Csanád

  • Origin: Hungarian
  • Meaning: unknown
  • Gender: masculine
  • Approx phonetic pronunciation: (CHAW-nad); IPA: (CHAW-nad)

The name is derived from a Magyar clan name, Csana, with the Hungarian diminutive suffix of -d added. Csana itself is of unknown etymology.

The name was borne by an 11th-century Hungarian ruler, a nephew of Stephan I of Hungary, also known as Cenad in Romanian, who was known for defeating his former ally Ajtony, and being given the county of what is now known as Csanád County in Hungary & Cenad County in Romania. He is recorded in the 13th-century Gesta Ungarorum and the the 14th-century, Long Life of St Gerard.

In post-modern Hungary, the name had been relatively rare prior to the 1990s but exploded in popularity by the 2000s. It appeared in the Top 100 Most Popular Male Names in Hungary between 2003-2018, peaking at #53 in 2007.

The designated name-days in Hungary are April 12, May 28, September 6 & December 5.

Other Hungarian forms include: Csana, Csani & Csankó.

Other forms include:

  • Chanadinus (Late Latin)
  • Cenad (Romanian)
  • Chanadin (Romanian)

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Doğan

  • Origin: Turkish
  • Meaning: “falcon.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • Pron: (DOH-ahn)

The name comes directly from the Turkish word for “falcon” or “hawk,” but is also a synonym for “rising,” or “born” in the Turkish language.

It appeared in the Top 100 Most Popular Male Names in Turkey between 1987-2002 and peaked at #74 in 1998.

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Phaedra

  • Origin: Greek Φαίδρα
  • Meaning: “bright.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: Eng (FAY-drah, FYE-drah, FEED-rah)

The name comes directly from the Greek word φαιδρός meaning, “bright.”

It is borne in Greek mythology by the sister of Ariadne and the wife of Theseus. There are several versions of her tragic tale, one is that Aphrodite drove Phaedra to fall madly in love with the latter’s step-son, Hippolytus who rejects Phaedra, and in retaliation, Phaedra claims that Hippolytus attempted to rape her. Theseus who was granted 3 wishes by Poseidon wishes his own’s son death by having Poseidon summon 3 bulls from the sea who subsequently dragged Hippolytus to death. In another version of the tale, Phaedra falls in love with Hippolytus of her own free-will but he rejects her, and the story follows the same sequence of events as above.

The story was retold by Ovid and Senece the Younger and later became the popular subject of plays throughout Europe.

In England and France, the name became more widespread after its use in Jean Racine’s 1677 play, Phèdre and later Algernon Charles Swinborn’s1866 play, Phaedra. Friedrich Schiller also wrote a play and recently it was the subject of the opera written by German playwrite, Hans Werner Henze.

It is also another name for the plant, Bernardia, as well as the name of a genus of butterfly and an asteroid.

In France, Phèdre is a unisex name as it is a translation of both Phaedra & Phaedrus.

Phaedra appeared in the Top 100 Most Popular Female Names in Belgium, ranking in at #87 in 1997.

A masculine form is Phaedrus and Phaidros.

Forms and use include:

  • Fedra Федра (Catalan, Corsican, Italian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Slovene, Spanish, Ukrainian)
  • Faidra (Czech, Finnish, Hungarian, Slovakian, Swedish)
  • Fædra (Danish)
  • Phaedra (Dutch, English, Latin)
  • Phèdre (French)
  • Phaidra Φαίδρα (German, Greek)
  • Phädra (German)

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Aynur, Ainura

  • Origin: Turkish
  • Meaning: “moonlight.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: I-noor; i-NOO-rah

Aynur is a Turkic female name, which is composed of the elements, ay (moon) and nur (light). It’s various offshoots across Central Asia have been popularly used.

Aynur appeared in the Turkish Top 100 Female Names between 1980-1997, and peaked at #22 in 1980.

Aynur is used as a female name in Azerbaijan, among the Uyghur and the Kurds. Among the Tatars of Russia, it is a masculine name, while Ajnur is a male name in Bosnia and Albania, it currently ranks in as the 11th most popular male name in Bosnia & Herzegovina (2019).

Other forms include:

  • Ajnura (Albanian, Bosnian)
  • Ainur Айнұр (Kazakh)
  • Ainura, Aynura Айнура (Kyrgyz)
  • Ainuria, Aynurya Айнурия (Tatar)

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Ezgi

  • Origin: Turkish
  • Meaning: “song; melody; tune.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: EZ-ghee

The name comes directly from the Turkish word for a song, tune or melody. The name appeard in the Top 100 Most Popular Female names in Turkey between 1989-2011, and peaked at #46 in 1992.

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Anil, Anila

Anila is from the Sanskrit आनिल (wind), in Hinduism it is an epithet for the wind God, Vayu. In contemporary India, both names are unisex.

Anıl is a Turkish unisex name meaning “the memory; to be remembered,” in Turkish. Anil is also a popular Albanian & Bosnian male name, while Anila is the feminine form that is exclusively used in Albania & Bosnia.

Anıl appeared in the Top 100 Most Popular Male Names in Turkey between 1990 and 2012, peaking at #51 in 1991.

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Bayram, Bajram

  • Origin: Turkic
  • Meaning: “festival; holiday.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • BY-rahm

The name comes directly from the Turkic word referring to any festival or public holiday, whether religious or secular.

Between 1980-2004, the name appeared in the Top 100 Most Popular Turkish Male Names, and peaked at #42 in 1981.

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Erkan

  • Origin: Turkish
  • Gender: masculine
  • (AIR-kahn)

The name is composed of the Turkish elements er (brave; valiant; man) & kan (blood; lineage).

The name appeared in the Turkish Top 100 between 1980-2003 & peaked at #17 in 1980.

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Osborn, Espen, Asbjørn

Osborn and Asbjørn are both composed of the Norse elements áss (god) & bjǫrn (bear), essentially meaning “divine bear.” Osborn is the modern Anglo-Saxon equivalent of Osbeorn, the latter of which was prevalent in Anglo-Saxon England and survived into the Norman period as Osbern, later developing into the common English patronymic surnames of Osbourne & Osbourn. Its Scandinavian equivalents still survive today in the forms of Esben (Danish), Espen (Danish, Norwegian) and still Asbjørn (Norwegian); and Asbjörn & Esbjörn (Swedish).

Osbeorn was borne by the son of Siward of Northumbria (circ. 11th-century CE) and one of the fallen of the Battle of the Seven Sleepers in Scotland. It was also borne by Osbern de Crépon (circ. 11th-century CE), one of the stewards of the Duke of Normandy. There are several other famous Anglophone personages who bear it as a surname and forename.

Asbjørn appeared in the Norwegian Top 100 Male Names between between 1945 & 1967, it peaked at #35 in 1946-7, while Espen appeared in the Top 100 in Norway between 1957-2004, peaking at #8 in 1982.

The designated name-day for Asbjörn is May 10th in Sweden.

General Scandinavian diminutive forms used in all Norse countries are Ebbe, Bjarne & Bjarni.

Short forms in English include Oz(z), Ozzie & Ozzy.

Other forms include:

  • Osbeorn (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Esbern (Danish, Faroese)
  • Asbjørn (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Esben, Espen (Danish, Norwegian)
  • Ausburn (English)
  • Osbourn (English)
  • Osbern (French, archaic)
  • Auber (French, archaic)
  • Ásbjörn (Icelandic)
  • Osberno (Italian)
  • Sberno (Italian)
  • Ásbjǫrn (Old Norse)
  • Asbjörn/Esbjörn (Swedish)

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Miglė

  • Origin: Lithuanian
  • Meaning: “mist; fog;” also “bluegrass.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: MIG-lay

The name comes directly from the Lithuanian word migla, meaning “fog; mist.” This is also the word for the plant, “bluegrass.”

It has been in the Top Most Popular Female Names in Lithuania since 1999, and peaked at #10 in 2010. As of 2019, it ranks in as the 21st most popular female name in Lithuania.

A notable bearer is Lithuanian Track Cyclist, Miglė Marozaitė (b. 1996).

The designated nameday in Lithuania is May 11th.

Other forms include: Migla, Miglena, Migleta, Miglija, Miglutė, Migle & Miglita.

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