Angelica


Gender: Feminine
Origin: Latin
Meaning: “angelic.”
Eng (AN-jel-ik-ah), It/Pol (ahn-JAY-lee-kah); Germ (ahn-GAY-lee-kah); Sp (ahn-HAY-lee-lah) Swe/Nor (ahn-YAY-lee-kah); Fre (Pronunciation)

The name is derived from the Latin angelicus meaning “angelic” and is ultimately derived from the Greek, άγγελος (ángelos) meaning, “messenger.” The name was used by the 16th-century, Italian poets, Boiardo and Aristo for their Orlando poems, in which it is the name of Orlando’s love interest.

In England, Angelica has been used as a given name since the 18th-century.

Angelica is also the name of a type of herb.

As of 2010, Angelica stood as the 345th most popular female name in the United States, while the French form of Angélique came in as the 439th most popular female name in France, (2009) and the 627th most popular in the United States, (2010).

As of 2009, its Spanish form of Angélica was the 88th most popular female name in Mexico.

The name is borne by several saints, and was also borne by 18th-century Swiss painter, Angelica Kauffman (1741-1807). Other notable Angelicas include:

Italian opera singer, Angelica Catalani (1780-1849), Stand-in American First Lady, Angelica Van Buren (1818-1877), American nun and TV host, Mother Angelica (b.1923); Angelica Pickles, a popular cartoon character featured on the Rugrats; American actress, Anjelica Huston; Norwegian princess, Maud Angelica Behn (b.2003) .

The Latinate, Angelica form, is used in English speaking countries, Italy, Romania, Norway, Sweden and occasionally Poland. Other forms of the name include:

  • Angèlica (Catalan)
  • Angelika (Czech/Danish/German/Hungarian/Icelandic/Norwegian/Slovak/Swedish)
  • Angélique (French)
  • Anxélica (Galician)
  • Angeliki/Aggeliki Αγγελική (Greek: Modern)
  • Angyalka (Hungarian)
  • Angelíka (Icelandic)
  • Anjelica (Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Angelica/Angelika/Andżelika (Polish)
  • Anželika (Russian)
  • Angelìca (Sardinian)
  • Angelika Ангелика (Serbian)
  • Angélica (Spanish/Portuguese)

There is an Italian masculine form, which is Angelico, and the Late Latin masculine form, Angelicus.

4 thoughts on “Angelica

  1. The Norwegian princess Maud Angelica made this name come into popular use in Norway (not top 100 yet, though). Unfortunately, that also lead to the more phonetic spelling of Anjelica which is butchery if you ask me, but perhaps you could include it as a Norwegian version?

    Maud however is far from coming back into use… I prefer Maud to Angelica personally, and suspect I’ll use Maud one way or another🙂

  2. The Portuguese pronunciation is something like [uhñ-ZHEL-ee-kuh], while French Angélique is [uhñ-zheh-LEE-ke] (final e is mute).

    In both cases the first syllable has a nasal sound, similar to the first one in ‘encore’. I’m not sure on how to represent it in writing.

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