Daisy


Gender: Feminine
Origin: English
Meaning: “day’s eye, name of the flower.”
(DAY-zee)

The name has been used as a diminutive form of Margaret in England since the Middle Ages, but did not catch on as an independent given name till the Victorian Era, when other floral names came into fashion.

Its usage as a diminutive form of Margaret has to do with the fact that in French the word for daisy is marguerite. Margherita and Margarita is the word for daisy in their own respective languages.

In the Colonial period, when the name Candace was often pronounced as (kan-DAY-see) vs (CAN-das), Daisy was sometimes used as a diminutive form.

The etymology of Daisy itself is from the Anglo-Saxon, dægeseage, meaning, “day’s eye.”

Since the 19th-century, its usage has been borrowed by non English-speaking countries, such as Sweden, the Netherlands, Germany and some of the Latin American countries.

As of 2010, Daisy was the 15th most popular female name in England/Wales. Her rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 44 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 59 (Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 71 (Ireland, 2010)
  • # 85 (New Zealand, 2010)
  • # 151 (United States, 2010)
  • # 250 (Netherlands, 2010)

The name is borne by the Disney Character and girlfriend of Donald Duck, Daisy Duck. Daisy Duke of The Dukes of Hazard and by Cuban-American model, Daisy Fuentes (b.1966).

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5 thoughts on “Daisy

  1. Most cognat forms of Margaret would work as equivalents for this name. Margarita, Marguerite, Margarida, Margherita, Margriet, all refer to the daisy flower in their respective languages.

    In flower language, Daisies are associated with “purity, innocence, loyal love, beauty, patience and simplicity”. In WWII, they were used as a symbol for the Dutch resistance against the Nazis.

  2. Most cognat forms of Margaret would work as equivalents for this name. Margarita, Marguerite, Margarida, Margherita, Margriet, all refer to the daisy flower in their respective languages.

    In flower language, Daisies are associated with “purity, innocence, loyal love, beauty, patience and simplicity”. In WWII, they were used as a symbol for the Dutch resistance against the Nazis.
    Btw, really good post. Can’t wait on the next one!

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