Garance

Gender: Feminine
Origin: French
Meaning: “madder; rose madder.”
(gah-RAWns)

The name comes directly from the French word for the madder plant and is also used in French to describe a particular shade of red which roughly translates as, “rose madder.”

The name first appeared in the Revolutionary Calendar of the 18th-century, sharing a name-day with Flora.

As of 2010, Garance was the 127th most popular female name in France.

The name appeared in the film Les Enfants du paradis (Children of Paradise) as the name of a central character, directed by Marcel Carné (1945)

It is borne by French blogger, Garance Doré.

Hanae

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Japanese 花え。
Meaning: “flower painting.”
Jap (HAH-nah-AY)

The name is composed of the Japanese characters, hana (花) “flower” 絵 (e) meaning, “picture.”

As of 2010, Hanae was the 146th most popular female name in France. Its recent usage in France may be due to the Japanese fashion designer, Hanae Mori.

Camellia

Gender: Feminine
Origin: English

From the name of the flowering shrub which gets its name from the botanist who first classified it, Georg Josef Kamel.

The name has been used in France since at least the 18th-century.

As of 2010, its French form of Camélia was the 156th most popular female name in France.

Other forms include:

Camélia (French)
Camelia (English/Romanian)

The designated name-day in France in October 5.

The name is currently borne by French pop singer, Camélia Jordana (b.1992).

Source

  1. http://www.behindthename.com/name/camellia

Élodie

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Germanic
Meaning: debated
Fre (ay-lo-DEE); Eng (EL-o-DEE)

The name is of debated origin and meaning but is possibly derived from the Germanic elements ala meaning “other; foreign” and od meaning “riches, wealth.” Other sources list it as a derivative of the Franconian al-ôd meaning “inheritance, estate; property.”

It was also the name of an ancient Nubian kingdom and one of the first kingdoms to become Christian and is the name of a species of aquatic plant, also spelled Elodea.

The name was popularized by a 9th-century Spanish saint who was martyred with her sister Nunilona. In the 1980s, Élodie was very popular in France. In 2000, she ranked as high as # 39, now she only ranks in as the 215th most popular female name in France, (2010). But, she may sound fresh and appealing to anglophone parents; if you are curious as to how to best pronounce this in English, think Melody sans M.

Elodie has had some history of usage in the United States, though very sparse. She appears in the census records as early as the 18th-century; most Elodies seems to have been located in Louisiana, (no surprise there). Other interesting variations which appear in the American census records include: Eloda, Eloida, Elodia, and Elodi.

She appears in the U.S. top 1000 3 times, once in 1881, 1883 and then again in 1886. She has not been seen since.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Elodi (Basque)
  • Alòdia (Catalan)
  • Elodia (Corsican/Spanish)
  • Elodie (English)
  • Eloida (English)
  • Lodi (French: diminutive form)
  • Alodia (Italian/Polish/Spanish)
  • Aloida (Latvian)
  • Alodija/Aliodija (Lithuanian)
  • Alódia (Portuguese)

The name was borne by Elodie Lawton Mijatović (1825-1908) a British-Serbian author known for her books on Serbian history and culture as well as her prolific works translating books from Serbian-English and English-Serbian.  It is also borne by French actress Élodie Bouchez-Bangalter (b.1973), French singer Élodie Frégé (b.1982) and French-Canadian radio personality Élodie (Didi) Gagnon

Masculine forms include Alodius and Alodiusz (Polish).

Nasrin

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Persian نسرین‎
Meaning: “wild rose.”
(nahz-REEN)

The name comes from the Persian word for the wild rose, and is used throughout the former Persian Empire.

As of 2010, its Maghrebin form of Nesrine was the 248th most popular female name in France.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Nesrine (Algerian/Moroccan/Tunisian)
  • Nesrin (Azeri/Kurdish/Turkish)
  • Nasrine (Comorian)
  • Nasrin (Pashtun/Persian/Tajik/Uzbek)
  • Nasreen (Urdu)

Roman

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Latin
Meaning “Roman.”
Eng Masc. (ROH-men) Eng Fem. (roh-MANE); Fre Masc. (hroh-MAHn); Fre Fem. (hroh-MEHN); Pol (ROH-mahn)

The name’s meaning is clear from its very first utterance, most renowned in the State’s through Polish director and film maker, Roman Polanski, it was the name of a Christian martyr who died under Diocletian.

In recent years, the name has had a peak in popularity, it currently ranks in as the 157th most popular male name in the United States (2011), and seems to be rising.

His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 36 (Romain, Belgium, 2008)
  • # 39 (Romain, France, 2010)
  • # 228 (Roman, France, 2010)
  • # 494 (Netherlands, 2011)

Its designated name-days are: February 23 (Slovakia); February 28/29 (Poland), May 28 (Estonia), August 9 (Czech Republic/Poland), October 6/23 (Poland), November 18 (Poland).

Roman is used in Czech, Estonian, German, Polish, Slovakian and Slovenian.

Other forms of the name are:

  • Roman Роман (Croatian/English/German/Norwegian/Polish/Romansch/Russian/Slovak/Slovene/Swedish/Ukrainian)
  • Romain (French)
  • Romanos (Greek)
  • Román (Hungarian/Spanish)
  • Romano (Italian)
  • Romanello/Romanino (Italian: obscure)
  • Romanus (Latin)
  • Romanas (Lithuanian)
  • Reman (Poitvin)
  • Romans (Poitvin)
  • Rouman (Poivin)

In Polish, Romek is the diminutive form.

Feminine forms are:

  • Romana (Croatian/Czech/Italian/Lithuanian/Polish/Slovak/Slovene)
  • Romaine (English/French)
  • Romane (French)
  • Romána (Hungarian)
  • Romanella (Italian)
  • Romanina (Italian)
  • Romanita (Italian/Spanish)
  • Romina (Italian/Spanish)
  • Romanela (Polish: very obscure)

Hortense

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Latin
Meaning: “garden.”
Eng (HORE-tense); Fre (or-TAWNS)

In the English-speaking world, she is considered being one of the most hated baby names, on par with Bertha and Beulah; but at one time, Hortense was very much-loved in the United States, and she is still favored abroad.

Hortense appeared in the U.S. top 1000 between 1880 and 1941. The highest she ranked within those years was at # 375 in 1903. By 1942, she disappeared from the U.S. top 1000 never to be seen again.

Though the sound in contemporary English may not be so pleasant, Hortense has many redeemable qualities. She is derived from the Roman family name, Hortensius, which is derived from the Latin, hortus, meaning, “garden.” Hence horticulture! Her Latin derivative shares its name with the scientific designation of the hydrangea plant. Hortensia is also the name of a type of pear.

Hortense sounds completely different in French, in fact, it sounds rather pleasant. She appears in the French top 500 coming in as the 335th most popular female name in 2010.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Hortenzie (Czech)
  • Hortense (French/English)
  • Hortensia (German/Latin/Romansch/Portuguese/Spanish)
  • Hortenzia (Hungarian/Romanian/Slovak)
  • Ortensia (Italian)
  • Ortenzia (Italian)
  • Ourtense (Poitvin)
  • Hortensja (Polish)

Notable bearers include:

  • Hortensia (circ. 4th-century BCE) the daughter of Quintus Hortensius Hortalus she is known for her gifted speech which she gave before the Roman Triumvirate regarding  the taxation of wealthy Roman women.
  • Hortensia von Moos (1659-1715) a Swiss female doctor known for her early philosophical writings on women. Today she is a symbol of the modern Swiss Women’s Movement.
  • Hortense Mancini (1646-1649), a mistress of King Charles II of England .
  • Hortense de Beauharnais (1783-1837), daughter of Josephine Bonaparte and step-daughter of Napoleon Bonaparte.
  • Hortense Haudebourt-Lescot (1784-1845) a French painter.
  • Hortense Schneider (1833-1920), a famous French soprano.

Lilian

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Latin
Meaning: “lily.”
Fre (Pronunciation)

Not to be confused with the feminine English name, Lillian, though they share the same etymology, Lilian has always been a male name in France, its feminine form being Liliane.

Lilian is derived from the Latin lilium (lily).

As of 2010, Lilian was the 78th most popular male name in France.