Himani

  • Origin: Sanskrit/Hindi हिमानी
  • Bengali: হিমানী
  • Meaning: “mass of collection of snow; snow drift.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pron: HEE-mah-NEE

The name comes directly from the Sanskrit word हिमानी meaning, “a mass of collection of snow; snow dirft.”

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Nishka

  • Origin: Sanskrit निष्क
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: NISH-kah

The name is derived from the Sanskrit निष्क (niska), which essentially means “gold coin,” “gold vessel” or “a gold pendant.” It can refer to a unit of measurement, which is the weight of gold equal to 18 or 15 Suvarṇas or karsa. It is defined in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha by Vasudeva, a compendium of Ayurverdic medicine and pharmacology.

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Nuralain, Noorulain

  • Origin: Arabic نور العين
  • Meaning: “light of the eye.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Arab pron (NOO-roo-LINE); Urdu pron (NOO-rul-en)

The name is composed of the Arabic words, nur نُور (light), ul-Ain عَين (the eye; spring, fountain), hence it could also take on the meaning of “light of the spring or fountain.”

Noorulain or Noor-ul-Ain is a common name among Indian Muslims and Pakistanis, though it is not necessarily a name with strong religious connotations in the Arabic-speaking world itself.

It is the name of the female protagonist in a popular Pakistani romantic drama series of the same name (2018).

The Noor-ul-Ain is the name of one of the largest pink diamonds in the world and the tiara it is mounted in, which was made for Empress Farah Pahlavi’s wedding in 1958.

Its Maghrebi forms are Noorelein, Noureleine, Noraleine, Nureleine & Nurelène which are sometime mistranslated by onomasticians as modern French or Flemish combinations of Nora & Madeleine, which may be the case in some instances.

Other transliterations include: Noor Alain, Nur Alain, Noor-ul-Ain, Nur-ul-Ain, Noraline, Noralin, Noralyn, Nour Elain, Nurelein, Nuraline, Nurelen, Nurelayne & Nuralyn.

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Jashan

  • Origin: Hindi जशन
  • Meaning: “festivities.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • Pronunciation: JAH-shahn

The name comes directly from the Hindi word जशन meaning, “festivities.”

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Vihana

  • Origin: Sanskrit विहाना
  • Meaning: “dawn; early morning.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • (vee-HAH-nah)

The name comes directly from the Sanskrit word विहान (vihana) meaning, “dawn; early morning.”

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Vyom

  • Origin: Hindi, Sanskrit व्योम
  • Meaning: “space; ether; firmament; heavens; sky.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • Pronunciation: VYOOM

The name comes directly from the Hindi word व्योम (vyom), which means, “space, ether, firmament, sky; heavens.” It is ultimately linked to the Sanskrit व्योमन् (vyoman) of the same meaning.

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Dhyana, Dhyani, Dhyan

Dhyana & Dhyani are unisex (pronounced TAH-nah & TAH-nee), ultimately derived from the Sanskrit ध्यान and meaning “meditation; attention.” Both concepts are applied in Buddhism and Hinduism.

An exclusive masculine form is Dhyan.

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Ajay

  • Origin: Sanskrit
  • Bengali: অজয়
  • Devangari: अजय
  • Gujarati: અજય
  • Hindi/Marathi: अजय
  • Kannada: ಅಜಯ್
  • Malayalam: അജയ്
  • Tamil: அஜய்
  • Telugu: అజయ్
  • Meaning: “invincible; unconquerable.”
  • Gender: masculine
  • Pronunciation: uh-JYE

The name is from the Sanskrit a अ (not) & jaya जय (victory).

The name appeared in the British Top 500 Male Names between 1996-2011, and peaked at #300 in 2003.

Other forms Ajai and Ajit.

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Duha

  • Origin: Arabic ضحى
  • Meaning: “forenoon.”
  • Gender: unisex
  • DOO-hah

The name comes directly from the Arabic word for forenoon or late morning. In Islam, it is used in reference to Salat ad-Duha صَلَاة الضحى‎‎, a voluntary prayer that is said between Fajr and Dhuhr and is used mainly for the atonement of sins.

It is also the name of the 93rd chapter in the Qu’ran, al-Ḍuḥā الضحى‎, (the Morning).

As a given-name, it is traditionally unisex, but has been more often bestowed on females.

Other forms include:

  • Duha Духа (Albanian, Arabic (standard), Bashkir, Bosnian, Chechen, Kazakh, Kurdish, Turkish)
  • Zuha ज़ुहा (Azeri, Hindi)
  • Doha, Dohaa للال چاشت (Bengali, Urdu)
  • Dhuha (Javanese, Malaysian)
  • Zoha ضحی (Persian)
  • Zuho Зуҳо (Tajik, Uzbek)

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Gauri

  • Origin: Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi गौरी
  • Meaning: “fair; light-skinned; white; brilliant.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: GORE-ee

The name comes directly from the Sanskrit word meaning “fair; light-skinned; white; brilliant.” In Hinduism, this is an epithet for the goddess Parvati in her Mahagauri form.

The Kannada and Tamil form is Gowri கௌரி (Tamil) & ಗೌರಿ (Kannada).

Gauri can also be a Finnish male form of the name Gabriel.

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