Lubin


Gender: Masculine
Origin: French
Meaning: “wolf-like.”
(Pronunciation)

The name is possibly derived from the Latin, Lupinus, meaning, “wolf-like.” The name was borne by a 6th-century French saint and bishop of Chartres.

It also appears in Jean-François Marmontel’s 1761 morality tale, Annette & Lubin. The story recounts the illicit affair between two orphaned cousins who subsequently bear children together and become the spectacle of their town in Belgium. The story is supposedly based on true events which occurred in Spa. The two characters have become folk heros in modern Spa and there is a local hill named for them.

Lubin is a term which also appears in French folk-lore as the name of a type of elf who appears on the road to Normandy on Christmas, screaming, “Robert the devil is dead!”. Lubin is also used to describe a type of werewolf which hangs out in graveyards and feeds off the bones of the dead. Despite these rather unsavory connotations, the name still appears in the French top 500. As of 2009, he was the 326th most popular male name.

It is also the name of a city in Poland, though this has a different etymology.

 

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