Csanád

  • Origin: Hungarian
  • Meaning: unknown
  • Gender: masculine
  • Approx phonetic pronunciation: (CHAW-nad); IPA: (CHAW-nad)

The name is derived from a Magyar clan name, Csana, with the Hungarian diminutive suffix of -d added. Csana itself is of unknown etymology.

The name was borne by an 11th-century Hungarian ruler, a nephew of Stephan I of Hungary, also known as Cenad in Romanian, who was known for defeating his former ally Ajtony, and being given the county of what is now known as Csanád County in Hungary & Cenad County in Romania. He is recorded in the 13th-century Gesta Ungarorum and the the 14th-century, Long Life of St Gerard.

In post-modern Hungary, the name had been relatively rare prior to the 1990s but exploded in popularity by the 2000s. It appeared in the Top 100 Most Popular Male Names in Hungary between 2003-2018, peaking at #53 in 2007.

The designated name-days in Hungary are April 12, May 28, September 6 & December 5.

Other Hungarian forms include: Csana, Csani & Csankó.

Other forms include:

  • Chanadinus (Late Latin)
  • Cenad (Romanian)
  • Chanadin (Romanian)

Sources

Nectar, Nectaire, Nectarius, Nectaria

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: “nectar.”

Nectar is the English form of the Greek Nektarios Νεκτάριος, which is derived from νέκταρ (nektar), meaning “nectar, the drink of the gods. Nectar is not a name that has ever been in common use in the English-speaking world, but since it is the name of several Eastern and Western Christian saints, the proper English male translation of the name would be Nectar; or it would have appeared thus in the calendar.

It was borne by St. Nectaire of Auvergne, a 4th-century Christian missionary to the Gauls in what is now the Massif Central region of France. According to Gregory of Tours, he was sent by Pope Fabian, along with his brothers, where he transformed a temple that was dedicated to Apollo on Mont Cornadore into a cathedral that still stands, and was subsequently beheaded by the local Gaulic chieftain. The commune of Saint-Nectaire in the Puy-de-Dôme department of France gets its name from him, as does the cheese of the same name; or the latter technically comes from the Marshal of Senneterre, which is a linguistic corruption of Saint-Nectaire.

Male forms include:

  • Nektarij, Nektary Нектарий (Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Nectari (Catalan)
  • Nektarious (Coptic)
  • Nectarije (Croatian-Serbian)
  • Nectar (English)
  • Nectaire (French)
  • Nektari ნეკტარი (Georgian)
  • Nektarios Νεκτάριος (Greek)
  • Nettario (Italian)
  • Nectareus, Nectarius (Late Latin)
  • Nektārijs (Latvian)
  • Nektariusz (Polish)
  • Nectário (Portuguese)
  • Nectarie (Romanian)
  • Nectario (Spanish)

Feminine forms include

  • Nektaria, Nektarija Νεκταρία Nექთარიჯა Нектария (Coptic, Bulgarian, Georgian, Greek, Polish, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Ukrainian)
  • Nectarie (French)
  • Nettaria (Italian)
  • Nectaria (Latin, Romanian, Spanish)
  • Nectária (Portuguese)

A modern male Greek diminutive form is Nektary and the Russian diminutive form for both the male and female form is Nechka.

Sources

Gniewomir, Gniewomira

  • Origin: Polish
  • Meaning: “angry peace.”
  • Pron: (GNYEH-vo-MEER (ah))

Gniewomir (male) is composed of the Polish words gniew (anger wrath) and mir (peace). Polish linguist, Witold Taszycki claimed that this is one of the oldest Polish names. Gniewomira is its feminine form.

Other masculine forms include Gniewomar, Gniewomier, Gniewomierz, Gniemir and the reverse form of Mirogniew & Mirogniewa (female).

It’s nameday is February 8th.

Diminutive forms are Gniewko & Gniewosz for males & Gniewka for females.

Sources

Wolimir

  • Origin: Polish
  • Meaning: “he who wants peace.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • Pronunciation: VAHL-lee-MEER

The name is composed of the Polish words, woleć (to prefer, to want more) & mir (peace). Some Polish linguists have suggested it is a dialectical variation of Wojmir (war & peace).

Wolimir was borne by a 13th-century Bishop of Gniezno.

The designated name-days in Poland are March 5th, March 25th and December 15th.

Other forms include: Wolemir & Wolmir.

Source

Kintvilas, Kintvilė

Kintvilas (KINT-vih-las) is a Lithuanian male name which is composed of the Lithuanian words, kentėti (to suffer) & viltis (hope). It’s feminine form is Kintvilė (KINT-vil-lay).

The designated name-day is December 14th.

Source

Spyridon, Spyridoula

Spyridon is a Byzantine Greek male name which comes directly from the Greek word σπυρίδιον (spyridion), meaning “basket.” Other sources suggest it is a hellenised form of the Latin Spiritus (spirit). It was popularized by a 4th-century Greek saint who played a key role in the Council of Nicaea. He is revered as the patron saint of Corfu and of potters.

His feast day is December 12.

Spiro & Spyros are its short forms, while Spyridoula is the femininine form.

Spiro was borne by the 39th vice president of the United States, Spiro Agnew (1918-1996).

It was borne by Spyridon Louis, the first modern Olympic Gold medalist in the 1896 Summer Olympics.

Forms and usage include:

  • Spiridoni, Spiridhoni (Albanian)
  • Asbiridun اسبيريدون (Arabic)
  • Spiridon Спиридон (Assyrian, Bulgarian, Croatian, German, Lebanese-Arabic, Romanian, Serbian)
  • Espiridió, Espiridó (Catalan)
  • Spyridon Σπυρίδων (Coptic, French, Greek)
  • Špiro (Croatian)
  • Spi’ridon სპირიდონ (Georgian)
  • Spiridione, Spiridone (Italian)
  • Spirydon (Polish)
  • Espiridão (Portuguese)
  • Spiridón (Russian)
  • Espiridón, Espiridión (Spanish)
  • Spyrydon Спиридон (Ukrainian)

Italian feminine forms include: Spiridiona & Spiridona.

Sources

Thurstan, Torsten

  • Origin: Old Norse
  • Meaning: “Thor’s stone.”
  • Gender: masculine

Both names are derived from the Old Norse male name, Þórsteinn, literally meaning “Thor’s stone.” The name is attested as early as the 5th-century in Medieval Scandinavia and appears in the Norse saga, Draumr Þorsteins Síðu-Hallssonar.

It was transported to England by Anglo-Saxon & Norse settlers, the Anglo-Saxon form being Thurstan, and remained prevalent even after the conquest of the Normans, who themselves also used the name due to their original Norse heritage. Thurstan was borne by an 11th-century Bishop of York. Thurstan is the progenitor of the English surnames Thurston and Dustin.

Torsten appeared in Germany’s Top 100 Most Popular Male Names between 1960 and 1978, and peaked at #6 between 1964-68. While Torstein was in and out of the Norwegian Top 100 Male Names between 1947-1991, peaking at #84 in 1948. It’s original Old Norse form of Þórsteinn ranked in at #46 in Iceland’s Top 100 Male Names in 2012.

Forms include:

  • Turstin (Anglo-Norman, French)
  • Thurstan (English)
  • Tórstein (Faroese)
  • Torstein, Thorstein (Faroese, Norwegian)
  • Toro, Torro (Finnish, Scandinavian)
  • Torste,Torsti (Finnish)
  • Toutain (French, archaic)
  • Torsten (German, Scandinavian)
  • Thorsten (German, Scandinavian)
  • Torstene, Torsteni (Greenlandic)
  • Þórsteinn (Icelandic, Old Norse)
  • Turstino (Italian, Spanish)
  • Turstanus, Tursteinus, Turstinus (Late Latin)
  • Twyste (Middle Low German)
  • Tostein (Norwegian)
  • Dorste (Sami)
  • Toste (Scandinavian)
  • Tosten, Thosten (Swedish, archaic)

Sources

Katriel

  • Origin: Hebrew כתריאל
  • Meaning: “God is my crown.”
  • Gender: Masculine

The name is a Medieval Ashkenazi creation, composed of the Hebrew words keter (כֶּתֶר) “crown” and el (אֵל) “god.” It may have been a masculinized form of the popular Yiddish female name Kreindel (crown) or the Hebrew female name Atarah (crown).

  • Kadriel
  • Kasriel
  • Katsriel
  • Katzriel

There are the modern Israeli feminized forms of Katrielle, Katriella & Katriela.

A notable bearer was Israeli ambassador to the Soviet Union, Katriel Katz (1908-1988).

Sources

Ardal, Ardgal

  • Origin: Gaelic
  • Meaning: “high valour.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • AR-dahl

Ardghal is composed of the Gaelic àrd (high; tall) and gal (valour). The name was borne by Ardgal mac Conaill (circ. 6th-century), the 3rd king of Uisnech.

A notable modern bearer is Irish actor, Ardal O’Hanlon.

Other forms include:

  • Ardal (English)
  • Árdghal (Gaelic)
  • Ardghar (Gaelic)
  • Ardgalus (Late Latin)

Sources

Latif, Latifa

  • Origin: Arabic لَطِيْف
  • Meaning: “gentle; kind; benevolent.”

Latif is a masculine given-name which comes directly from the Arabic word لَطِيف (gentle; kind; benevolent). In Islam, Al-Latif لطيف, (the Kind; the Benevolent) is one of the 99 names of Allah (God). It’s feminine form is Latifa.

Latif & Latifa are commonly used throughout the Islamic world.

A notable American bearer is actress & singer, Queen Latifah.

Other forms include:

  • Latıif (m), Latıifa (f) (Avar)
  • Lətif (m), Lətife (f) (Azeri)
  • Latheef, Latheefa (Dhivehi)
  • Latifah (f) (Indonesian, Malaysian)
  • Letîf (m), Letîfe (f) (Kurdish)
  • Lәtyjif (m), Lәtyjifә (f) (Tatar)
  • Letife (f) (Turkish)
  • Lateef لطیف, Lateefa(h) (Urdu)

Sources