Snae Names

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Icelandic/Faroese
Meaning: “snow.”

There are several Icelandic feminine names that carry the snae- element which is derived from the Icelandic word for snow. These are the following:

Snæbjörg

The name is composed of the elements, snae meaning “snow” and björg meaning either “rock” or “help; aid.”

As of 2007, 11 women in Iceland bore this as a first name and 8 had it as a middle name.

The Faroese version is Snæbjørg.

Snæbjört

Composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and björt meaning “bright; clear; shining.”

As of 2007, only five women bore this as a first name and five women had it as a middle name.

Snæborg

Composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and borg meaning either “town; city” or “castle” or “shelter” or “rocky hill.”

As of 2007, only 3 women in Iceland had this as a first name and one had it as a middle name.

Snæbrá

Composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and brá meaning “brow; eyebrow” or “eyelash.”

As of 2007, only one person bore this as a first name and one had it as a middle name.

Snædís

Composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and dís meaning “goddess; fairy; nymph.”

As of 2007, 169 women bore this as a first name, while 34 had it as a middle name.

Snæfríður

The name is composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and fríður meaning “pretty.”

The Faroese form is Snæfríð.

As of 2007, 63 women in Iceland bore this as first name and 9 had it as a middle name.

Snælaug

The name is composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and laug meaning “hot spring; bath.”

Its Faroese form is Snæleyg.

As of 2007, nobody in Iceland had this as a first name or as a middle name.

Snærós

The name is composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and rós meaning “rose.”

As of 2007, 5 women bore this as a first name and 2 had it as a middle name.

Snærún

The name is composed of the elements snae meaning “snow” and rún meaning “rune.”

As of 2007, 4 women had this as a first name and one had it as a middle name.

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Jökulrós

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Icelandic
Meaning: “glacier rose; ice rose.”

The name is composed of the Icelandic elements jökul meaning “ice cap; glacier” and rós meaning “rose.” The name is not very common in Iceland, as of 2007, only one person bore this as first name and only six had it has a middle name.

Fönn

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Icelandic
Meaning: “snow; snowdrift.”

The name is derived from the Icelandic words, fannar and fannir, meaning “snow” or “snowdrift.”

As of 2007, only 4 women in Iceland bore this as a first name, and 42 had it as a middle name.

Drífa

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Icelandic
Meaning: “heavy snow fall; snow drift.”

The name comes directly from the Icelandic word describing a heavy snow fall or snow drift.

As of 2007, there were approximately 155 women in Iceland who bore this as a first name, and 49 who had it as a middle name.

David

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Hebrew
Meaning: “beloved.”

The name is derived from the Hebrew דָּוִד (Dawid), which is derived from the Hebrew word דוד (dwd) meaning “beloved.”

The name is borne in the Old Testament by King David, he is considered to be the greatest Jewish king in history, he is famous for defeating the evil Philistine, Goliath and several other endeavors mentioned in the Bible. He also plays a part in the Qu’ran and in Christian tradition, is considered an ancestor of Jesus.

In the English speaking world, the name has been in usage since the Middle Ages, it was borne by two Scottish Kings and St. Dewi (known as St. David in English) is considered the patron saint of Wales.

In the United States, the name currently ranks in as the 14th most popular male name, actually, David has been in the U.S. top 20 since 1880, and he peaked in 1960, coming in at # 1. In other countries, his popularity is as follows:

  • # 2 Davit (Armenia, 2008)
  • # 74 (Australia, 2007)
  • # 6 (Austria, 2008)
  • # 7 (Catalonia, Spain, 2008)
  • # 87 (Belgium, 2006)
  • # 53 (Canada, B.C. 2008)
  • # 31 (Chile, 2006)
  • # 64 (England/Wales, 2008)
  • # 1 (Faroe Islands, 2008)
  • # 96 (France, 2006)
  • # 6 (Hungary, 2008)
  • # 16 (Ireland, 2007)
  • # 4 (Israel, among Jewish boys, 2008)
  • #  9 Davide (Italy, 2007)
  • # 1 (Liechtenstein)
  • # 4 Dovydas (Lithuanian)
  • # 41 (the Netherlands, 2008)
  • # 51 (Norway, 2007)
  • # 8 Dawid (Poland, 2008)
  • # 4 (Romania, 2008)
  • # 27 (Scotland, 2008)
  • # 9 (Slovenia, 2005)
  • # 4 (Spain, 2008)
  • # 40 (Sweden 2007)
  • # 4 (Switzerland, among German-speakers, 2008)
  • # 6 (Switzerland, among French-speakers, 2008)
  • # 5 Davide (Switzerland, among Italian-speakers, 2008)

The David form is used in Albanian, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, French, Galician, German, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish and Swedish.

Other forms of the name are:

  • Davidi (Albanian)
  • Da’ud/Da’oud/Da’wud/Da’wood داؤود (Arabic)
  • Davit Դավիթ (Armenian)
  • Davud (Azeri)
  • Davud/Daud/Daut (Bosnian)
  • Daveth (Cornish)
  • Taavet/Taave/Taavi/Taavo/Tavo (Estonian)
  • Daavid (Finnish)
  • Taavetti/Taavi (Finnish)
  • Dáibhead/Dáibheid/Daithí/Davy (Gaelic/Irish)
  • Dawit/Dato დავით (Georgian)
  • David Δαβίδ (Greek)
  • Dávid (Hungarian/Faroese/Slovak)
  • Davíð (Icelandic)
  • Daud (Indonesian)
  • Davide (Italian: Davidino and Daviduccio are obscure diminutive forms that were occasionally used as independent given names)
  • Daudi (Kiswahili)
  • Dawid (Kurdish)
  • Dāvids/Dāvis (Latvian)
  • Dovydas (Lithuanian)
  • Davidu Давідъ(Old Church Slavonic)
  • Davud داوود (Persian)
  • Dawid (Polish: DAH-veed)
  • David Давид (Russian/Belarusian)
  • Davíd (Spanish)
  • Dàibheid/Dàibhidh/Daividh (Scottish)
  • Davud/Dâvud (Turkish)
  • Davyd (Ukrainian)
  • Dai (Welsh: a Welsh diminutive form of David, occasionally used as an independent given name)
  • Dafydd/Dewi (Welsh)
  • Dewydd (Welsh: archaic)
  • Dovid (Yiddish)
  • Dudel (Yiddish)
  • Tavel (Yiddish)

Feminine forms are:

  • Davida (English/Scottish)
  • Davina/Davinia (English/Scottish)

Designated name-days are December 29 and December 30.

Richlinde

Gender: Feminine
Origin: German
Meaning: “ruler; soft, gentle: hence possibly meaning “gentle ruler.”

The name is composed of the Germanic elements, rich meaning, “ruler” and lind meaning “soft; tender; gentle.”

The name is considered hopelessly old fashioned in German speaking countries, but it may be appealing to the Anglo-phone parent looking for a name that has a” trendy-surname” appeal, especially if its pronounced the English way, (RICH-lind). In German, it is pronounced (ricH-lin-de), the CH is more of a gutteral H sound and the final E is pronounced.

Other forms are Richlind and Richlindis.

In Germany, its designated name-day is December 26.

Kantvilas, Kantvilė

Origin: Lithuanian
Meaning: “patient hope.”
(kahnt-VIHL-as; kahnt-VIL-ay)

The names are composed of the Lithuanian elements -kant (kantus, kantrus) meaning “patient” and vil-(viltis) meaning “hope.” Kantvilas is masculine and Kantvilė feminine. Their designated name-day is December 28.