Angelica

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Latin
Meaning: “angelic.”
Eng (AN-jel-ik-ah), It/Pol (ahn-JAY-lee-kah); Germ (ahn-GAY-lee-kah); Sp (ahn-HAY-lee-lah) Swe/Nor (ahn-YAY-lee-kah); Fre (Pronunciation)

The name is derived from the Latin angelicus meaning “angelic” and is ultimately derived from the Greek, άγγελος (ángelos) meaning, “messenger.” The name was used by the 16th-century, Italian poets, Boiardo and Aristo for their Orlando poems, in which it is the name of Orlando’s love interest.

In England, Angelica has been used as a given name since the 18th-century.

Angelica is also the name of a type of herb.

As of 2010, Angelica stood as the 345th most popular female name in the United States, while the French form of Angélique came in as the 439th most popular female name in France, (2009) and the 627th most popular in the United States, (2010).

As of 2009, its Spanish form of Angélica was the 88th most popular female name in Mexico.

The name is borne by several saints, and was also borne by 18th-century Swiss painter, Angelica Kauffman (1741-1807). Other notable Angelicas include:

Italian opera singer, Angelica Catalani (1780-1849), Stand-in American First Lady, Angelica Van Buren (1818-1877), American nun and TV host, Mother Angelica (b.1923); Angelica Pickles, a popular cartoon character featured on the Rugrats; American actress, Anjelica Huston; Norwegian princess, Maud Angelica Behn (b.2003) .

The Latinate, Angelica form, is used in English speaking countries, Italy, Romania, Norway, Sweden and occasionally Poland. Other forms of the name include:

  • Angèlica (Catalan)
  • Angelika (Czech/Danish/German/Hungarian/Icelandic/Norwegian/Slovak/Swedish)
  • Angélique (French)
  • Anxélica (Galician)
  • Angeliki/Aggeliki Αγγελική (Greek: Modern)
  • Angyalka (Hungarian)
  • Angelíka (Icelandic)
  • Anjelica (Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Angelica/Angelika/Andżelika (Polish)
  • Anželika (Russian)
  • Angelìca (Sardinian)
  • Angelika Ангелика (Serbian)
  • Angélica (Spanish/Portuguese)

There is an Italian masculine form, which is Angelico, and the Late Latin masculine form, Angelicus.

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Minttu

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Finnish
Meaning: “mint.”

The name comes directly from the Finnish word for mint.

Its designated name-day is October 6.

The name is borne by Finnish actress Minttu Mustakaillo (b.1973). It is also the name of a popular Finnish peppermint-flavored liqueur, despite the liqueur associations, the name seems to be fairly common in Finland.

The Holidays aren’t too far off and if you due around that time and are considering a Holiday-themed name with a bit of an edge, this might be just what you are looking for.

Update: As of 2011, Minttu is the 43rd most popular female name in Finland.

Rosemary, Romy

Rosemary seems to have been coined in the 19th-century, either being taken from the name of the herb or used as a combination of both Rose and Mary.

In the case of the herb, it is derived from the Latin ros marinus which literally means “dew from the sea.”

The name seems to have been especially common among Irish-Catholic families as the rose is a symbol for the Virgin Mary.

Its popularity peaked in 1946 when it was the 75th most popular female name in the United States. As of 2010, it was 720th most popular female name.

Its Germanic form of Rosemarie has spawned the diminutive of Romy, now commonly used as an independent given name in the Netherlands. As of 2010, Romy was the 55th most popular female name in the Netherlands and the 202nd most popular in France (2008).

Source

  1. http://www.behindthename.com/name/rosemary

Vazul

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Hungarian
Meaning: “basil”

The name comes directly from the Hungarian word for the basil plant.

It is also sometimes used as a vernacular form of the Greek male name, Basil, which actually has a completely different etymology.

Its designated name-day is June 15.

Source

  1. http://www.behindthename.com/namedays/lists/6.php
  2. http://online.ectaco.co.uk/main.jsp?do=e-services-dictionaries-word_translate1&direction=2&status=translate&lang1=23&lang2=hu&source=vazul

Basil

Gender: Masculine

The name, coincidentally, has two different origins and meanings.

It could either be from the Greek, Vassilios, which in itself is derived from the Greek Βασιλειος (Basileos), meaning “king.” The words: basilica, basilisk and the name of the herb, Basil, share the same etymology.

The name was borne by Saint Basil the Great, a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea. He is considered the father of the early Christian Church among both Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholics.

In Russian Folklore, its feminine version of Vasilisa appears in a popular Russian fairytale, entitled Vasilisa the Beautiful, the tale shares similar features to the Western European Cinderella Story.

The designated name-day is often January 2.

Another etymology of the name is the Arabic باسل (Basil), which means “valiant” or “brave.”

Other forms of the first form, include:

  • Vasil (Bulgarian/Albanian)
  • Veselin (Bulgarian)
  • Bazilije (Croatian)
  • Basil/Bazil (Czech/Slovak)
  • Vasilij (Czech)
  • Pasi (Finnish)
  • Basile (French)
  • Breasal (Gaelic/Irish)
  • Basil/Basilius (German/Dutch)
  • Wassili (German)
  • Basileios Βασιλειος (Greek Ancient)
  • Vasílios Βασίλειος/Vasílis Βασίλης (Greek Modern)
  • Bazil (Hungarian)
  • Vászoly (Hungarian)
  • Vazul (Hungarian)
  • Basile/Basileo (Italian)
  • Basilio (Italian: most common form)
  • Basilius (Latin)
  • Basilijus/Bazilijus (Lithuanian)
  • Vasilii Василии (Old Church Slavonic)
  • Bazyli (Polish)
  • Bazylid/Bazylis (Polish)
  • Bazyliusz (Polish)
  • Wasyl/Wasyli (Polish: archaic forms)
  • Basílio (Portuguese)
  • Vasile (Romanian: Vasilica is a diminutive)
  • Baseli (Romansch)
  • Vasily Василий (Russian: Vaska and Vasya are usually the diminutives)
  • Basili (Sardinian)
  • Vasilije Василије (Serbian)
  • Vasil (Slovak)
  • Bazilij (Slovene)
  • Basilio/Basiléo (Spanish)
  • Vasyl Василь (Ukrainian)

Feminine forms include:

  • Vasilka Василка (Bulgarian)
  • Vasilena/Veselina (Bulgarian)
  • Vesela (Bulgarian)
  • Veliki (Croatian)
  • Basilissa (Greek Ancient/Romansch)
  • Vasiliki Βασιλικη (Greek Modern)
  • Basilia (Italian)
  • Basilea/Basiliola (Italian)
  • Bazilė (Lithuanian)
  • Bazyla/Bazylia/Bazylisa (Polish)
  • Vasilisa Василиса (Russian)
  • Vasylyna Василина (Ukrainian)

Rūta

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Lithuanian/Latvian
Meaning: “rue.”
(ROO-tah).

The name has a very similar sound to Ruth but is actually derived from the Lithuanian word for the rue plant, albeit, it is occasionally used as a cognate for Ruth, (see Ruth).

Its name day in Latvia is July 31.

Mádara

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Latvian
Meaning: “cleavers.”
(MAH-duh-ruh)

This sweet, exotic and uber feminine, Baltic gem, is derived from the Latvian plural word meaning, “cleavers”, a type of flowering plant indigenous to Latvia.

In ancient Baltic folk medicine, the plant was used to cure and treat skin diseases and other ailments. The name has inspired a Latvian cosmetics company. Mádara, which is an eco-based brand of cosmetics, differs from other European cosmetic chains as it claims to use 100% natural plants indigenous to the Baltic countries.

The name is also a very popular Latvian first name.

Its designated name day in Latvia is July 29.