Colman, Colmán, Coleman

St. Colman.jpgOrigin: Gaelic
Meaning: “dove”
Gender: masculine
Ir. (kole-MAHN); Eng. (KOLE-men)

The name comes directly from the Gaelic word colmán (dove). The name was borne by numerous early Irish saints and several Irish kings.

Colman has never appeared in the U.S Top 1000, but its English offshoot, Coleman, has. Coleman has been in the U.S. Top 1000 Most Popular Male Names since 1900. It peaked in 1903, coming in as 360th most popular male name. In 2016, it was the 963rd most popular male name.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Coleman (English)
  • Colman (French/English/Hungarian)
  • Colmano (Italian/Spanish)
  • Colomà (Catalan)
  • Coloman/Koloman (Dutch/German)
  • Colomano (Italian)
  • Kolman/Koloman (Polish)
  • Kolonat (German)

Sources

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Wren

wren.jpgThe name comes directly from the name of a type of bird. Its English name is from the Anglo-Saxon wrenna, which is of uncertain meaning.

The bird was often referred to as the King of Birds in Medieval Folklore and it was considered bad luck to cause any harm to the nests.

In Ireland, Wren’s Day (December 26, St. Stephen’s Day), is celebrated by parading a fake wren on a pole. The Celebration most likely has pagan Celtic roots, but according to Christian legend the wren exposed the hiding spot of St. Stephen before he was stoned to death.

As a female name, it seems to have a modern feel, but records indicate that she has been in use since the 17th-century.

The name is often listed as unisex on many baby name sites, but its usage as a male name throughout history is actually sporadic and was rarely used for males. Its earliest usage as a male name is recorded around the 18th-century, probably used in honour of the surname of the same meaning.

In the United States, Wren first entered the U.S. Top 1000 in 2013 and has risen in popularity each year since then. In 2016, Wren was the 524th most popular female name in the United States. The name has yet to make an entry in the U.S. Top 1000 Most Popular Male Names. In England/Wales the name ranks even higher, coming in as the 334th most popular female name (2016).

Another form is Wrenna. A common affectionate form is Wrenny.

Sources

 

Calliope

Origin: Greek
Meaning: beautiful voiced
Gender: Female
Pronunciation: kuh-LIE-uh-pee

The name is composed of the Greek elements, καλλος (kallos) “beauty” and οψ (ops) “voice.” It is borne in Greek mythology by the muse of epic poetry and eloquence. She was said to be the mother of Orpheus and was said to be the chief among the muses by Hesiod and Ovid.

The name is also borne by a Catholic and Christian Orthodox saint who was tortured and martyred for refusing a suitor who wanted her hand in marriage as well as for her to renounce her faith.

It is also the name of a type of musical instrument as well as genus of hummingbird.

In recent years, it is the full name of a fictional character on the popular tv series, Grey’s Anatomy, Callie Torres, portrayed by Sara Ramirez.

In the English-speaking world, the name first came into use in the early 18th-century.

The name recently entered the U.S. Top 1000 Female Names, coming in as the 939th most popular female name.

A common short form is: Callie.

Other forms include:
Kalliope Կալլիոպե(Armenian/Danish/Dutch/Finnish/German/Estonian/Norwegian/Polish/Romanian/Swedish)
Kalіё́pa Каліё́па(Belarusian)
Kaliopa Калиопа(Bulgarian/Serbo-Croatian/Slovenian)
Cal·líope (Catalan)
Kalliopé (Czech/Hungarian/Slovak)
Calliope (French/English/Italian)
K’aliop’e კალიოპე (Georgian)
Kalliόph Καλλιόπη (Modern Greek)
Kallíópa (Icelandic)
Kaliopė (Lithuanian)
Calíope (Portuguese/Spanish)
Kalliopa Каллиопа(Russian/Ukrainian)

Sources

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calliope
https://www.behindthename.com
https://www.familysearch.org
https://www.ssa.gov
http://www.theoi.com

Mavis

MavisThe name is derived from a poetic English term for the song thrush, which is the name of a type of bird found in various breeds across Eurasia and Europe, especially England. The song thrush is known for its distinctive vocals and was kept as a house pet in 19th-century Europe. The word itself first entered the English language about 1400 and is ultimately from the Old French mauvis, which itself is possibly of Breton or Spanish origins. In modern French, this bird is now known as La Grive musicienne.

As a female given name, Mavis is first recorded in England in the late 16th-century, but became more widespread after Marie Corelli used it for the protoganist in her 1895 novel “The Sorrows of Satan.”

In the United States, the name peaked in popularity in 1927 coming in as the 270th most popular female name. The name fell off the U.S. Top 1000 in 1963. Oddly enough, the name has suddenly reappeared in the U.S. Top 1000 after over 50 years, coming in as the 789th most popular female name of 2016. It’s sudden resurgence seems to be a mystery, but is perhaps following along the coat-tails of other popular vintage names such as Lillian, Violet, and Emma.

Sources

https://www.behindthename.com/name/mavis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Song_thrush
https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=mavis
https://www.ssa.gov/cgi-bin/babyname.cgi

Robin

Gender: Masculine
Origin: English/French
Eng (RAH-bin); Fre (hroh-BAHn); Swe (ROH-bin)

Though the name has become increasinly feminine over years, and is now considered somewhat of a “mom” name, Robin is currently a fashionable male name in several countries.

Robin is a Middle English diminutive form of RobertIt is often associated with Robin Hood of Legend. Robin has been used as an independent given name since at least the 19th-century. Its usage on females began in the 1930s, (most likely being influenced by the bird). It first entered the top 1000 for females in 1932. The highest it ranked for females was in in 1962/1963 when it was consecutively the 25th most popular name for girls in the United States. Despite its popularity on females in the 60s, Robin did not fall out of the U.S. top 1000 for boys during those years. The highest he ever ranked was in 1956 when it was the 147th most popular male name. As of 2011, Robin does not rank in the U.S. top 1000 for either males or females.

His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 45 (France, 2010)
  • # 60 (Belgium, 2008)
  • # 61 (Netherlands, 2011)
  • # 83 (Sweden, 2011)

An obscure Scottish feminine form is Robina.

Linda

Gender: Feminine

1. Origin: German
Meaning: “soft; tender”
Линда

2. Origin: Spanish
Meaning: “pretty”

3. Origin: Estonian
Meaning: “bird.”

In the English-speaking world, the name is most likely derived from the ancient Germanic element, linde, meaning, “soft; tender.”

Its popularity between the 1940s-1950s may have been due to its associations with the Spanish adjective, linda which means “pretty.” However, the name is not really used in Spanish-speaking countries.

In Estonian, the name has a completely different etymology and history. It appears in the Estonian national epic, the Kalevipoeg, where it is the name of the protagonist’s mother. In this case, the name is most likely derived from the Estonian word lind, meaning “bird.”

Between 1947-1952, this was the most popular female name in the United States, as of 2010, it ranked in as the 623rd most popular female name. Her rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 393 (France, 2009)
  • # 456 (Netherlands, 2010)

The name is also used in Czech, German, the Scandinavian languages, Finnish, Italian, Hungarian, Latvian, Slovak and in Bulgarian.

Designated name-days are: February 13 (Hungary), April 15 (Finland), April 30 (Latvia), June 20 (Sweden), June 25 (Estonia), August 21 (Latvia), September 1 (Czech Republic) and September 2 (Slovakia).

Notable bearers include: American actress and star of the Exorcist, Linda Blair (b.1959); Wonder Woman star, Lynda Carter (b. 1951); Canadian supermodel, Linda Evangelista (b.1965); actress Linda Fiorentino (b.1958) and Linda McCartney (1941-1998).

Sources

  1. www.behindthename.com
  2. www.askoxford.com
  3. http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/19438
  4. http://www.kalevipoeg.info/
  5. http://www.lituanus.org/2001/01_3_05.htm
  6. http://www.nlib.ee/html/expo/kalevipoeg/sisse-eng.html
  7. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linda_(Estonian_mythology)
  8. http://online.ectaco.co.uk/main.jsp;jsessionid=bc30356aa6876d371b29?do=e-services-dictionaries-word_translate1&direction=2&status=translate&lang1=23&lang2=et&refid=-1&source=lind

Colombe

Gender: Feminine
Origin: French
Meaning: “dove.”
Pronunciation

The name comes directly from the French word for dove and despite it being a modern word, it is an ancient French female name.

It was borne by a 3rd-century Christian martyr and saint who had been killed in Sens.

Traditionally, the name was always more common in Corsica, but has recently risen in popularity in other parts of France. As of 2009, she was the 495th most popular female name in France.

Sainte-Colombe is a term in French used to describe the Holy Spirit.

An obscure masculine form is Colomb.

Pakhom, Pacôme

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Ancient Egyptian
Meaning: “he-falcon.”
Fre (PAH-kome)

The name is composed of the ancient Egyptian elements, pa (he) and akhom (falcon).

The name was later hellenized to Pachomius and franconized to Pacôme.

The name is borne by a major Coptic Christian saint (circ.3rd-century C.E), who is also revered in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches. Pakhom is credited for being the founder of Coptic Monasticism.

As of 2009, its French form of Pacôme was the 412th most popular male name in France.

Other forms of the name include:

  • Bakhoum باخوم (Arabic/Assyrian/Lebanese/Syrian)
  • Pacomi (Catalan)
  • Pacumi (Catalan)
  • Pakhom (Coptic)
  • Pacôme (French)
  • Pachôme (French)
  • Pakhomios Παχώμιος (Greek)
  • Pacomio (Italian/Spanish)
  • Pachomiusz (Polish)
  • Pacômio (Portuguese-Brazilian)
  • Pacómio (Portuguese-European)
  • Pahomie (Romanian)
  • Pahomij Пахомий (Russian/Slovene)
  • Pahomije (Serbian)
  • Paho (Slovene)
  • Paxomij Пахомій (Ukrainian)
The name was also borne by a 15th-century Serbian hagiographer and two patriarchs of Constantinople.
Pachomius is also the name of a genus of spider.

Phoebe

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Greek
Meaning: bright; light
(FEE-bee).

To many Americans, Phoebe brings to mind the wacky yet lovable character of Phoebe Buffay on the popular SitCom, Friends. To the British, she is of an upper crust trendy sort, to Christians, she is an admirable woman in the New Testament, and to the Greeks, she is a classic, featured in both the Greek Orthodox calendar of saints as well as in Greek myth.

The name is derived from the Greek, Phoibus, which means “bright, light.”

In Greek Mythology, Phoebe was a pre-Olympic goddess, a Titan. She was the goddess of the moon and the consort of her own brother Coeus, from him, she mothered Asteria and Leto and was believed to be the grandmother of Artemis and Apollo.

The Greeks later associated her with the goddess Artemis. Phoebe was often used as an epithet for Artemis, while the masculine form, Phoebus, was used for Apollo.

Phoebe was also associated with the Oracle of Delphi.

There are a few other Phoebes mentioned in ancient Greek religion, one was a Heliade nymph, another was the daughter of Leucippus and Philodice.

Phoebe, daughter of Leucippus, and her sister Hilaeira, were priestesses to Artemis and Athena. They were both betrothed to Idras and Lynceus. Castor and Pollux, the divine twins, were so impressed by their beauty, that they fell in love with the two maidens and carried them off for themselves. Idras and Lynceus, outraged, sought the two immortals but were both slain. Nevertheless, Phoebe married Pollux. It was also the name of a sister to Leda.

In the New Testament, the name is borne by a woman of Cenchrae, many scholars argue that she was a deaconess, the Catholic Church especially seems to support this stance. She is also believed to have brought Paul’s Epistle of the Romans to Rome. She is a canonized saint in both the Catholic and Greek Orthodox Churches, both rites hold her feast on September 3rd.

Fast forward to the 1500s and you will find the name Phebe, (an older English spelling), as the name of one of Shakespeare’s characters in his play, As You Like It. In the modern American Classic, she is the younger sister of Holden Caulfied in J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye. Polish Science Fiction writer, Jacek Duraj, uses the name as an acronym for post-human beings in his novel Perfekcyjna niedoskonałość.

Phoebe is also the name of a genus of evergreen tree, a species of bird and a moon of the planet, Saturn.

As of 2010, Phoebe was the 29th most popular female name in England/Wales. Her rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 56 (Australia, NSW, 2010)
  • # 90 (Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 93 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 309 (United States, 2010)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Febe (Asturian/Danish/German/Italian/Norwegian/Polish/Portuguese/Spanish/Swedish)
  • Foibe (Danish)
  • Phoebe (Dutch/English/German)
  • Phœbé/Phébé (French)
  • Phoibe (German)
  • Phoebi/Phoibi (Greek)
  • Feba (Serbo-Croatian)
  • Foibe (Swedish)