Eirlys

  • Origin: Welsh
  • Meaning: “snowdrop.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: AYRE-lis

The name comes directly from the Welsh word for “snowdrop,” a type of flower known as galanthus. The word itself is composed of the Welsh words, eira (snow) & llys (vegetable; herb).

The galanthus flower is known to flower in February.

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Faaria, Faria, Farya

  • Origin: Arabic فارعة
  • Meaning: “lofty; tall; towering; slender; slim; beautiful; handsome; pretty.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: Arabic: fah-REE…AH; Urdu: FAR-yah

The name is derived from the Arabic word فَارِع (fari) which can mean “tall; lofty” and also “slim; slender” as well as “beautiful; handsome; pretty.” It is derived from the Arabic verbal root ف ر ع (f-r-‘) meaning, “to ascend.” The same root shares is also related فَرْع‎ (farʿ), meaning “tree branch; hair; mountain top; upper part,” which is why some websites list it as meaning, “beautiful hair.”

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Fiddah, Fizzah, Fizziyah

  • Origin: Arabic فِضَّة
  • Meaning: “silver.”
  • Gender: female
  • Phonetic Pronunciation Standard Arabic: FEED-dah; Spoken Arabic: FEEZ-zah
  • IPA: /fidˤ.dˤa/

The name comes directly from the Arabic word فِضَّة (fiddah), meaning “silver”, it is sometimes transliterated as Fizzah.

Another form is Fizziyah فِضِّيَّة, which means “silvery.” Also transliterated as Fiddiyah.

Fizzi فِضِّي is a unisex variation.

It is the same word in Maltese, but spelled Fidda. It is not used as a given-name in Malta, but may hypothetically make a nice Maltese female name since it is already used as a legitimate Arabic female name in other parts of the world.

Other forms include:

  • Fidah (Malay)
  • Fedha (Swahili)

Other transliterations include: Feda, Fedda, Fedha, Feza, Fezza, Fidda, Fida & Fidha.

Sources

Himani

  • Origin: Sanskrit/Hindi हिमानी
  • Bengali: হিমানী
  • Meaning: “mass of collection of snow; snow drift.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pron: HEE-mah-NEE

The name comes directly from the Sanskrit word हिमानी meaning, “a mass of collection of snow; snow dirft.”

Sources

Llinos

  • Origin: Welsh
  • Meaning: “linnet; finch.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Approx Phonetic Pronunciation: (she-nose)
  • (North Wales) IPA:ˈɬɪnɔs/
  • (South Wales) IPA: /ˈɬiːnɔs/, /ˈɬɪnɔs/

The name comes directly from the Welsh word for the linnet or finch bird.

The name came first into use in Wales in the 1880s. It is sometimes listed as a unisex names on other sites, but I have not come across any records of this being used on males in my own research. It was likely a name that came into use when Welsh revivalism became popular in the late 1800s, however, its use could have hypothetically been used in Medieval or pre-Christian Wales, I just cannot locate records indicating such.

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Loredana

  • Origin: Italian
  • Meaning: unknown
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pron: (LOH-ray-DAH-nah)

The name is of uncertain origin or meaning, but has been attested in Venice since the 16th-century. It was the name of Loredana Marcello (d. 1572), the wife of Doge Mocenigo of Venice. It is suspected to be derived from the surname, Loredan, which was the family name of a noble family in the Republic of Venice. According to legend, they derived their name from the Latin Laureati, Lauretani (laureled), owing to the idea that they descended from “fame and glory.”

The name went from being an obscure regional name to a popular name throughout Italy due to Luciano Zuccoli’s novel, L’amore di Loredana (1908). It was also used earlier by French author George Sand in her novel, Mattea (1833), but the name never became widespread in the French-speaking world.

At the turn of the 20th-century, when it first became popular in Italy, it may have been used by devout Catholic families, especially in the South of Italy, who mistakenly believed it referenced, Loreto, as in Our Lady of Loreto.

The designated name-day in Italy is December 10th.

The name is also used in Albania, Romania, Slovenia and the other former Yugoslav countries.

Slovenian forms include: Loridina, Lorica (loh-REET-sah) & Lorka.

An obscure Italian variation is Oredana and the masculine Oredano.

The French form is Lorédane and its masculine form of Lorédan.

Italian short forms include: Dana, Lora & Lori.

There is an Italian masculine form, though rare, which is Loredano and also the Croatian, Lordan.

It is borne by Swiss female rapper of Albanian descent, known simply as Loredana (b. 1995).

Sources

Mishika

  • Origin: Sanskrit मिषिका
  • Meaning: “spikenard; Nardostachys Jatamansi.”
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pron: (MEE-shee-kah)

The name comes directly from the Sanskrit word for the plant Nardostachys Jatamansi, known as “spikenard,” a plant endemic to the Himalayas.

Sources

Nectar, Nectaire, Nectarius, Nectaria

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: “nectar.”

Nectar is the English form of the Greek Nektarios Νεκτάριος, which is derived from νέκταρ (nektar), meaning “nectar, the drink of the gods. Nectar is not a name that has ever been in common use in the English-speaking world, but since it is the name of several Eastern and Western Christian saints, the proper English male translation of the name would be Nectar; or it would have appeared thus in the calendar.

It was borne by St. Nectaire of Auvergne, a 4th-century Christian missionary to the Gauls in what is now the Massif Central region of France. According to Gregory of Tours, he was sent by Pope Fabian, along with his brothers, where he transformed a temple that was dedicated to Apollo on Mont Cornadore into a cathedral that still stands, and was subsequently beheaded by the local Gaulic chieftain. The commune of Saint-Nectaire in the Puy-de-Dôme department of France gets its name from him, as does the cheese of the same name; or the latter technically comes from the Marshal of Senneterre, which is a linguistic corruption of Saint-Nectaire.

Male forms include:

  • Nektarij, Nektary Нектарий (Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian)
  • Nectari (Catalan)
  • Nektarious (Coptic)
  • Nectarije (Croatian-Serbian)
  • Nectar (English)
  • Nectaire (French)
  • Nektari ნეკტარი (Georgian)
  • Nektarios Νεκτάριος (Greek)
  • Nettario (Italian)
  • Nectareus, Nectarius (Late Latin)
  • Nektārijs (Latvian)
  • Nektariusz (Polish)
  • Nectário (Portuguese)
  • Nectarie (Romanian)
  • Nectario (Spanish)

Feminine forms include

  • Nektaria, Nektarija Νεκταρία Nექთარიჯა Нектария (Coptic, Bulgarian, Georgian, Greek, Polish, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Ukrainian)
  • Nectarie (French)
  • Nettaria (Italian)
  • Nectaria (Latin, Romanian, Spanish)
  • Nectária (Portuguese)

A modern male Greek diminutive form is Nektary and the Russian diminutive form for both the male and female form is Nechka.

Sources

Nishka

  • Origin: Sanskrit निष्क
  • Gender: feminine
  • Pronunciation: NISH-kah

The name is derived from the Sanskrit निष्क (niska), which essentially means “gold coin,” “gold vessel” or “a gold pendant.” It can refer to a unit of measurement, which is the weight of gold equal to 18 or 15 Suvarṇas or karsa. It is defined in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha by Vasudeva, a compendium of Ayurverdic medicine and pharmacology.

Sources

Erlis, Erlisa

  • Origin: Albanian
  • Meaning: “scent of the oak.”
  • Pron (AIR-lees; air-LEE-sah)

Erlis is an Albanian male name which is composed of the Albanian words, erë (wind, scent) and lis (oak).

Erlis is also used as a male name in Kyrgyzstan, being a borrowing from the Albanian from Soviet times.

Its feminine form is Erlisa.

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