Tervel

Tervel_of_Bulgaria_monogram

Полк. Дянко Марков [CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D


  • Origin: Bulgarian Тервел
  • Meaning: unknown
  • Gender: masculine
  • (TAIR-vel)

The name is of unknown etymology. It was borne by an 8th-century Bulgarian khan of the Dulo Clan who was given the title of Caesar by Justinian II, the first known foreign ruler to receive such a distinction in Byzantine history.

Other forms include Tarvel, Terval, and the Greek Terbelis.


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Sławomir

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  • Origin: Polish
  • Meaning: “glorious peace; glorious world.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • (SWAH-vo-MEER)

The name is composed of the Old Polish elements, sławo (glory, fame, prestige) and mir (peace, serenity, world). It is the reverse form of Mirosław.


Its Germanic form of Sclaomir was borne by the brother of Drasco, an Obrodite prince who acted as a vassal for the Franks in the 9th-century.

Its Czech form of Slavomír was borne by a 9th-century Moravian duke who was known for leading a revolt against the Franks.


Designated name-days in Poland are May 17th, November 5th and December 23rd.


A common short form is Sławek.

The feminine form is Sławomira, with the diminutives Sława and Sławka.

Medieval Polish feminine forms found in 14th-century records are Sławna, Sławnica, Sławomirz, Sławomirza and Sławocha.

Other masculine forms include:

  • Slavamir Славамір (Belarusian)
  • Slavomir Славомир (Bosnian, Croatian, Russian, Serbian, Slovenian)
  • Slavomír (Czech/Slovak)
  • Sclaomir (German, archaic)
  • Sławòmir (Kashubian)
  • Sławomiar (Polish)
  • Eslavomir (Spanish)
  • Slavomyr Славомир (Ukrainian)

Feminine forms in other languages are Slavomíra (Czech & Slovak) and Slavomira (Bosnian, Croatian, Russian, Serbian, Slovenian)


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Eadric, Edric(h)

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  • Origin: Anglo-Saxon
  • Meaning: “rich ruler.”
  • Gender: Masculine
  • ENG (ED-drick; EE-drick)

The name is composed of the Anglo-Saxon elements, ead (rich) & ric (ruler). It was borne by a 6th-century King of Kent, an 11th-century Mercian ealderman known for his treachery with the Danes, and an Anglo-Saxon resister against the Normans..


It is the name of a character in the Frank Herbert’s 1969 novel, Dune.


Other forms include:

  • Ædric (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Edric (Czech, Spanish)
  • Adric (English)
  • Eadrich (English)
  • Odrich (English)
  • Edricus (Latin)

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Wilbert

Boy_bishop


  • Origin: German
  • Meaning: “bright will.”
  • Gender: masculine

The name is composed of the Old German elements will (will, desire) & beraht (bright). It was borne by a 9th-century bishop of Cologne and a 9th-century Bishop of Sherborne, England.

Wilbert appeared in the U.S. Top 1000 between 1880 & 1990 and peaked at #160 in 1920.

Recent notable bearers include English children’s author of Thomas the Tank Engine Fame, Wilbert Awdrey (1911-1997) & American singer & songwriter, Wilbert Harrison (1929-1994).


Wilbert is also used in German-speaking countries, French-speaking countries (now rare), the Netherlands and in the Scandinavian countries.

Other forms include:

  • Willibert (German)
  • Willabertus (Late Latin)

Common English short forms are Wilby, Will & Willy.


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Jomar, Jómarr

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  • Origin: Old Norse
  • Meaning: “famous horse.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • YOH-mar

The name is composed of the Old Norse elements, jór (horse) and marr (famous).

The name has recently become common in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

Other forms include:

  • Jómar (Icelandic)
  • Jomar (Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish)

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Frank

Dagobert III, King of the Franks


  • Origin: German
  • Meaning: “Frankish, free”
  • Gender: Masculine

From the name of an ancient Germanic people who ultimately settled in what is now France and the Netherlands, the origin of the name itself is somewhat disputed. A popular etymology is that it comes from the Old German frank (free). Others contend that it comes from a Germanic word for “javelin” or its linked with an Old Germanic root word meaning “bold, fierce; insolent.”

As a given-name, it has been in use since the 8th-century, preceding the use of the name of Francis, of which Frank later became a popular diminutive. The name of the country of France and its old currency of francs, gets its name from the Franks.

Frank was a very popular name in the U.S. at the turn of the 20th-century. Its appeared in the U.S. Top 10 between 1881-1922, peaking at #6 between 1880-1892. As of 2018, it was the 392nd most popular male name. His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • #32 (Sweden, 2018)
  • #155 (England & Wales, 2018)

Frank is also used in Estonia, Finland, French-speaking countries, Dutch-speaking countries, German-speaking countries and Scandinavia.


Other forms include:

  • Franker (Danish)
  • Franck (French)
  • Frang (Gaelic, Scandinavian)
  • Franko (German)
  • Franco (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Francen (Dutch, archaic)
  • Vranck (Dutch, archaic)
  • Frake (Finnish)
  • Frankku, Prankku (Finnish)
  • Fränk (Letzbergerisch)
  • Vranken (Middle Dutch)

Feminine forms include:

  • Franka (Czech, German, Dutch)
  • France (French)
  • Franca (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish)

Sources

Wilfred

160px-Chichester_Cathedral_Wilfrid_window


  • Origin: Anglo-Saxon
  • Meaning: “desiring peace.”
  • Gender: masculine

The name is composed of the Anglo-Saxon elements, wil (will, desire) and frið (peace). It was borne by 2 English bishops of Worcester, one of whom is a Catholic saint and a 9th-century Catalan count, known as Wilfred the Hairy (b. 878-897). Wilfred was of Gothic origins and he is known to have established a hereditary dukedom in Catalonia. It’s Spanish form of Wilfredo traces its origins back to the Visigoths in Spain and has remained a fairly common male name in many Hispanic countries.

Many name books and dictionaries claim this name fell out of use by the Norman Conquest, but records contradict this claim as Wilfred was still recorded by the 16th-century. More accurately, the name became extremely popular at the turn of the 20th-century in both England & the United States

Wilfred appeared in the U.S. Top 1000 between 1880-1984 & peaked at #164 in 1917. In England & Wales, he is currently the 143rd most popular male name (2018).

Other forms include:

  • Wilfrið (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Guifré (Catalan)
  • Vildfred, Wildfred (Danish)
  • Wilfried (Dutch, German)
  • Wifred (English)
  • Wilfrid (English)
  • Wilfrith (English
  • Vilfrid (Finnish, Swedish)
  • Wilfryd (Frisian, Polish)
  • Vilfredo (Italian)
  • Wilfredus, Vilfredus (Late Latin)
  • Willifred (Old German)
  • Wilfredo (Portuguese, Spanish)
  • Vilfred, Willfred (Scandinavian)
  • Wifredo (Spanish)

In the English-speaking world, common short forms include Will, Wilf, Wilfy & Fred. A feminine form that is used in German-speaking countries, the Netherlands, Spanish-speaking countries, Portuguese speaking countries is Wilfreda, while Vilfrida is a Scandinavian feminine form.


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Amabel, Amabilis, Mabel

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Amabilis is a Late Latin unisex name derived from the Latin word for “lovable.” It was used throughout Medieval Western Europe on both males and females, and was borne by a St. Amabilis of Riom (a 5th-century male French saint known in his native language as Amable) and St. Amabilis of Rouen, a 7th-century female French saint.

Amable, Amabel, Mabel have been used exclusively on females in England since Medieval times and was introduced by the Anglo-Normans in the 11th-century. They have gone in and out of popularity since the 11th-century, especially Mabel.

Between 1880-1922, Mabel was among the top 100 most popular female names, peaking at #15 in 1891 and is currently the 435th most popular female name (2018).

In England & Wales, Mabel is currently the 104th most popular female name (2018).

in Ireland, it was often used as an anglicized form of Maeve and it is often speculated that Annabel is an offshoot.

Mabel is the name of a character in C.M. Yonge’s 1854 novel, The Heir of Radclyffe.

Mabel is also used in Dutch, Czech & Slovak, Galician, German & Spanish.

It was borne by several early Anglo-Norman countesses and other notable bearers include: 13th-century English embroiderer, Mable of Bury St. Edmund; Princess Mabel of Orange-Nassau (b. 1968); and British pop-singer Mabel (b. 1996).

Other forms include:

  • Amabel, Amabil, Amiable (Anglo-Norman, English)
  • Mabinka, Mejbl (Czech, Slovak)
  • Mabella, Mabelle, Mable, Maybelline (English)
  • Amabilie, Mabile, Mabilie (French, archaic)
  • Mábel (Hungarian)
  • Amabilia (Italian, Late Latin, Swedish)
  • Mabilia (Italian, Late Latin, English)

Amable & Aimable are male names in France, while Amabile is an Italian unisex form. Caradec or Karadeg are Breton masculine forms that is directly translated from the Latin.


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Vala

Velléda_contemplant_la_demeure_d'Eudore,_29_March_2016

Detail of a sculpture of the Germanic seeress Veleda, Hippolyte Maindron, 1844

  • Origin: Old Norse
  • Gender: feminine

The name is Old Norse and can either be derived from the Old Norse vǫlva meaning “fortune-teller, prophet,” or a short form of any Norse name beginning in the Valr element, which might relate to valr “slain” as in Valhalla (hall of the slain) or the Old High Germanic, walah meaning foreigner; stranger”; later “Welsh.”

The name’s use was first recorded in Sweden in 1876, but may have been used in Norse times as well.

Another form is Valva.


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Rhys

220px-Rice_ap_Gryffydd,_Prince_of_Wales

Rhys ap Gruffydd


A classic masculine Welsh name, it was borne by 2 early Welsh rulers, Rhys ap Tewdwr who died in the battle of Brecon (1040-1093) and his grandson Rhys ap Gruffydd (1132-1197), who fought against the invading Normans.

The name is derived from the Old Welsh rīs which means “passion, ardor, fiery, enthusiasm.”

The name is borne by several other historical Welsh personages and has spun the surnames of Price (son of Rhys) and Rice. It is sometimes anglicized as Reece or Reese.

Rhys is currently the 464th Most Popular Male Name in the United States (2018) and the 196th Most Popular in England & Wales (2018).

Its anglicized offshoot of Reece currently ranks in as the 599th Most Popular Male Name in the United States (2018) and the 326th Most Popular Male Name in England & Wales (2018), whereas Reese is the 659th Most Popular Male Name.

The name is currently borne by British actor, Rhys Ifans.

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