Lilian

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Latin
Meaning: “lily.”
Fre (Pronunciation)

Not to be confused with the feminine English name, Lillian, though they share the same etymology, Lilian has always been a male name in France, its feminine form being Liliane.

Lilian is derived from the Latin lilium (lily).

As of 2010, Lilian was the 78th most popular male name in France.

Lily, Lillian

Gender: Feminine
Origin: English

The name comes directly from the name of the flower, (in particular, in reference to lilium candidum, the classic white lily, also known as the madonna lily), and was a popular choice throughout the English-speaking world in the 18th and early part of the 20th centuries.

It has recently been revived. It is currently the 4th most popular female name in the United Kingdom (2009) and the 17th in the United States (2010). So far, this is the highest that Lily has ever ranked in U.S. naming history.

In other countries, her rankings are as follows:

  • # 6 (New Zealand, 2010)
  • # 7 (Australia, NSW, 2010)
  • # 8 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 10 (Canada, B.C., 2010)
  • # 13 (Ireland, 2010)
  • # 15 (Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 45 (France, 2009)
  • # 51 (Belgium, 2008)
  • # 161 (Netherlands, 2010)
  • # 173 (Norway, 2010)

For several centuries, Lily was a symbol of purity and sometime of death, among Roman Catholics, the name was often a symbol of the Virgin Mary.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Lily (Dutch/English/French/German/Scandinavian)
  • Lilly/Lilli/Lillie (German)
  • Lili (Hungarian)
  • Lilja (Icelandic/Finnish)
  • Líle (Irish-Gaelic)
  • Lilia (Polish)
  • Lília (Portuguese)
  • Lilia/Liliya Лилия (Russian/Ukrainian)
  • Lilly (Scandinavian)

Vernacular forms of Lily, (that is names that are not derived from the Latin lilium but mean lily in their native tongue)

  • Kremena (Bulgarian: masculine form is Kremen)
  • Lis/Lys (French)
  • Shoshannah שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Hebrew)
  • Crina (Romanian: masculine form is Crin)
  • Azucena (Spanish)

Another form of Lily is the Latin Liliana, which is derived from the Latin word, lilium, meaning, “lily.” This has spun off the English female name of Lillian, which has been in usage in the English-speaking world since the 16th-century. Careful on the spelling though, because if spelled with one L that makes it a French masculine name.

Lillian is also sometimes believed to have originally been a diminutive form of Elizabeth, in fact, the name Lily was commonly used as a pet form of Elizabeth.

Currently, Lillian is the 21st most popular female name in the United States, (2010) and is rising. She is somewhat of a vintage, she was the 10th most popular female name for 4 years in a row between 1898-1901. The lowest that Lillian has ranked in U.S. history so far was in 1978, coming in as the 486th most popular female name. Her rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 39 (Liliana, Hungary, 2010)
  • # 93 (Australia, NSW, 2010)
  • # 124 (Liliana, United States, 2010)

Other forms include:

  • Lilyana Лиляна (Bulgarian)
  • Liliana (Czech/English/Hungarian/Italian/Polish/Portuguese/Romanian/Spanish)
  • Lillian (English/Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Liliane (French)
  • Liljana Лилјана (Macedonian/Slovene)
  • Lilianna (Polish)
  • Lilias (Scottish)
  • Lilijana (Slovene)

Masculine French form is Lilian.

Basque Names….just a Subcategory of Spanish Names?

This weeks International Name Over View will focus on Basque Names.

The Basque are an ethnic group that inhabit the Pyrenees of Northwestern Spain and the bordering region of Southern France. Their language has yet to be categorized, often a topic of hot debate among Linguists. While some theorists have connected Basque from Georgian to Etruscan, the most widely accepted consensus is that Basque is closely related to the now extinct Aquitanian (spoken in France). It is in fact an indigenous European language. That is, it is not related to any of the Indo-European languages. It is considered an Isolate Language and it was most likely spoken in Europe long before the mass migration of the Indos.

Though either French or Spanish citizens, the Basque are fiercely proud of their language and culture. In the last century, there has been a strong push for autonomy. The Basque have fought hard to keep their language alive, most recently fighting oppression during the Franco regime, and are currently experiencing a revival. The Basque language is spoken by approximately 665,800 people. Not a lot, but believe it or not, the Basque and their language have actually left an impact in Spanish and even English.

Some of the more common Spanish surnames seen among Spanish-speakers are actually of Basque and not of Spanish origin. For example: Aldana, Loyola and Zuñiga.

Since the Basque were valuable in shepherding, fishing and mercantilism, a vast population of them immigrated to the Americas, leaving their imprint on modern Hispanic culture.

The country of Chile boasts Basque as their largest European ethnic group. The largest Basque-American population resides in Boise, Idaho. A fair amount of the Mexican population can claim Basque heritage to some extent.

As a result, several place names throughout the Americas are Basque, like Durango (Mexico), Nuevo Santander, (Mexico), Jalapa (Guatemala) and it is even argued that Arizona is derived from the Basque elements, aritz ona meaning “good oak.”

Our very own Xavier, which appears in the U.S. top 100 most popular male names was inspired by a Basque surname. Its usage as a given name was popularized by the notoriety of the Basque saint, Francis Xavier. Another notable Basque Saint is Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Society of Jesus.

One of the ways that the Basque people have expressed their culture is through their first names. The Basque have a unique array of names, one feature that seems unique among them is their usage of place names. Unlike Anglo-phone parents who tend to use place names because of “cuteness”  or sonority, the Basque use place names due to religious significance. Basque culture has a strong emphasis on Catholicism, so any place or thing associated with the Virgin Mary is often used as a given name.

For a good idea of what the Basque in Spain are currently naming their children, check out the Top 10 listed below:

Top 10 Male Names in Basque Country, Spain 2008

Mikel

Pablo

Iker

Aimar

Asier

Unai

Iñigo

Javier

Aitor

Adrián

Top 10 Female Names in the Basque Country, Spain 2008

Lucía

Paula

Irati

Nahia

Uxue

Leyre

Sara

María

Ane

Ainhoa/Aitana

Mikel, Pablo, Adrián, Iñaki, Sara, María, Ane, Lucía and Paula are all derived from Biblical or saints names.

Aitor (good fathers) is a name taken from Basque folklore, he is believed to have been the first man and the progenitor of the Basque people.

Iker is the vernacular form of Visitación, an unusual Spanish name used in reference to the Virgin Mary (Our Lady of the Visitation). This is the same case with the female Irati, which is a place-name associated with a shrine to the Virgin Mary, which literally means “fern field”; and Uxue taken from the name of a Catholic shrine, but is also associated with the Basque word for dove. Ainhoa is a religious place-name name and even appears in the Spanish Top 100, coming in as the 31st most popular female name in all of Spain. Aitana is a Spanish place-name of unknown meaning. Leyre is the Spanish form of Leire, the name of a place in the Basque country associated with a Catholic monastery.

Nahia is from a Basque word meaning, “wish; desire.”

Unai is an indigenous Basque name with no Spanish or English equivalent, meaning “cowherd.”

Asier is from the Basque hasiera meaning “beginning.”

I have yet to find any information on Aimar, but subsequent searches led me to several notable Basque bearers, so I am assuming that he is Basque too. If anyone has anymore info on him, please step forward 🙂

You might be one of the many Latinas or Americans who claim Basque heritage, or perhaps you are just looking for a cool and different name that is actually legitimate. Below are a list of names I have compiled for the Anglo-phone parent. Basque names that would be easy for an English-speaking child to wear. Enjoy 🙂

Easy to say Basque alternatives to common English names

Instead of Caitlin try Catalin

Instead of Emma try out Ama

Instead of Madison or Madelyn, you might like Maialen or Malen

Like Olivia, try Olaria

Loving Ella, then you might like Elaia (swallow)

Considering Hannah well you just might like Oihana (forest)

Like Nevaeh check out Nerea

Here is a selection of Basque names compatible with English:

Female

  • Alaia (joyful; happy)
  • Amaia (end)
  • Elixane (Elise)
  • Esti (Sweet; honey)
  • Garden (transparent; clear)
  • Julene (Juliana)
  • Katerin (Catherine)
  • Lilura (enchantment)
  • Lorea (flower)
  • Maia (Maddie)
  • Miren (Mary)
  • Naiara
  • Nora
  • Oria
  • Pauli
  • Semera
  • Zerran
  • Zilia

Male

  • Adon
  • Bingen (Vincent)
  • Denis (Dennis)
  • Eder (beautiful)
  • Erroman (Raymond)
  • Gabon (Christmas)
  • Harri (rock)
  • Hartz (Bear)
  • Igon (Ascension)
  • Jurdan (Jordan)
  • Kelemen (Clement)
  • Kemen (Strength)
  • Lain
  • Luken (Luke)
  • Manex (John)
  • Zorion (happy)

Basque Equivalents to Common English Given Names

Female

  • Alize (Alice)
  • Ane (Anna)
  • Elixabete (Elizabeth)
  • Estebeni (Stephanie)
  • Fede (Faith)
  • Gartxene (Grace)
  • Itxaro (Hope)
  • Kalare (Claire)
  • Lili (Lily)
  • Mikele (Michaela)
  • Mixtoleta (Poppy)
  • Nikole (Nicole)
  • Hirune/Irune (Trinity)
  • Udane (Summer)
  • Udazken (Autumn)

Male

  • Adame (Adam)
  • Alesander (Alexander)
  • Danel (Daniel)
  • Edorta (Edward)
  • Eli (Elias)
  • Gabirel (Gabriel)
  • Gilen (William)
  • Handi (Max)
  • Ixaka (Isaac)
  • Jakes (Jacob)
  • Jon (John)
  • Marz (Mark)
  • Nikola (Nicholas)
  • Txomin (Dominic)
  • Xabier (Xavier)
  • Xarles (Charles)

What are your favorite Basque names? Would you use any of the above?

Sources

  1. http://www.behindthename.com/
  2. http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~witzel/mt26s.html
  3. http://www.ei.ehu.es/p056-12532/eu/contenidos/informacion/grammar_euskara/en_doc/index.html
  4. http://www1.euskadi.net/morris/resultado.asp
  5. http://www.euskarakultur.org/
  6. http://www.eke.org/euskara/
  7. http://basque.unr.edu/

Susan, Susannah

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Hebrew
Meaning: “lily; rose.”

Susannah is the anglicized form of the Biblical Greek Sousanna (Σουσαννα) which in turn, is a translation of the Biblical Hebrew שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Shoshannah). Shoshannah is derived from the Hebrew word ששון (shoshan) which means “lily” in ancient Hebrew, but in modern Hebrew has evolved to mean “rose.”

The Hebrew word of shoshan has been traced to the ancient Egyptian element, sšn meaning “lotus” and is also believed to be linked with the Hebrew word ששון (sasson) meaning, “joy”.

It is also interesting to note that in modern Farsi, the word for lily is sausan compare to shoshan.

The ancient place name of Susa is also believed to be related to the Semitic botanical word, due to the so-called abundance of lilies that used to thrive in the area.

In the Old Testament (or Apocrypha) the name is borne by a woman falsely accused of adultery. She is rescued by the prophet Daniel who tricks her accusers and reverses the accusations against them.

It is also borne in the New Testament by a companion of Mary and a disciple of Christ. She is revered as a saint in the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches.

Susan is a Middle English knock off, most likely influenced by the French Suzanne, which might have been introduced by the Norman conquerors in the 11th-century.

Currently, Susannah does not appear in the U.S. top 1000, (2008), but she has become especially trendy in many Central and Eastern European countries (in her various vernacular forms of course).

Her rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 22 Zuzana (Czech Republic, 2009)
  • # 96 Zsuzsanna (Hungary, 2009)
  • # 8 Suzana (Macedonia, 2006)
  • # 3 Zuzanna (Poland, 2008)
  • # 3 Zuzana (Slovakia, 2004)

In the English-speaking world, Susan was especially popular after World War II. In the United States, it is often considered dated and is usually associated with someone in their early 60s to late 50s. In fact, she remained a staple among the Baby-Boom Generation all the way to the early beginnings of the Generation Xers. She remained strong in the top 10 for over 20 years. The highest she peaked was between 1957 and 1960, coming in as the second most popular female name. Currently, she stands at a meagre #711.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Sawsan (Arabic)
  • Shushan (Armenian)
  • Sjusanna (Bulgarian)
  • Zulisja (Bulgarian)
  • Susanna (Catalan/Estonian/Finnish/German/Italian/Romansch/Swedish/Ukrainian)
  • Suzana (Croatian/Macedonian/Romanian/Serbian/Slovene)
  • Zuzana (Czech/Slovak/Lithuanian)
  • Sanna/Sanne (Danish/Dutch/Finnish/Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Susanne (Dutch/German/Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Susan (English)
  • Soosan سوسـن (Farsi)
  • Suzanne (French)
  • Suzette (French: originally a diminutive, but long regarded as an independent given name)
  • Šušanik შუშანიკ (Georgian)
  • Sousanna Σουσαννα (Greek)
  • Susann (German/Scandinavian)
  • Shoshana שושנה (Hebrew: Modern)
  • Zsuzsanna (Hungarian: ZHOO-zhawn-naw)
  • Zane (Latvian)
  • Zuzanna (Latvian/Polish: zoo-ZAHN-nah; zoo-ZAHN-ne-nah)
  • Sosamma (Malayalam)
  • Huhana (Maori)
  • Żużanna (Polish: archaic, possibly based off the Hungarian form. zhoo-ZHAHN-ne-nah)
  • Susana (Portuguese/Spanish)
  • Sana (Romansch)
  • Susauna (Romansch)
  • Sjusanna Сюзанна (Russian)
  • Suzan (Turkish)

Bulgarian diminutives include: Susa, Suzanka and Susak
Czech/Slovak short for is Zuza
English short forms are: Sue, Suzie and occasionally, Sukie/Sookie.
French affectionate forms include: Suzelle/Suzel, Suzette, Suzie and Suzon
Hungarian short forms are: Zsazsa, Zsuzsa and Zsuzsi.
Lithuanian diminutives are: Zune and Zuze
Polish diminutives include: Zanna, Żanna, Zanka, Zańka, Zuchna, Zula, Zuzia and Zużka
Spanish diminutives are: Susanita & Susi

The designated name-day is August 11 in (Estonia, Finland and Sweden).

Sources

Lillemor

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Norwegian/Swedish
Meaning: “little mother.”
(LIL-leh-MORE)

With the recent surge of popularity in Lily names, I thought this unusual gem might be worth posting, though considered an “old lady” name in Scandinavia, it might make a fresh and interesting option for an Anglophone parent.

Lillemor is relatively recent in history, she first appeared in Norway as a nickname and was first recorded as a full-fledged given name in Sweden in 1901. The name comes from the Norwegian and Swedish words lille meaning “little; small” and mor meaning “mother.” Ask most Swedes or Norwegians how they feel about this name and they will likely frown, she is somewhat the equivalent of a Mildred to an American. She was quite fashionable during the 1930s and 40s, and is hence, usually considered a name of its time. She has, however, spawned off a fashionable nickname name: Moa, which is currently very trendy in Sweden as an independent given name.

Her name-day is November 18. As of December 31, 2008, there were approximately 11, 198 women who bore the name Lillemor in Sweden.

Nicknames are Lily and Moa.

Elisabeth, Elizabeth

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Hebrew
Meaning: “God is my oath; God is abundance.”

The name is a transliterated form of the Biblical Greek Ελισβετ (Elisabet), which is a Hellenized version of the Biblical Hebrew feminine name, אֱלִישֶׁבַע‎ (Elisheva).

Elizabeth appears twice in the Bible, once in the Old Testament as the name of Aaron’s wife and once in the New Testament as the wife of Zachariah and the mother of John the Baptist.

Elizabeth has remained fairly consistent in the U.S top 100 for over a hundred years. She currently ranks in at # 9 and the lowest she has ever come in the U.S. charts was in 1945 at # 26.

In Australia she is the 37th most popular female name (2007), in Canada, she ranks in at # 20 (2008), in England/Wales she came in at # 40 (2008), in Ireland at # 63 (2007) and in Scotland at # 68 (2008).

The name was borne by several saints and European royalty. Among the most notable bearers were, St. Elizabeth of Hungary, a 12th-century Hungarian princess who was known for her acts of kindness and charity toward the poor and Queen Elizabeth I of England, including the current reigning Queen, Elizabeth II.

The name Isabel/Isabella are relatives, but have becomes so far apart from its original source, that they often occur concurrently in many European countries with Elizabeth, hence is why I shall devote a different post to Isabel/Isabella, but I shall cite her several times in this article as a variation whenever needed.

I believe one of the reasons why Elizabeth has been a long time favorite, is because of her versatility. She can be shortened to a variety of different nicknames, especially in English. The most popular are: (I have cited the ones that have commonly been used as independent given name with a black club)

Bess, Bessie, Beth♣, Bets, Betsy, Bet, Bettie/Betty, Bezzy, Bit, Bitsy, Biz, Buffy, Elisa♣, Elise♣, Elle♣, Eliza♣, Ella♣, Ellie, Elsa♣, Elsie♣, Ibbie, Lib, Libby, Lilly, Lisa♣, Liz, Lizzie, Liza♣, Tetty, Tibby and Tizzy.

Other forms of the name include:

Latinate Forms
Forms found in Latinate/Romance languages

  • Sabela (Asturian)
  • Elisabèt, Lisabèt (Bearnais)
  • Elisabet (Catalan)
  • Babette (French: originally a diminutive form, used as independent given name, now considered extremely dated)
  • Élisabeth (French)
  • Élise (French)
  • Lise (French)
  • Lisette (French: originally a diminutive form but exclusively used as an independent given name)
  • Bettina (Italian)
  • Elisa (Italian/French/Portuguese: appears in Boccaccio’s Decameron as the name of one of the female story tellers).
  • Elisabella (Italian: obscure)
  • Elisabetta (Italian/Romansch)
  • Elisa (Italian/Sardinian/Spanish)
  • Elisanna/Elisena (Italian: obscure)
  • Elisetta (Italian)
  • Lelisa (Italian: obscure)
  • Lisa (Italian/Spanish)
  • Lisella (Italian: obscure)
  • Lisena (Italian: obscure)
  • Lisetta (Italian)
  • Lisina/Lisinda (Italian: obscure)
  • Lisanna (Italian)
  • Elisabetha (Late Latin)
  • Elizabetta (Liguru: a minor language spoken in Italy)
  • Elisabeta/Elisèu/Eliso (Occitanian)
  • Elisabete/Elisete/Elsa (Portuguese)
  • Babèu/Eisabèu/ Lisabèu (Provencal: Babeu is a diminutive)
  • Elisabeta (Romanian/Spanish)
  • Lisabetta (Romansch/Corsican)
  • Lisabbetta (Sicilian)
  • Isabel/Ysabel (Spanish/Aragonese/Catalan/Galician/Portuguese)

Germanic Forms
Forms used in Germanic languages

  • Elsabe (Afrikaans)
  • Liesel (Alsatian)
  • Elisabet (Danish/Faroese/Swedish/Norwegian)
  • Elsebeth (Danish)
  • Else (Danish)
  • Lise (Danish/German)
  • Lis (Danish/Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Lisbet (Danish/Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Lisbeth (Danish/German)
  • Els (Dutch: a diminutive form, occasionally used as an independent give name)
  • Elsa (Dutch/German/Swedish)
  • Liesbeth/Lijsbeth (Dutch)
  • Liesje (Dutch)
  • Eliza (English: originally a diminutive, exclusively used as an independent given name)
  • Elsba/Elsbet/Elsuba/Elusbet (Faroese)
  • Elspa (Faroese)
  • Lisabet/Lisbet (Faroese)
  • Elsebe/Elsche/Eske/Telsa (Frisian)
  • Bettina/Bettine (German: a borrowing from the Italian)
  • Elisa (German: a borrowing from Romance languages)
  • Elisabeth (German/Dutch)
  • Elise (German/Danish/Dutch/English/Norwegian: a borrowing from the French)
  • Elli (German: diminutive form, occasionally used as an independent given name)
  • Elsbeth (German/Swiss-German dialectical form)
  • Ilsa/Ilse (German/Dutch: initially a diminutive form, popularly bestowed as an independent given name, now considered dated. il-SEH)
  • Lies/Liesa/Liese (German/Dutch)
  • Liesel/Liesl (German: originally a diminutive form, used as an independent given name, now considered dated)
  • Lilli (German: originally a diminutive form, used as an independent given name due to its association with the flower)
  • Lisa/Lise (German/Dutch/English/Swedish/Danish/Norwegian)
  • Sabeth (German: obscure)
  • Aileisabaiþ (Gothic)
  • Elísabet (Icelandic)
  • Ellisif/Ellisiv (Norwegian)
  • Lieken, Lüke, Lücken (Plattdeutsch)
  • Bettan (Swedish: originally a diminutive form, occasionally used as an independent given name, but now considered dated)
  • Lisen (Swedish: originally a diminutive form, used as an independent given name)

German diminutive forms are Betti, Elis, Elli, Elschen, and Lieschen.

Slavic Forms
Forms used in Slavic speaking countries

  • Elisaveta Елисавета (Bulgarian)
  • Elizabeta (Croatian)
  • Alžběta (Czech: alzh-BYEH-tah)
  • Eliška (Czech: originally a diminutive form, used as an independent given. eh-LEESH-kah)
  • Elisabeti Елїсабеть (Old Church Slavonic)
  • Eliza (Polish: eh-LEE-zah)
  • Elżbieta (Polish: elsh-BYEH-tah)
  • Halszka (Polish: archaic. HAHLSH-kah)
  • Halżbieta (Polish: archaic. halsh-BYEH-tah)
  • Elizaveta/Yelizaveta Елизавета (Russian)
  • Jelisaveta (Serbian)
  • Alžbeta (Slovak)
  • Ažbeta (Slovene)
  • Betina (Slovene)
  • Elica (Slovene: originally a diminutive form, used as an independent given name. eh-LEET-sah)
  • Elisa/Elis (Slovene)
  • Elizabeta/Elizabet (Slovene)
  • Elza (Slovene)
  • Jelisava (Slovene)
  • Lizabeta (Slovene)
  • Špela (Slovene: originally a diminutive form, exclusively used as an independent given name. SHPEH-lah)
  • Hilža (Sorbian)
  • Lisaveta/Yelysaveta (Ukrainian)

Czech diminutive forms are Běta, Bětka, Bětuška, Betynka, Bětuše, Betyna, and Líza. Slovakian diminutives include: Beta, Betka, Betuška, Betinka, Betuša and Betina. Polish diminutive forms are Bieta, Ela (the most prevalent), Elka, Elunia and Elżunia. Slovene diminutives are: Beta, Beti, Betika, Ela, Eli, Elzi, Špelca, Špelica, Špelka, Jelica, Lili, and Lizika.

Baltic Forms
Forms used in the Baltic States

  • Eliisabet (Estonian)
  • Elts (Estonian)
  • Etti (Estonian)
  • Ilze (Estonian)
  • Liisa/Liisi/Liis (Estonian/Finnish)
  • Liisu (Estonian)
  • Eliisa (Finnish)
  • Elizabete (Latvian)
  • Līze/Lizina (Latvian)
  • Elžbieta (Lithuanian)
  • Eliissá/Liisá/Liissá (Saami)

Celtic Forms
Forms used in Celtic based languages

  • Elesbed (Breton)
  • Eilís (Irish: IE-leesh)
  • Ealisaid (Manx: ALE-is-sed)
  • Ealee (Manx)
  • Ealish (Manx)
  • Ealasaid (Scottish)
  • Elspeth (Scottish)
  • Bethan/Betsan (Welsh)

Other forms

  • Elizabeta (Albanian)
  • Ilizabith إليزابيث (Arabic)
  • Il-Shvai ܐܠܝܫܒܥ \ܐܠܝܫܒܚ (Aramaic)
  • Elsapet (Armenian)
  • Yeghisapet (Armenian)
  • Zabel (Armenian)
  • Elixabete/Elixabet/Elizabete (Basque: former are pronounced eh-LEE-sheh-BEH-tah and eh-LEE-shah-Bet)
  • Elixi (Basque: eh-LEE-shee)
  • Elisheba (Biblical Hebrew)
  • Eliso ელისო (Georgian)
  • Lizi (Georgian)
  • Elisavet Ελισαβετ(Greek: Modern)
  • Zeta (Greek: Modern)
  • Ilsipat (Greenlandic)
  • Elikapeka (Hawaiian)
  • Elisheva (Hebrew: see Hebrew script above)
  • Lizzamma (Hindi/Indian)
  • Erzsébet/Orzebet (Hungarian: ER-zhey-bet)
  • Aley/Aleyamma/Aleykutty (Malayalam)
  • Eli/Eliamma (Malayalam)
  • Elizabetta (Maltese)
  • Erihapeti (Maori)
  • Elizabet (Turkish)

Hungarian nicknames includes Bözsi, Erzsi (ER-zhee), and Zsóka (ZHO-kaw).

Medieval Forms
Forms no longer in usage from Medieval Europe

  • Ysabel/Ysabet (Catalan, Valencia, 16th-century)
  • Elisaued (Cornwall, England, 10th-century)
  • Elizabez (England, 13th-century)
  • Lylie/Lilion (England, 13th-century, possibly nicknames)
  • Elisota (England, 14th-century)
  • Elseby (Finland)
  • Isabelot (France, Paris, 13th-century)
  • Yzabé (France, Bordeaux, 15th-century)
  • Besina (14th-century Italy, Venice, possibly a diminutive form)
  • Isabetta (Italy, Florence 15th-century)
  • Bechte (Germany, 15th-century, most likely a diminutive form)
  • Beth (Germany, 15th-century, diminutive form)
  • Bettlin (Germany, 15th-century, probably a diminutive form)
  • Bytzel (Germany, 15th-century, diminutive form)
  • Els (Germany, 15th-century, diminutive form)
  • Elsslein (Germany, late 15th-century)
  • Elsslin (Germany, 15th-century, probably a diminutive form)
  • Eltzabet (Germany, late 15th-century)
  • Lyse (Germany, 15th-century, diminutive form)
  • Elsebeth (Germany, 15th-century)
  • Elzebeth (German, in Silesia, 14th-century)
  • Nele/Neleke (German, in Silesia, 14th-century, most likely than not, diminutive forms)
  • Elysant (Normandy, 1190)
  • Helisent (Normandy, 1221)
  • Isabellis (Normandy, 12th-century)
  • Ysabels/Yzabels/Yzabela (Occitan, Saint Flour, 14th-century)
  • Elitze (Sweden, 15th-century)
  • Elsika/Elsiko/Elzeke (Sweden, 15th-century)
  • Elsby/Elzeby (Sweden, 16th-century)
  • Aleseta (Switzerland, Sion, 14th-century)

Name-days are: November 17 and November 19.

Ingalill

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Swedish/Norwegian
(IN-ga-LIL)

The name is a smush of the Old Norse female name Inga and Lill which can either be in reference to the Swedish word lille meaning “little; small” or Lilly which is a Swedish form of Lily and a diminutive form of Elisabeth. The name was quite common in the 1940-50s, but is now considered rather dated in Scandinavia. The name is borne by Norwegian Politician Ingalill Olsen (b.1955) and its designated name-day in Sweden is October 25.