to not have much input on the things that occur in the world of man, he was also considered the angel who presided over the death of kings as well as the angel of tears and the angel of temperance. His days are sometimes Thursday or Friday.

As a given-name, it has only come into occasional use the last century. It may have become even more widespread after its use in the Wim Wender 1987 film, Wings of Desire.

I could not find any strong evidence that this name has ever been used as a given-name among Jews or Muslims, though I don’t believe it is considered a forbidden name in either religion, more likely, the obscurity of the angel in the general populace of both religions has left the name obsolete.

Other forms include: Cafziel, Kafziel, Caphziel,Captiel, Cassael, Castiel, Qaspiel, Qephetzial, & Quaphsiel.

Forms in other languages include:

  • Kasfiyāʼil كسفيائيل‎, (Arabic)
  • Cassiël (Dutch)
  • Cassiel (English, French, German, Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Qaftzi’el קפציאל‎ (Hebrew)

Feminine forms include: Kasiela, Casiel(l)a, Qaftiziela (modern Hebrew); Cassielle (English, French), Cassiëlle (Dutch), Casiele (Brazilian-Portuguese).

Sources

Fuad

  • Origin: Arabic فُؤاد
  • Meaning: “heart.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • Pronunciation: foo-AD

The name comes directly from the Arabic word for heart. It is used equally among Arab- Muslims & Christians. Among Christians, particularly Palestinians, Chaldeans and Lebanese Christians who profess Roman Catholicism, it is used in reference to the Sacred Heart of Jesus or the Immaculate Heart of Mary, in the same way the Spanish name Corazón is used in the Spanish-speaking world, though in the Arabic case, the name is strictly masculine.

Among Muslims, the term fu’ad is used at least 5 times in the Quran. The name is used throughout the Islamic world.

It is even used among Non-Arab groups in the Middle East, such as Mizrachi Jews.

The name was borne by two Egyptian kings.

Other forms include:

  • Fuad (Amharic, Azeri, Bosnian, Indonesian)
  • Fouad (Maghrebi)
  • Fuat (Turkish)
  • Fawad (Urdu)

A feminine form is Fuada(h).

Sources

Shifa

  • Origin: Arabic شِفَاء
  • Meaning: “cure, remedy; healing.”
  • Gender: feminine

The name comes from the Arabic الشفاء (al-Shifaa), meaning, “cure, remedy, healing.”

Al-Shifaa bint Abdullah, nee Layla, was a companion of the prophet Muhammed. She was known as a healer, which is how she ended up with the sobriquet, Al-Shifaa, and is said to have taught literacy to the population of Medina.

A Maghrebi transliteration is Chifa.

Sources

Masuma

  • Origin: Arabic معصومة
  • Meaning: “innocent; sinless.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: MAH-soo-mah

The name is from the Arabic word meaning “innocent; sinless.” It was the sobriquet of a Shia Muslim saint by the name of Fatimah bint Musa, known as Fatimah al-Masumah (circ. 7th-century CE). She was the daughter of the seventh Twelver Shi’a Imam, Musa al-Kadhim and the sister of the eight Twelver Shia Imam, Ali al-Rida. Her shrine, which is located in Qom, Iran, is an important point of pilgrimage for many Shi’a Muslims.

The name was also borne by Masuma Sultan Begun (d. 1509), the Queen Consort of the Ferghana Valley & Samarkand & the fourth wife of Emperor Babur, founder of the Mughul Dynasty.

A variant transliteration is Massouma.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Məsumə (Azeri)
  • Masoumeh معصومه (Persian)
  • Masume (Turkish)

Sources

Rawda(h), Ravza

Photo by Brianna Martinez on Pexels.com
  • Origin: Arabic روضة
  • Meaning: “garden; meadow.”
  • Gender: Feminine
  • Pronunciation: ROW-dah; Turk (ROW-zah)

Rawdah روضة comes directly from the Arabic word for a “garden” or “meadow.” It is likely used by non-Arab Muslim parents in reference to Rawḍah ash-Sharifah (Arabic: روضة الشريفة‎, lit. ‘The Noble Garden’), which is a place located between the minbar and burial chamber of the Prophet Muhammed in Mecca.

The word itself is not used as a given-name in Arabic-speaking countries, but is used in non-Arabic Islamic countries, such as Southeast Asia and Turkey.

Its Turkish form of Ravza is currently the 78th most popular female name in Turkey. This form is also used among Bosnians & Albanians.

Sources

Rumaysah, Romaïssa

رُمَيْسَة
Photo by Rhyan Stark on Pexels.com

The name seems to be of disputed etymology, but is Arabic in origin. It was the name of Rumaysah bint Milhan known as Umm Sulaym, one of the first women to convert to Islam. Her son was Anas ibn Malik who was one of the companions of the Prophet Muhammed.

The name itself seems to have several meanings attached to it, according to QuranicNames.com, it possibly derives from رُمَيْسَة and mean “wind that scatters like dust.” If spelled رُمَيْثَة (transliterated as Rumaithah) it is the name of a place. It may also be linked with the Arabic root R-M-TH, which can mean “increasing.” Another association is that it is a feminine form of the Arabic male name Rams/Ramth meaning, “raft.”

Other sources have listed it as meaning “bouquet,” but I could not verify this information. If anyone has anymore information regarding the etymology of this name, it would be much appreciated.

Romaïssa (hro-MY-sah) is a North African variation that has been very popular in the Maghreb and in the Maghrebi Diaspora. 

It’s Turkish form of Rümeysa is the 94th most popular female name in Turkey (2019)/

Other transliterated forms include:

  • Romaysa(h)
  • Romeysa
  • Rumaila
  • Rumaisa(h)
  • Rumaitha
  • Rumaysah

Other forms include:

  • Rumejsa (Albanian/Bosnian)
  • Rusejma (Bosnian)
  • Rümeysa (Turkish)
  • Rumeysa (Turkish)
  • Romeesa (Urdu)

Sources

  1. https://quranicnames.com/rumaisah-
  2. https://www.behindthename.com/name/romaissa/submitted
  3. https://www.babynames.co.uk/names/rumaysa/
  4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umm_Sulaym_bint_Milhan
  5. https://www.names.org/n/rumaisah/about#pronunciation
  6. https://muslimnames.com/rumaisah
  7. https://hamariweb.com/names/muslim/arabic/girl/rumaisa-meaning_5822
  8. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umm_Sulaim_bint_Milh%C4%81n
  9. https://www.knjigaimena.com/?znacenje-imena-Rumejsa
  10. http://www.turkstat.gov.tr/PreTablo.do?alt_id=1059

Saqib

delacroix-auguste-an-arab-fisher-boy-P8535B

  • Origin: Arabic ثَاقِب
  • Meaning: “sharp, keen; insightful.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • (SAH-keeb)

The name is derived from the Arabic ثاقب (sharp-witted; keen; insightful). The word appears in the Quran in verses 37:10 and 86:3.

Other transliterations include: Saaqib, Saqeb, Saqeeb, Thaaqib, Thaqib & Thaqeb.

A feminine form is Saqibah.

Sources