Tristan

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Celtic
Meaning: “tumult; riot.”
Eng (TRIS-ten)

The name is derived from an ancient Pictish name, Drust, which is derived from the Celtic element, drest, meaning, “tumult; riot.”

The name later came to be associated with the Latin tristis (sad) and hence often took on the meaning of “sorrowful.”

Drust was borne by several Pictish kings, including the last King of the Picts, Drust X. Historically, the name is often latinized as Drustanus.

In medieval legend, the name was borne by an envoy of King Mark of Cornwall, who ends up falling in love with Isolde, the King’s betroved.

Currently, Tristan is the 87th most popular male name in the United States, (2011). His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 35 (Canada, BC, 2010)
  • # 47 (Denmark, 2010)
  • # 52 (Belgium, 2008)
  • # 56 (France, 2010)
  • # 75 (Slovenia, 2010)
  • # 147 (the Netherlands, 2011)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Tristan (Breton/Dutch/English/French/German/Icelandic/Norwegian/Polish/Slovene/Swedish/Welsh)
  • Trystan (Cornish/Welsh)
  • Dunstan (English)
  • Tristram (English)
  • Tristano (Italian)
  • Tristaino (Italian)
  • Drustanus (Late Latin)
  • Drest/Drust (Pictish)
  • Tristão (Portuguese)
  • Tristán (Spanish)
  • Drystan (Welsh)

Feminine forms include the English Trista, the Italian Tristana and the obscure French, Tristane.

Sources

  1. http://www.behindthename.com/php/find.php?name=tristan
  2. http://www.askoxford.com/firstnames/tristan?view=uk

Corentin

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Breton/French
Meaning: debated
(Pronunciation)

Corentin is a franconized form of the Breton male name, Kaourentin, which is possibly related to the Breton word, kaour, meaning, “help.” Other possibilities include kar (friend) or karent (parent), or even the Celtic, korventenn, meaning, “hurricane.”

The name was borne by one of the seven founding saints of Brittany. He is revered as the patron saint of Seafood as it is believed he subsisted on a miraculous fish that would regrow its body parts every time the saint cut off a piece.

As of 2010, Corentin was the 64th most popular male name in France.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Kaourentin (Breton)
  • Corentyn (Cornish)
  • Corentin (French)
  • Corentino (Italian)
Feminine forms include: Corentine (French) and Kaourentina (Breton).

Gertrude

James C. Christensen

Gender: Feminine
Origin: German
Meaning: “spear strength.”
Eng (GER-trood); Ger (ger-TROO-də)

She has adorable nickname options; Trudy, among others. She has a similar feel to other current vintage trend-setters such as Matilda and Eleanor, yet Gertrude, for the most part remains unloved. Like Hildegard and Brynhild, this is one of those names where I often ask myself: why not?

She is strong, vintagy and no-frills, as mentioned before, she has tons of adorable nickname options. Is she really anymore grandmotherly or old sounding than Emma, Eleanor, Matilda or even Abigail? We have gotten used to hearing these names but I remember a time when the above names were considered “too old” until it took one famous person to use them and voila, they are automatically endearing and trendy.

Ok, I’ll get off my high horse and get onto the what the name is really all about.

Portrait of Gurtruydt van Leyden.
by James C. Christensen via http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/saintsandangels/17.htm

Gertrude is composed of the Germanic roots, ger (spear) and þruþ (strength).

The name was borne by several illustrious medieval women, two of whom are saints. Gertrude of Nivelles (626-659) is revered as the patron saint of cats! I am not quite sure how she came to be known as a feline patron, but she was the daughter of Pepin I and was supposed to be married off at the age of ten, but steadfastly refused, insisting that she would only marry Christ. After the death of her father, her wealthy mother constructed Gertrude her very own convent, making her the abbess. She is also invoked against mice and rat infestations.

Another Gertrude is Gertrude the Great (1256-1302) a German nun, mystic and great theologian of her time.

The name has been borne by German and Dutch royalty alike.

Gertrude is pretty well-known in the English-speaking world, but actually never experienced much usage. It was introduced into England in the 15th-century by Dutch settlers, where it was ocassionally used. It appears in Shakespeare’s Hamlet (1600) as the name of the hero’s mother.  It was used sparingly in the United States at the beginning of the 20th-century, possibly being introduced by German immigrants. The highest it ever ranked was in 1898 coming in as the 573rd most popular female name.

In the United States, its most famous bearer is Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), famous writer and poet.

As of 2011, her Finnish form of Kerttu was the 20th most popular female name in Finland and Geertruida came in as the 491st most popular female name in the Netherlands, (2010). Meanwhile, its Dutch diminutive offshoot of Geertje is the 368th most popular female name in the Netherlands, (2010).

Other forms of the name include:

  • Gartred (Cornish)
  • Gertruda (Croatian/Czech/Lithuanian/Polish/Romansch/Slovene)
  • Geerdina (Dutch)
  • Geertje (Dutch)
  • Ge(e)rtruida (Dutch)
  • Geertrui (Dutch)
  • Gertrude (Dutch/English/French/German/Italian/Platdeutch)
  • Trudy (Dutch/English/German)
  • Truus (Dutch)
  • Kelli (Estonian)
  • Kertu (Estonian)
  • Kärt (Estonian)
  • Ge(i)rtrúð (Faroese)
  • Gortra (Faroese)
  • Jertru (Finnish)
  • Jerttu (Finnish)
  • Järtty (Finnish)
  • Kerttu (Finnish)
  • Kerttuli (Finnish)
  • Gesa (Frisian)
  • Gesche (Frisian/Platdeutsch)
  • Geesche (Frisian)
  • Gesina (Frisian)
  • Gerta (German)
  • Gertraud (German)
  • Gertrud (German/Scandinavian/Romansch)
  • Gertrúd (Hungarian)
  • Jerta (Hungarian)
  • Geirþrúður (Icelandic)
  • Jarþrúður (Icelandic)
  • Geltrude (Italian)
  • Gertrūda (Latvian)
  • Gjertrud (Norwegian)
  • Jartrud (Norwegian)
  • Geretrudis (Old High German)
  • Geirþrúðr (Old Norse)
  • Jarþrúðr (Old Norse)
  • Gertrudes (Portuguese)
  • Gearte (Sami)
  • Kearte (Sami)
  • Gertrúda (Slovak)
  • Trudla (Sorbian)
  • Gertrudis (Spanish)
  • Gardrud (Swedish)
  • Gertru(n) (Swedish)
  • Hjertrud (Swedish)

Common German and English short forms are Gertie and Trudi/Trudy.

Artwork

Anna, Anne

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Biblical Hebrew
Meaning: “grace.”
(ANN; AHN). (ANN-uh; AHN-nah). (HANN-uh; HAHN-nah)

Anne is possibly one of the quintessential classic English and French female names. Prior to the 18th-century, it seems that every other girl born in England was either named Anne, Jane or Mary. There were several British and French queens who bore this simplistic moniker, including the ill fated Anne Boleyn, the mother of Elizabeth I. The history of Anne is rather long and complicated.

It was foremost popularized through the cult of St. Anne, a legendary figure who was said to be the mother of the Virgin Mary and the grandmother of Christ.

In Brittany, the name became especially popular because it happened to coincide with the name of an ancient Celtic goddess, her cult being replaced by St. Anne’s. In fact, it was borne by one Breton Princess, Anne of Brittany.

The name was introduced into Britain by the French-Normans after the invasion in 1066. Previously, there had been a minor Saxon king named Anna, but in this case the name is related to the Saxon arn (eagle). Anna and Anne are still occasionally used as male given names in Friesland.

Other than the apocryphal saint, the name Anne can be traced directly back to the Bible. In the New Testament, it is the name of a prophetess who predicts the Crucifixion of Christ.

Anna (Αννα), is the Greek translation of the early Hebrew Channah חַנָּה, usually transliterated as Hannah, meaning “grace.”

Hannah is borne in the Old Testament by the faithful mother of the prophet, Samuel.

Hannah has always been popular among Jewish families, but was virtually unheard of among non-Jews before the Reformation, except in some cases where it may have been used as a diminutive form of Johanna, spelled Hanna.

It was the Byzantines who had introduced the Anna form to the world, making it popular throughout Eastern and Southern Europe. It was a very popular name among the Byzantine royal family and it was borne by the majestic Anna of Byzantium.

Anna may be the more melodic form of the bunch, but Anne’s minimalistic qualities are charming. Short, to the point, no frills. It’s not a bad name, though it does lack some spice, which is why parents are probably more attracted to its more exotic alternatives. In fact, Anne only comes in at # 608 in the top 1000 female names of the United States. It is safe to say, however, that she is very much loved in the middle name spot.

Anna is currently one of the most popular female names in Europe and abroad. Her rankings are as follows:

  • # 1 (Austria, 2010)
  • # 1 (Estonia, 2011)
  • # 2 (Hungary, 2010)
  • # 3 (Ana, Georgia, 2010)
  • # 3 (Iceland, 2010)
  • # 4 (Ana, Croatia, 2010)
  • # 4 (Czech Republic, 2010)
  • # 4 (Germany, 2011)
  • # 4 (Ukraine, 2010)
  • # 5 (Faroe Islands, 2010)
  • # 5 (Ana, Portugal, 2010)
  • # 6 (Armenia, 2010)
  • # 6 (Ane, Greenland, 2002-2003)
  • # 6 (Ana, Romania, 2009)
  • # 6 (Ana, Serbia, 2010)
  • # 7 (Latvia, 2011)
  • # 7 (Russia, 2011)
  • # 8 (German-speaking Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 9 (Denmark, 2011)
  • # 10 (Netherlands, 2010)
  • # 10 (Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 10 (Norway, 2010)
  • # 11 (Italy, 2010)
  • # 12 (Ireland, 2010)
  • # 14 (Poland, 2010)
  • # 16 (Catalonia, 2010)
  • # 26 (Canada, B.C., 2010)
  • # 28 (Italian-speaking Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 28 (United States, 2010)
  • # 29 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 40 (France, 2009)
  • # 46 (French-speaking Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 53 (Belgium, 2009)
  • # 63 (England/Wales, 2010)
  • # 71 (Australia, 2010)
  • # 81 (Sweden, 2010)
  • # 83 (Spain, 2010)
Other forms of the name include:
  • Anneen (Afrikaans/Low German)
  • Anna Анна (Afrikaans/Albanian/Armenian/Breton/Bulgarian/Catalan/Corsican/Czech/Dutch/English/Estonian/Faroese/Finnish/French/Frisian/German/Greek/Hungarian/Icelandic/Italian/Latvian/Limburgish/Maltese/Polish/Russian/Ukrainian/Scandinavian/Slovak)
  • Anne (Basque/Dutch/English/French/Scandinavian)
  • Gánna Га́нна (Belarusian)
  • Annaig (Breton)
  • Annick (Breton)
  • Maina (Breton)
  • Mannaig (Breton)
  • Mannick (Breton)
  • Naig (Breton)
  • Ana Ана ანა (Bulgarian/Croatian/Galician/Georgian/Lombard/Macedonian/Portuguese/Romanian/Samogaitian/Serbian/Slovene/Spanish/Venetian)
  • Jana (Croatian/Ladino)
  • Aneta (Czech/Polish/Samogaitian/Slovak)
  • Aina (Catalan)
  • Anica (Croatian/Serbian/Slovene)
  • Ane (Danish)
  • Anika (Danish)
  • Anneke (Dutch)
  • Anneken (Dutch)
  • Annika (Dutch/Finnish/German/Latvian/Scandinavian)
  • Anka (Dutch/Frisian/German)
  • An(n)ke (Dutch/Frisian)
  • Anouk (Dutch/French)
  • Ans (Dutch)
  • Enneke (Dutch)
  • Enneken (Dutch)
  • Anita (English/German/Polish/Spanish)
  • Annette (English/French/German)
  • Anissa (English)
  • Annelle/Annella (Estonian)
  • Anete (Estonian/Latvian)
  • Anett (Estonian)
  • Anu (Estonian)
  • Anni (Finnish)
  • Annikki (Finnish)
  • Anniina (Finnish)
  • Annukka (Finnish)
  • Niina (Finnish)
  • Anaïs (French/Provençal)
  • Annouche (French)
  • Ninette (French)
  • Ninon (French)
  • Ninouk (French)
  • Anje (Frisian)
  • Ankea (Frisian)
  • Antje (Frisian)
  • Antjen (Frisian)
  • Anute (Fruilian)
  • Anano (Georgian)
  • Annchen (German)
  • Annel (German)
  • Annele (German/Latvian)
  • Anneli(e) (German/Finnish/Swedish)
  • Annet (German)
  • Anina (German)
  • Anja (German/Slovene)
  • Anouschka (German/Italian/Russian)
  • Annaki (Greek)
  • Annoula (Greek)
  • Noula (Greek)
  • Anikó (Hungarian)
  • Annuska (Hungarian)
  • Panni (Hungarian)
  • Áine (Irish)
  • Ánna (Irish)
  • Annarella (Italian)
  • Annella (Italian)
  • Annetta (Italian)
  • Annettina (Italian)
  • Nona (Italian/Romansch)
  • Ance (Latvian)
  • Annija (Latvian)
  • Anninya (Latvian)
  • Ona (Lithuanian)
  • Annamma (Malayalam)
  • Annam (Malayalam)
  • Onnee (Manx)
  • Âone (Norman)
  • Aenna/Aenne (Old High German)
  • Annehe (Old High German)
  • Änna/Änne (Old High German)
  • Neta (Piedmontese)
  • Noto (Piedmontese)
  • Anke (Plattdeutsch)
  • Anneke(n) (Plattdeutsch)
  • Analia (Romansch/Spanish)
  • Annina (Romansch)
  • Annotta (Romansch)
  • Anca (Romanian)
  • Anicuta (Romanian)
  • Anėta (Samogaitian)
  • Anėkė (Samogaitian)
  • Annag (Scottish)
  • Ghianna (Sicilian)
  • Janna (Sicilian)
  • Nanna (Sicilian)
  • Anniken (Swedish)
  • Ann (Welsh)
  • Nan (Welsh)
  • Nanno (Welsh)
  • Nanw (Welsh)
  • Aana (Wolof)
As for the Hannah forms

Hanna without an H is the prefered form on Continental Europe, usually pronounced (HAHN-nah) and in French like Anna. Hanna and Hanne (HAHN-neh) are also used as diminutive forms of Johanna/Johanne in the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Germany. There is the Hungarian Hajna pronounced (HOY-no). The Czech/Slovak form of Hana nickname Hanka. There are the Yiddish forms of Heyna, Hayna, Hejna (all pronounced like HAY-nah) including the diminutive forms of HenaHende, Hendel and Henye.  The Polish diminutive form of Hania, which might make an interesting alternative to Anya or Hannah. Hannah, Hanna and Henna are all used in the Middle East.

Of course, how could we ever forget the popular diminutive forms of Annie and Nan.

Paul

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Latin
Meaning: “short; small; humble; few.”
Eng (PAWL)

The name is derived from the Latin Roman family name, Paulus, which could translate as meaning, “small, short; humble; few.”

Paul and his various forms has to be one of the most common male names used throughout the Christian world. It has been used equally among Orthodox Christians, Roman Catholics and Protestants.

Its most famous bearer was Paul of Tarsus, whose real name was Saul. St. Paul, as referred to by the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches, is attributed as being the author of much of the New Testament.

The name was borne by several popes, royals and saints thereafter.

Currently, its Germanic form of Paul is the 8th most popular male name in Germany, (2011). His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 13 (Austria, 2010)
  • # 22 (France, 2009)
  • # 41 (Romania, 2009)
  • # 90 (Ireland, 2010)
  • # 130 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 178 (United States, 2010)
  • # 485 (Netherlands, 2010)
His foreign equivalents rankings are as follows:
  • # 3 (Pablo, Spain, 2010)
  • # 4 (Páll, Faroe Island, 2010)
  • # 4 (Pau, Catalonia, 2010)
  • # 17 (Paweł, Poland, 2010)
  • # 26 (Pablo, Chile, 2010)
  • # 29 (Pavel, Czech Republic, 2010)
  • # 31 (Pablo, Catalonia, 2010)
  • # 44 (Pau, Spain, 2010)
  • # 91 (Pál, Hungary, 2010)
  • # 144 (Pablo, France, 2009)
  • # 202 (Paolo, France, 2009)
  • # 361 (Pablo, United States, 2010)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Pali (Albanian)
  • Paulë (Albanian)
  • Boulos/Bulos بولس (Arabic)
  • Faulus (Aramaic)
  • Boghos Պողոս (Armenian)
  • Poghos Պողոս (Armenian)
  • Paul (Basque/Dutch/English/Estonian/German/French/Romanian/Scandinavian/Silesian)
  • Paweł Павeл (Belarusian/Polish)
  • Polus (Berber)
  • Paol (Breton)
  • Pavel Павел (Bulgarian/Czech/Russian/Slovene)
  • Pavolo (Calabrian)
  • Pavulu (Calabrian)
  • Pau (Catalan/Occitanian)
  • Pawl (Cornish/Welsh)
  • Paulu (Corsican/Sardinian/Sicilian)
  • Pavao (Croatian)
  • Pavle პავლე Павле (Croatian/Georgian/Macedonian/Serbian)
  • Pavo (Croatian)
  • Palle (Danish)
  • Poul (Danish)
  • Pauwel (Dutch)
  • Paavel (Estonian)
  • Paavo (Estonian/Finnish)
  • Páll (Faroese/Icelandic)
  • Paavali (Finnish)
  • Pauli (Finnish)
  • Pol (Flemmish/Romansch)
  • Paale (Frisian)
  • Pals (Frisian)
  • Paulus पौलुस (Frisian/Hindi/Latin)
  • Pay (Frisian)
  • Powles (Frisian)
  • Pouw (Frisian)
  • Pauli (Fruilian)
  • Pódhl (Gaelic)
  • Pól (Gaelic)
  • Paulo (Galician)
  • Pavlos Παυλος (Greek)
  • Pāl पॉल (Hindi)
  • Pál (Hungarian)
  • Pósa (Hungarian)
  • Paolo (Italian/Portuguese)
  • Paolino (Italian/Portuguese)
  • Paulinus (Latin)
  • Pāvils (Latvian)
  • Paulius (Lithuanian)
  • Povilas (Lithuanian)
  • Paol (Lombard)
  • Paulose (Malayalam)
  • Pawl (Maltese)
  • Pawlu (Maltese)
  • Payl (Manx)
  • Paora (Maori)
  • Pål (Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Pavel (Romanian)
  • Paulin (Romansch)
  • Polet (Romansch)
  • Polin (Romansch)
  • Pulegn (Romansch)
  • Pàl (Scots-Gaelic)
  • Pawůł (Silesian)
  • Pavol (Slovak)
  • Pawoł (Sorbian)
  • Pablo (Spanish)
  • Paoro (Tahitian)
  • Pàul (Tuscan)
  • Pavlo Павло (Ukrainian)

For a Reference a Female forms See Paula and Paulina (soon to come)

Jenna

The name could either be from the Cornish form of Jane or from the Finnish which is a contraction of Johanna. The name exploded in popularity in the 1980s due to its similarity to the popular Jennifer. Currently, Jenna is the 94th most popular female name in British Columbia, Canada, (2010). Her rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 141 (United States, 2010)
  • # 201 (the Netherlands, 2010)
  • # 328 (France, 2010)
Currently, the name is borne by former First Daughter, Jenna Bush Hager (b.1981).

Source

  1. http://www.behindthename.com/name/jenna-1

Saintly Sunday

Since I have been behind in my posts, I thought my readers deserved an extra feature this weekend. Saints names. Sure, we are all familiar with Bernadette, Margaret Mary, Theresa, Peter and Luke, but the Catholic Church’s Calender of Saints offers us a huge variety of unique names, whether you are Catholic, Orthodox or just looking for an interesting name to bestow upon your child, the below list offers a wide range of unique yet very legitimate names.

Each name of the saint is divided by nationality (m) stand for Male while (f) stands for Female.

Some interesting Saint’s name that might be of interest to the expectant parent:

Armenian

  • Arsen (m)
  • Barak (m)
  • Beemen (m)
  • Khoren (m)
  • Mamwell (m)
  • Mesrob (m)
  • Narek (m)
  • Nouneh/Nune (f)
  • Pakos (m)
  • Yeprem (m)

Breton

  • Azenor (f)
  • Canna (f)
  • Clervie (f)
  • Derrien (m)
  • Enora (f)
  • Fragan (m)
  • Gobrien (m)
  • Gwenfrewi (f)
  • Kirio (m)
  • Koupaïa (f)
  • Maclou (m)
  • Mael (m)
  • Malo (m)
  • Milio (m)
  • Morwenna (f)
  • Noyala/Noyale (f)
  • Nolwenn (f)
  • Onenne (f)
  • Peran (m)
  • Rittan (m)
  • Samzun (m)
  • Trillo (m)
  • Urielle (f)

Bulgarian

  • Astion (m)
  • Boyan (m)
  • Kamen (m)
  • Kiril (m)
  • Naum (m)
  • Raiko (m)

Catalan

  • Eulàlia (f)
  • Just (m)
  • Ot (m) (might make a cool one syllable middle name)
  • Pacian (m)
  • Sever (m)

Cornish

  • Austell (m)
  • Brychan (m)
  • Burian (f)
  • Croidan (m)
  • Endellion (f)
  • Keyne (f)
  • Kigwe (f) KIG-wee
  • Levin (m)
  • Mabyn (f)
  • Marwenna (f)
  • Minver (f)
  • Newlina (f)
  • Salom (m)

Croatian

  • Kvirin (m)

Danish

  • Ansgar (m)
  • Thøger (m)

Dutch

  • Aleydis (f)
  • Alina (f)
  • Falco (m)
  • Godelieve (f)

Egyptian

  • Abanoub (m)
  • Abraam (m)
  • Ashraf (m)
  • Bishoi (m)
  • Demiana (f)
  • Lot (m)
  • Paisi (f)
  • Pamin (m)
  • Piama/Piamun (f)
  • Potamina (f)
  • Maysoon (f)
  • Samia (f)
  • Talida (f)

English

  • Alban (m)
  • Anselm (m)
  • Averil (f)
  • Bede (m)
  • Billfrith (m)
  • Birin (m)
  • Boswell (m)
  • Britwin (m)
  • Caedmon (m)
  • Credan (m)
  • Day (m)
  • Dotto (m)
  • Dunstan (m)
  • Ebba (f)
  • Elstan (m)
  • Enswith (f)
  • Eskil (m)
  • Fursey (m)
  • Ina (f)
  • Ivo (m)
  • Lewina (f)
  • Merwinna (f)
  • Modwen (f)
  • Odo (m)
  • Osana (f)
  • Rumon (m)
  • Sanctan (m)
  • Sebbi (m)
  • Swithun (m)
  • Sythe (f)
  • Tanco (m)
  • Tetta (f)
  • Tibba (f)

French

  • Bond (m)
  • Céronne (f)
  • Césarie (f)
  • Cloud (m)
  • Dreux (m)
  • Emérance (f)
  • Evronie (f)
  • Fare (f)
  • Faustine (f)
  • Fingen (m)
  • Gauthier (m)
  • Gibrien (m)
  • Grimonie (f)
  • Harvey (m)
  • Ismérie (f)
  • Julienne (f)
  • Meldon (m)
  • Namadie (f)
  • Néomaye (f) ney-oh-may
  • Noémoise (f) no-ey-mwahz
  • Pepin (m)
  • Quitterie (f) pronounced keet-teh-hree
  • Reine (f)
  • Ségolène (f)
  • Solange (f)
  • Soline (f)
  • Tressan (m)
  • Vigor (m)
  • Vitaline (f)
  • Wivine (f)

Galician

  • Aldara (f)
  • Gonzalo (m)
  • Paio (m)

German

  • Afra (f)
  • Alto (m)
  • Ambet (f)
  • Anno (m)
  • Attalia (f)
  • Bardo (m)
  • Benno (m)
  • Brito (m)
  • Coloman (m)
  • Cordula (f)
  • Hazeka (f)
  • Odilia (f)
  • Oranna (f)
  • Roswitha (f)
  • Sturm (m)

Greek

  • Anastasia (f)
  • Anthusa (f)
  • Anysia (f)
  • Apollos (m)
  • Basilissa (f)
  • Calliope (f)
  • Cleopatra (f)
  • Emmelia (f)
  • Ephraim (m)
  • Jerome (m)
  • Lybe (f)
  • Menodora (f)
  • Myrope (f)
  • Nicon (m)
  • Orestes (m)
  • Photine (f)
  • Philemon (m)
  • Philo (m)
  • Philothea (f)
  • Theone (f)
  • Timon (m)

Hungary

  • Emeric
  • Laszlo

Irish

  • Balin (m)
  • Becan (m)
  • Benen (m)
  • Brogan (m)
  • Caimin (m)
  • Cainder (f)
  • Ciara (f)
  • Coca (f)
  • Colman (m)
  • Conall (m)
  • Cormac (m)
  • Dallan (m)
  • Dymphna (f)
  • Edana (f)
  • Ermina (f)
  • Fedelma (f)
  • Finian (m)
  • Fintan (m)
  • Foila (f)
  • Ita (f)
  • Kenan (m)
  • Kennera (f)
  • Kilian (m)
  • Kinnia (f)
  • Lelia (f)
  • Loman (m)
  • Macallan (m)
  • Macartin (m)
  • Machai (m)
  • Mella (f)
  • Modan (m)
  • Monessa (f)
  • Odran/Odrian (m)
  • Phiala/Piala (f)
  • Scottin (m)
  • Thomian (m)
  • Trea (f)
  • Trien (m)

Italian

  • Aldobrandesca (f)
  • Archanegla (f)
  • Asteria (f)
  • Bacco (m)
  • Caio (m)
  • Carissima (f)
  • Caro (m)
  • Celestina (f)
  • Chiara (f)
  • Dulcissima (f)
  • Fina (f)
  • Fosca (f)
  • Franca (f)
  • Giovina (f)
  • Grata (f)
  • Gaudenzia (f)
  • Gemma (f)
  • Messalina (f)
  • Nereo (m)
  • Nilo (m)
  • Panacea (f)
  • Pierina (f)
  • Oronzo (m)
  • Rocco (m)
  • Romola (f)
  • Sofronia (f)
  • Verdiana (f)
  • Vilana (f)
  • Vincenza (f)
  • Zita (f)

Latin/Roman

  • Asella (f)
  • Caius (m)
  • Cassius (m)
  • Cyra (f)
  • Dafrosa (f)
  • Emiliana (f)
  • Fabiola (f)
  • Flavia (f)
  • Galla (f)
  • Juliana (f)
  • Julitta (f)
  • Lucian (m)
  • Marana (f)
  • Marcellina (f)
  • Martial (m)
  • Maximus (m)
  • Montanus (m)
  • Pastor (m)
  • Prisca (f)
  • Serapia (f)
  • Vissia (f)

Lebanese

  • Appian (m)
  • Charbel (m)
  • Habib (m)
  • Rafka (f)
  • Sabas (m)

Polish

  • Aniela (f)
  • Faustina (f)
  • Michalina (f)
  • Salomea (f)

Portuguese

  • Alexandrina
  • Jacinta

Romanian

  • Calinic (m)
  • Theotim (m)

Scottish

  • Blane (m)
  • Conwall (m)
  • Kennera (f)
  • Kevoca/Quivoca (f)
  • Nathalan (m)
  • Rule (m)
  • Thanea (f)
  • Thaneva (f)

Spanish

  • Amunia (f)
  • Aurea  (f)
  • Casilda (f)
  • Florentina (f)
  • Garcia (m)
  • Inigo (m)
  • Madrona (f)
  • Marciana (f)
  • Millán (m)
  • Oria (f)
  • Orosia (f)
  • Pelayo (m)
  • Soledad (f)
  • Urbicio (m)

Welsh

  • Aled (f)
  • Baglan (m)
  • Brannock (m)
  • Cai (m)
  • Caian (m)
  • Crallo (m)
  • Dwynwen (f)
  • Elined (f)
  • Eiliwedd (f)
  • Kanten (m)
  • Madoc (m)
  • Madrun (f)
  • Maelrhys (m)
  • Melangell (f)
  • Teilo (m)
  • Tysilio (m)

Ugandan

  • Kizito (m)

So, which country offers the coolest selection of saint’s names?

Sources

  1. http://chrsouchon.free.fr/saintsbe.htm
  2. http://www.britannia.com/bios/saints/
  3. http://www.paradoxplace.com/Photo%20Pages/UK/British%20History/English_Saints_&_Kings.htm
  4. http://celticsaints.org/
  5. http://www.skete.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/product.display/product_id/1516/index.cfm
  6. http://www.catholic.org/saints/stindex.php
  7. http://www.catholic.org/saints/

Peter

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Greek
Meaning: “rock.”
Eng (PEE-ter)

The name is derived from the Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning, “rock.”

The name is found in the New Testament as a vernacular translation for the Aramaic Cephas (rock) a nickname designated to the Apostle Simon Bar-Jonah by Jesus. He is known as St. Peter, and Catholics traditionally attribute him as being the first Pope.  Among other denominations, he is considered to be one of Christ’s most prominent apostles.

Due to the associations with the apostle, Peter became an extremely prevalent male name throughout the Christian world.

The name seems to have been in usage in England since early times, but became especially popular after the Norman invasion. During this period, the form of Piers was preferred, being gradually replaced in popularity by Peter over the centuries.

Currently, Peter is 191st most popular male name in the United States, (2009). He has been steadily declining in the United States for the past 10 years, in 2000 he ranked in at # 125. His rankings in other countries, however, has not faltered. His rankings including his vernacular forms are as follows:

  • # 7 Pedro (Brazil, 2009)
  • # 9 Petar (Bulgaria, 2008)
  • # 15 Petr (Czech Republic, 2009)
  • #38 Pierre (France, 2006)
  • # 3 (Greenland, 2003-2004)
  • # 8 (Hungary, 2008)
  • # 33 Petur (Iceland, 2008)
  • # 70 (Ireland, 2008)
  • # 25 Pietro (Italy, 2007)
  • # 8 Pēteris (Latvia, 2005)
  • # 9 Petar (Macedonia, 2006)
  • # 10 Piotr (Poland, 2008)
  • # 3 (Slovakia, 2004)
  • # 59 (Slovenia, 2005)
  • # 50 Pedro (Spain, 2008)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Petrus (Afrikaans/Dutch/German/Indonesian/Latin/Limburgish/Plattdeutsch/Swedish)
  • Pieter (Afrikaans)
  • Pjetër/Pjetri (Albanian)
  • Ṗeṭros ጴጥሮስ (Amharic/Ethiopian)
  • Pero (Aragonese)
  • Bedros/Pedros Պետրոս (Armenian)
  • Botros/Boutros/Butros بطرس (Arabic/Coptic)
  • Pedru (Asturian/Konkoni)
  • Pyotr (Azeri)
  • Betiri (Basque)
  • Kepa (Basque)
  • Peio (Basque)
  • Peru (Basque)
  • Petri (Basque)
  • Piatro Пятро (Belarusian)
  • Piotr Пётр (Belarusian/Polish)
  • Pêr (Breton)
  • Pierrick (Breton)
  • Penko Пенко (Bulgarian)
  • Petar Петар (Bulgarian/Croatian/Macedonian/Serbian)
  • Pere (Catalan)
  • Peder (Cornish/Danish/Lombard/Norwegian)
  • Petru (Corsican/Romanian/Sicilian)
  • Pyè (Creole)
  • Pero (Croatian/Serbian)
  • Petar Петар (Croatian/Macedonian/Serbian/Slovene)
  • Petr (Czech)
  • Pelle (Danish/Norwegian/Swedish: originally a diminutive, now occasionally used as an independent given name. PEL-le)
  • Peer (Danish/Dutch/German)
  • Per (Danish/Faroese/Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Peter (Danish/Dutch/English/German/Luxembourgish/Norwegian/Slovak/Swedish)
  • Peeter (Estonian)
  • Peiru (Extramadura)
  • Pætur/Petur (Faroese)
  • Patras پطرس (Farsi)
  • Pekka (Finnish)
  • Petteri (Finnish)
  • Petri (Finnish)
  • Pietari (Finnish)
  • Pierre (French)
  • Piter/Pier/Pit (Frisian)
  • P’et’re პეტრე (Georgian)
  • Petros Πέτρος (Greek)
  • Pathros (Hindi)
  • Péter (Hungarian)
  • Petres (Hungarian)
  • Peto (Hungarian)
  • Pétur (Icelandic)
  • Peadar (Irish-Gaelic)
  • Pietro (Italian/Albanian)
  • Petronius (Latin)
  • Pēteris (Latvian)
  • Petras (Lithuanian)
  • Pir (Luxembourgish)
  • Petre Петре (Macedonian/Romanian)
  • Pathrose (Malayalam)
  • Pietru (Maltese)
  • Peddyr (Manx)
  • Petera (Maori)
  • Petter (Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Pèir/Pèire/Pèr (Occitanian)
  • Pedro (Portuguese/Spanish)
  • Pêro (Portuguese: archaic)
  • Pidru (Quecha)
  • Peadar/Peader/Peder/Peidar/Peider (Romansch)
  • Pyotr Пётр (Russian)
  • Pedru/Perdu/Pretu (Sardinian)
  • Peadar/Peadair (Scottish-Gaelic)
  • Pyjter/Piter (Silesian)
  • Pětr (Sorbian)
  • Petero (Swahili)
  • Pär (Swedish)
  • Pethuru (Tamil)
  • Raayappar (Tamil)
  • Petro Петро (Ukrainian)
  • Piter (Uzbek)
  • Piero (Venetian)
  • Piitre (Vöro: an Eastern Estonian dialect)
  • Pedr (Welsh)

In French, Pierre is used in a number of compound names. Some of the most common include:

Some common Italian compound names include: Piergiuseppe, Pietropaolo, Pierpaolo, Pietrantonio, Pierantonio, Pierluigi , Piergiorgio , Pietrangelo, Pierangelo, Pierce, Pierfrancesco, Piermaria and Piersilvio

Its feminine form of Petra was once a very popular name in German-speaking countries, but is now considered rather dated. Throughout Central Europe, however, she is experiencing a strong trend. Her current rankings are as follows:

  • # 46 (Czech Republic, 2009)
  • # 9 (Hungary, 2008)
  • # 46(Slovenia, 2005)

Feminine forms include:

  • Peta (Afrikaans/English)
  • Penka Пенка (Bulgarian)
  • Petra(Bulgarian/Croatian/Czech/Dutch/Finnish/German/Greek/Hungarian/Scandinavian/Serbian/Slovak/Slovene/Spanish)
  • Petrina (Croatian/German)
  • Pernille (Danish/Norwegian)
  • Petrea (Danish)
  • Petrine (Danish/German/Norwegian)
  • Petronella (Danish/Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Pietronella (Dutch)
  • Parnel/Pernel (English: archaic)
  • Peronel (English: archaic)
  • Petronel (English: archaic)
  • Petriina (Finnish)
  • Pernelle (French)
  • Pernette (French)
  • Péroline (French)
  • Péronelle (French)
  • Perrenotte (French)
  • Perrette (French)
  • Perrine (French)
  • Pétronelle (French)
  • Peyronne (French)
  • Pierrine/Pierrette (French)
  • Pétronille (French)
  • Peekje (Frisian)
  • Peterke (Frisian)
  • Petje (Frisian)
  • Petke (Frisian)
  • Pierke/Pierkje (Frisian)
  • Pieterke (Frisian)
  • Pietje/Piertje (Frisian)
  • Petrónia (Hungarian)
  • Petronia (Italian/Latin/Polish)
  • Petronilla (Italian/Latin)
  • Piera/Pierina (Italian)
  • Pieretta (Italian)
  • Pieruccia (Italian)
  • Pietra/Pietrina (Italian)
  • Pietruccia (Italian)
  • Petronela (Polish/Romanian)
  • Petrona (Spanish)
  • Pernilla (Swedish)

Italian female compound forms include: Pierangela and Pieranna.

Common German pet forms are: Pedi, Petzi and Pezi

The designated name-days are: April 29 (Hungary) and June 29 (Hungary, Germany, Slovakia, Sweden).

Sources