Julian


Gender: Masculine
Origin: Latin

The name is an anglicized form of the French male name, Julien, which is derived from the Latin Julianus (See Julius).

In history, the name was borne by the last non-Christian Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th-century CE). It was also borne by a very popular French saint, Julien the Hospitaller.

In Medieval Englian, Julian was a female name and the traditional masculine cognate was Jolyon. Both names went out of usage by the Renaissance and neither were revived until the 19th-century.

Currently, Julian is the 12th most popular male name in Austria, (2010). His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 15 (Germany, 2011)
  • # 17 (the Netherlands, 2010)
  • # 32 (Norway, 2010)
  • # 53 (United States, 2010)
  • # 59 (France, Julien, 2009)
  • # 66 (Belgium, Julien, 2009)
  • # 98 (Sweden, 2010)
  • # 147 (France, Julian, 2009)
  • # 561 (United States, Julien, 2010)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Juljan (Albanian)
  • Julen (Basque)
  • Juluan (Breton)
  • Yulian Юлиан (Bulgarian/Russian/Ukrainian)
  • Julià (Catalan)
  • Julijan (Croatian/Macedonian/Serbian/Slovene)
  • Julian (Dutch/English/German/Occitanian/Polish/Scandinavian)
  • Jolyon (English)
  • Julien (French)
  • Xulián (Galician)
  • Ioulianos Ιουλιανός (Greek)
  • Giuliano (Italian)
  • Iulianus (Latin)
  • Julijonas (Lithuanian)
  • Juliano (Portuguese/Spanish)
  • Julião (Portuguese)
  • Iulian (Romanian)
  • Julián (Spanish)
  • Turiano (Tahitian)

For feminine forms (see Juliana)

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