January Names

JanuaryI thought at the beginning of each month, I would post a list of names associated with the that particular month. Below is a list of names I have previously written about associated with January

 

Agnes: January 21st is the feast of St. Agnes and according to folklore, on January 20th, which John Keats’ was inspired to write a poem about, unmarried girls are supposed to see a future glimpse of their husband in their dreams the night before, provided they do not eat that day.

Frost: January is often associated with cold temperatures and frosty weather. Here are some name associated with frost

Sarma, Sarmite: These 2 Latvian lovelies come directly from the Latvian word for hoarfrost. The latter is pronounced sar-MEE-teh.

Kirsi: This Finnish female name is associated with the cherry fruit but also means “frost” in Finnish.

Other names that mean “frost” or words for frost from other languages include:

Male

  • Antizgar (Basque)
  • Dér (Hungarian)
  • Hall (Estonian)
  • Reif (German)
  • Rijp (Dutch)
  • Rio (Manx)
  • Šerkšnas (Lithuanian)
  • Sioc (Gaelic)
  • Szron (Polish, SHRONE)
  • Barrug (Welsh)

Female

  • Blancada (Occitanian)
  • Brina (Italian)
  • Bryma (Albanian)
  • Chelata (Aragonese)
  • Geada (Portuguese)
  • Gelada (Catalan)
  • Eláda (Guarani)
  • Escarcha (Spanish)
  • Jinovatka (Czech)
  • Pruina (Latin)
  • Salna (Latvian)
  • Slana (Slovenian)

Snow: Also one of the snowiest months of the year, some names that mean “snow.”

Other names meaning snow that I have yet to write about include

Male

  • Erc’h (Breton)
  • Jur (Chuvash)
  • Kar (Turkish)
  • Lov (Erzya)
  • Nix (Latin)
  • Yas (Navajo)

Female

  • Dëbora (Albanian)
  • Fiòca (Piedmontese)
  • Kavi (Faroese)
  • Neige (French)
  • Neva (Neapolitan)
  • Neve (Galician/Italian)
  • Parsla (Latvian)

Ice, the following are names that mean “ice”

Male

  • Buz (Turkish)
  • Izotz (Basque)
  • Jég (Hungarian)
  • Led (Czech, Serbo-Croatian)
  • Păr (Chuvash)
  • Siku (Inupiak)
  • Ledas (Lithuanian)
  • Ledus (Latvian)
  • Tin (Navajo)
  • Xeo (Galician)
  • Ysbran

Female

  • Cetl (Nahuatl)
  • (Welsh)
  • Ma’ome (Cheyenne)

Epiphany: January 6th officially marks the end of the Christmas season, when the Magi finally were able to locate the Christ child and bestow gifts upon him.

Garnet is the birthstone of January. Below is a list of words from other languages that mean “garnet” and would make awesome names

  • Gernete (Anglo-Norman)
  • Granate (Asturian/Basque/Spanish)
  • Grenat (French)
  • Gairnéad (Gaelic)
  • Granato (Italian)
  • Granatas (Lithuanian)
  • Granada (Portuguese)

Likewise, Carnation is the birthflower, its Latin name is Dianthus, which was a name before it was a flower. Below is a list of words from other languages that mean “carnation” and would make awesome names. Also mixed in are some names with the meaning of “carnation” or just have carnation associations

  • Diantha
  • Clavel (Asturian/Spanish)
  • Krabelin (Basque)
  • Clavellina (Catalan)
  • Havenellike (Danish)
  • Caraveleira (Galician)
  • Landnelke (German)
  • Nellika (Icelandic)
  • Caxtillān (Nahuatl)
  • Penigan (Welsh)

And for boys, other than Dianthus, there is the Italian Garafano

The Chinese plum is the flower emblam for Spring, in Chinese it is called Meihua and its Japanese name is Ume. In Korean it is called Maesil and Vietnamese it is called Mai.

In Japan, the flower emblem for January is the Camellia

Another January birthflower is the snowdrop

  1. Çeçpĕl (Chuvash)
  2. Sněženka (Czech)
  3. Perce-Neige (French)
  4. Endzela (Georgian)
  5. Bucaneve (Italian)
  6. Snieguole (Lithuanian)
  7. Śnieżyczka (Polish)
  8. Sněgulka (Sorbian)
  9. Kardelen (Turkish)
  10. Eirlys (Welsh)

The Zodiac signs associated with January are Capricorn and Aquarius. Capricorn means goat and Aquarius waterbearer. Some names that mean both

The ruling planet of Capricorn and Aquarius is Saturn, so Saturnina or Saturnin/Saturnino are also names to consider.

Finally, here are names that mean “January,” some come directly from words, others are a translation of the Latin male name Januarius.

Male

  • Chinero (Aragonese)
  • Xineru (Asturian)
  • Urtarril (Basque)
  • Genver (Breton/Cornish)
  • Gener (Catalan)
  • Kărlach (Chuvash)
  • Ghjennaghju (Corsican)
  • Leden (Czech)
  • Znêr (Emiliano-Romagnolo)
  • Janvier (French)
  • Zenâr (Friulian)
  • Xaneiro (Galician)
  • Gennaro (Italian)
  • Jenero (Ladino)
  • Januarius (Latin)
  • Sausis (Latvian)
  • Jannar (Maltese)
  • Genièr (Occitanian)
  • Yenner (Pennsylviana German)
  • Janeiro (Portuguese)
  • Bennàlzu (Sardinian)
  • Enero (Spanish)
  • Ocak (Turkish)
  • Lonawr (Welsh)

Female

  • Jenna (Bavarian)
  • January (English)
  • Tammikuu (Finnish)
  • Janvière (French)
  • Gennara (Italian)
  • Januaria (Latin)
  • Zennâ (Ligurian)
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New Year, New Names

new-year-2018-eve-greetingTo help usher in the New Year, here are some baby names that mean “new” or have some sort of association with the New Year.

Male

  • Arata “new; fresh” (Japanese)
  • Athanaric “year of power” (Old German)
  • Gēar “year” (Anglo-Saxon)
  • Navin “new” (Sanskrit)
  • Neo “new” (Greek)
  • Primo “first” (Italian)
  • Ro’y “year” (Guarani)
  • Silvester/Sylvester, used as the term for New Year’s Day in many European countries as this was the feast of St. Sylvester

Female

  • Dagny “new day” (Old Norse)
  • Estraine “new year” (Anglo-Norman)
  • Gabonzahar “New Year’s Eve (Basque)
  • Mara “year” (Aymara)
  • Nova “new” (Latin)
  • Novella “little new one” (Latin)
  • Oighrigh “new speckled one” (Gaelic) pronounced OY-rik
  • Prima “first” (Italian)
  • Nochevieja “New Year’s Eve” (Spanish)
  • Noitevella “New Year’s Eve” (Galician)
  • Renef “New year” (Anglo-Norman)
  • Réveillon “New Year’s Eve” (French)
  • Silvestra/Sylvestra, used as the term for New Year’s Day in many European countries as this was the feast of St. Sylvester

Iara

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Tupi
Meaning: “lady of the water.”
(YAH-rah)

The name is found in Tupi legend as the name of a type of mermaid creature. The Iara are believed to live in bodies of freshwater. When they know a man is near they sing in order to trap them. Once in her power, there is nothing that can stop a man from falling in love with the her. Usually they marry her and go live with the Iara in her underwater kingdom, until they die, and since the Iara is immortal, she goes back to the world to find another man to take as her husband.

According to one Tupi legend, Iara was a warrior woman and was considered the best warrior in her tribe. Her brothers became jealous of her and plotted to kill her in her sleep, but Iara learned of their plans before they could kill her so she ended up killing them. As punishment, her father sent her off to a lake where she was transformed into a mermaid, now known as a Iara, and became immortal.

Iara has become a fairly common female name in both Brazil and Argentina. She is currently the 36th most popular female name in Argentina, (2009).

Fernanda and Ferdinand

Origin: German
Meaning: “brave journey”

Ferdinand is composed of the Germanic elements, farði (journey) and nanð (brave; courageous).

The name was first introduced into Iberian Peninsula by the Visigoths and from there it entered into the Spanish royal lines. Interestingly enough, it did not become common in Germanic countries until the 16th-century, when the Habsburg gained control over Spain. The name was very popular among Spanish royalty and later with the Hapsburgs.

Ferdinand is the progenitor of the common Spanish surnames Fernandez and Hernandez.

Its feminine form of Fernanda is currently the 10th most popular female name in Chile, the 15th most popular in Mexico and the 341st most popular in the United States, (2010). While its contracted Hungarian form of Nándor is currently the 67th most popular male name in Hungary, (2010).

Other feminine forms include:

  • Fernande (French)
  • Ferdinanda (German)
  • Ferdinande (German)
  • Ferdinandine (German)
  • Fernandia (German)
  • Ferdinanda (Italian)
  • Fernanda (Italian/Portuguese/Spanish)
  • Winanda (Polish)
  • Hernanda (Spanish)

Masculine forms include:

  • Fernandu (Asturian)
  • Hernandu (Asturian)
  • Erlantz (Basque)
  • Errando (Basque)
  • Pernando (Basque)
  • Perrando (Basque)
  • Ferrà (Catalan)
  • Ferran (Catalan)
  • Ferdinand (Czech/French/German)
  • Veeti (Finnish)
  • Veerti (Finnish)
  • Veertinantti (Finnish) 
  • Fernand (French)
  • Fernandel (French: obsolete)
  • Ferrand (French: obsolete)
  • Fernán (Galician)
  • Fridunanth (Gothic)
  • Fernandó (Guarani)
  • Fernandío (Guarani)
  • Ferdinánd (Hungarian)
  • Nándor (Hungarian)
  • Ferdinando (Italian)
  • Fernando (Italian/Spanish)
  • Nando (Italian)
  • Fernandu (Leonese)
  • Nandu (Leonese)
  • Ferdinandas (Lithuanian)
  • Fridenand (Old High German)
  • Ferdynand (Polish)
  • Winand (Polish)
  • Fernão (Portuguese)
  • Hernando (Spanish)
  • Hernán (Spanish)
A common German short form is Ferdy.