Lillemor

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Norwegian/Swedish
Meaning: “little mother.”
(LIL-leh-MORE)

With the recent surge of popularity in Lily names, I thought this unusual gem might be worth posting, though considered an “old lady” name in Scandinavia, it might make a fresh and interesting option for an Anglophone parent.

Lillemor is relatively recent in history, she first appeared in Norway as a nickname and was first recorded as a full-fledged given name in Sweden in 1901. The name comes from the Norwegian and Swedish words lille meaning “little; small” and mor meaning “mother.” Ask most Swedes or Norwegians how they feel about this name and they will likely frown, she is somewhat the equivalent of a Mildred to an American. She was quite fashionable during the 1930s and 40s, and is hence, usually considered a name of its time. She has, however, spawned off a fashionable nickname name: Moa, which is currently very trendy in Sweden as an independent given name.

Her name-day is November 18. As of December 31, 2008, there were approximately 11, 198 women who bore the name Lillemor in Sweden.

Nicknames are Lily and Moa.

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Sverker

Sverker I of Sweden

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Old Norse
Meaning: “black spear.”

The name is a modern form of the Old Norse Svartgeirr, which is composed of the elements svart meaning “black; dark” and geirr meaning “spear.” The name appears on a rune stone which dates back to the last millenium, in Fröberg, Södermanland, Sweden, which translates as follows: “Vighjälm and Ödmund erected this stone in honour of their dear brother, Sverker.”

As of December 31, 2008, there were approximately 1,872 registered persons in Sweden with the name Sverker. Its designated name-day is November 4.

The name was borne by two Swedish kings, Sverker I (1130-1156) and Sverker II, (1196-1208).

Another form is Sverkir.

Elisabeth, Elizabeth

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Hebrew
Meaning: “God is my oath; God is abundance.”

The name is a transliterated form of the Biblical Greek Ελισβετ (Elisabet), which is a Hellenized version of the Biblical Hebrew feminine name, אֱלִישֶׁבַע‎ (Elisheva).

Elizabeth appears twice in the Bible, once in the Old Testament as the name of Aaron’s wife and once in the New Testament as the wife of Zachariah and the mother of John the Baptist.

Elizabeth has remained fairly consistent in the U.S top 100 for over a hundred years. She currently ranks in at # 9 and the lowest she has ever come in the U.S. charts was in 1945 at # 26.

In Australia she is the 37th most popular female name (2007), in Canada, she ranks in at # 20 (2008), in England/Wales she came in at # 40 (2008), in Ireland at # 63 (2007) and in Scotland at # 68 (2008).

The name was borne by several saints and European royalty. Among the most notable bearers were, St. Elizabeth of Hungary, a 12th-century Hungarian princess who was known for her acts of kindness and charity toward the poor and Queen Elizabeth I of England, including the current reigning Queen, Elizabeth II.

The name Isabel/Isabella are relatives, but have becomes so far apart from its original source, that they often occur concurrently in many European countries with Elizabeth, hence is why I shall devote a different post to Isabel/Isabella, but I shall cite her several times in this article as a variation whenever needed.

I believe one of the reasons why Elizabeth has been a long time favorite, is because of her versatility. She can be shortened to a variety of different nicknames, especially in English. The most popular are: (I have cited the ones that have commonly been used as independent given name with a black club)

Bess, Bessie, Beth♣, Bets, Betsy, Bet, Bettie/Betty, Bezzy, Bit, Bitsy, Biz, Buffy, Elisa♣, Elise♣, Elle♣, Eliza♣, Ella♣, Ellie, Elsa♣, Elsie♣, Ibbie, Lib, Libby, Lilly, Lisa♣, Liz, Lizzie, Liza♣, Tetty, Tibby and Tizzy.

Other forms of the name include:

Latinate Forms
Forms found in Latinate/Romance languages

  • Sabela (Asturian)
  • Elisabèt, Lisabèt (Bearnais)
  • Elisabet (Catalan)
  • Babette (French: originally a diminutive form, used as independent given name, now considered extremely dated)
  • Élisabeth (French)
  • Élise (French)
  • Lise (French)
  • Lisette (French: originally a diminutive form but exclusively used as an independent given name)
  • Bettina (Italian)
  • Elisa (Italian/French/Portuguese: appears in Boccaccio’s Decameron as the name of one of the female story tellers).
  • Elisabella (Italian: obscure)
  • Elisabetta (Italian/Romansch)
  • Elisa (Italian/Sardinian/Spanish)
  • Elisanna/Elisena (Italian: obscure)
  • Elisetta (Italian)
  • Lelisa (Italian: obscure)
  • Lisa (Italian/Spanish)
  • Lisella (Italian: obscure)
  • Lisena (Italian: obscure)
  • Lisetta (Italian)
  • Lisina/Lisinda (Italian: obscure)
  • Lisanna (Italian)
  • Elisabetha (Late Latin)
  • Elizabetta (Liguru: a minor language spoken in Italy)
  • Elisabeta/Elisèu/Eliso (Occitanian)
  • Elisabete/Elisete/Elsa (Portuguese)
  • Babèu/Eisabèu/ Lisabèu (Provencal: Babeu is a diminutive)
  • Elisabeta (Romanian/Spanish)
  • Lisabetta (Romansch/Corsican)
  • Lisabbetta (Sicilian)
  • Isabel/Ysabel (Spanish/Aragonese/Catalan/Galician/Portuguese)

Germanic Forms
Forms used in Germanic languages

  • Elsabe (Afrikaans)
  • Liesel (Alsatian)
  • Elisabet (Danish/Faroese/Swedish/Norwegian)
  • Elsebeth (Danish)
  • Else (Danish)
  • Lise (Danish/German)
  • Lis (Danish/Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Lisbet (Danish/Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Lisbeth (Danish/German)
  • Els (Dutch: a diminutive form, occasionally used as an independent give name)
  • Elsa (Dutch/German/Swedish)
  • Liesbeth/Lijsbeth (Dutch)
  • Liesje (Dutch)
  • Eliza (English: originally a diminutive, exclusively used as an independent given name)
  • Elsba/Elsbet/Elsuba/Elusbet (Faroese)
  • Elspa (Faroese)
  • Lisabet/Lisbet (Faroese)
  • Elsebe/Elsche/Eske/Telsa (Frisian)
  • Bettina/Bettine (German: a borrowing from the Italian)
  • Elisa (German: a borrowing from Romance languages)
  • Elisabeth (German/Dutch)
  • Elise (German/Danish/Dutch/English/Norwegian: a borrowing from the French)
  • Elli (German: diminutive form, occasionally used as an independent given name)
  • Elsbeth (German/Swiss-German dialectical form)
  • Ilsa/Ilse (German/Dutch: initially a diminutive form, popularly bestowed as an independent given name, now considered dated. il-SEH)
  • Lies/Liesa/Liese (German/Dutch)
  • Liesel/Liesl (German: originally a diminutive form, used as an independent given name, now considered dated)
  • Lilli (German: originally a diminutive form, used as an independent given name due to its association with the flower)
  • Lisa/Lise (German/Dutch/English/Swedish/Danish/Norwegian)
  • Sabeth (German: obscure)
  • Aileisabaiþ (Gothic)
  • Elísabet (Icelandic)
  • Ellisif/Ellisiv (Norwegian)
  • Lieken, Lüke, Lücken (Plattdeutsch)
  • Bettan (Swedish: originally a diminutive form, occasionally used as an independent given name, but now considered dated)
  • Lisen (Swedish: originally a diminutive form, used as an independent given name)

German diminutive forms are Betti, Elis, Elli, Elschen, and Lieschen.

Slavic Forms
Forms used in Slavic speaking countries

  • Elisaveta Елисавета (Bulgarian)
  • Elizabeta (Croatian)
  • Alžběta (Czech: alzh-BYEH-tah)
  • Eliška (Czech: originally a diminutive form, used as an independent given. eh-LEESH-kah)
  • Elisabeti Елїсабеть (Old Church Slavonic)
  • Eliza (Polish: eh-LEE-zah)
  • Elżbieta (Polish: elsh-BYEH-tah)
  • Halszka (Polish: archaic. HAHLSH-kah)
  • Halżbieta (Polish: archaic. halsh-BYEH-tah)
  • Elizaveta/Yelizaveta Елизавета (Russian)
  • Jelisaveta (Serbian)
  • Alžbeta (Slovak)
  • Ažbeta (Slovene)
  • Betina (Slovene)
  • Elica (Slovene: originally a diminutive form, used as an independent given name. eh-LEET-sah)
  • Elisa/Elis (Slovene)
  • Elizabeta/Elizabet (Slovene)
  • Elza (Slovene)
  • Jelisava (Slovene)
  • Lizabeta (Slovene)
  • Špela (Slovene: originally a diminutive form, exclusively used as an independent given name. SHPEH-lah)
  • Hilža (Sorbian)
  • Lisaveta/Yelysaveta (Ukrainian)

Czech diminutive forms are Běta, Bětka, Bětuška, Betynka, Bětuše, Betyna, and Líza. Slovakian diminutives include: Beta, Betka, Betuška, Betinka, Betuša and Betina. Polish diminutive forms are Bieta, Ela (the most prevalent), Elka, Elunia and Elżunia. Slovene diminutives are: Beta, Beti, Betika, Ela, Eli, Elzi, Špelca, Špelica, Špelka, Jelica, Lili, and Lizika.

Baltic Forms
Forms used in the Baltic States

  • Eliisabet (Estonian)
  • Elts (Estonian)
  • Etti (Estonian)
  • Ilze (Estonian)
  • Liisa/Liisi/Liis (Estonian/Finnish)
  • Liisu (Estonian)
  • Eliisa (Finnish)
  • Elizabete (Latvian)
  • Līze/Lizina (Latvian)
  • Elžbieta (Lithuanian)
  • Eliissá/Liisá/Liissá (Saami)

Celtic Forms
Forms used in Celtic based languages

  • Elesbed (Breton)
  • Eilís (Irish: IE-leesh)
  • Ealisaid (Manx: ALE-is-sed)
  • Ealee (Manx)
  • Ealish (Manx)
  • Ealasaid (Scottish)
  • Elspeth (Scottish)
  • Bethan/Betsan (Welsh)

Other forms

  • Elizabeta (Albanian)
  • Ilizabith إليزابيث (Arabic)
  • Il-Shvai ܐܠܝܫܒܥ \ܐܠܝܫܒܚ (Aramaic)
  • Elsapet (Armenian)
  • Yeghisapet (Armenian)
  • Zabel (Armenian)
  • Elixabete/Elixabet/Elizabete (Basque: former are pronounced eh-LEE-sheh-BEH-tah and eh-LEE-shah-Bet)
  • Elixi (Basque: eh-LEE-shee)
  • Elisheba (Biblical Hebrew)
  • Eliso ელისო (Georgian)
  • Lizi (Georgian)
  • Elisavet Ελισαβετ(Greek: Modern)
  • Zeta (Greek: Modern)
  • Ilsipat (Greenlandic)
  • Elikapeka (Hawaiian)
  • Elisheva (Hebrew: see Hebrew script above)
  • Lizzamma (Hindi/Indian)
  • Erzsébet/Orzebet (Hungarian: ER-zhey-bet)
  • Aley/Aleyamma/Aleykutty (Malayalam)
  • Eli/Eliamma (Malayalam)
  • Elizabetta (Maltese)
  • Erihapeti (Maori)
  • Elizabet (Turkish)

Hungarian nicknames includes Bözsi, Erzsi (ER-zhee), and Zsóka (ZHO-kaw).

Medieval Forms
Forms no longer in usage from Medieval Europe

  • Ysabel/Ysabet (Catalan, Valencia, 16th-century)
  • Elisaued (Cornwall, England, 10th-century)
  • Elizabez (England, 13th-century)
  • Lylie/Lilion (England, 13th-century, possibly nicknames)
  • Elisota (England, 14th-century)
  • Elseby (Finland)
  • Isabelot (France, Paris, 13th-century)
  • Yzabé (France, Bordeaux, 15th-century)
  • Besina (14th-century Italy, Venice, possibly a diminutive form)
  • Isabetta (Italy, Florence 15th-century)
  • Bechte (Germany, 15th-century, most likely a diminutive form)
  • Beth (Germany, 15th-century, diminutive form)
  • Bettlin (Germany, 15th-century, probably a diminutive form)
  • Bytzel (Germany, 15th-century, diminutive form)
  • Els (Germany, 15th-century, diminutive form)
  • Elsslein (Germany, late 15th-century)
  • Elsslin (Germany, 15th-century, probably a diminutive form)
  • Eltzabet (Germany, late 15th-century)
  • Lyse (Germany, 15th-century, diminutive form)
  • Elsebeth (Germany, 15th-century)
  • Elzebeth (German, in Silesia, 14th-century)
  • Nele/Neleke (German, in Silesia, 14th-century, most likely than not, diminutive forms)
  • Elysant (Normandy, 1190)
  • Helisent (Normandy, 1221)
  • Isabellis (Normandy, 12th-century)
  • Ysabels/Yzabels/Yzabela (Occitan, Saint Flour, 14th-century)
  • Elitze (Sweden, 15th-century)
  • Elsika/Elsiko/Elzeke (Sweden, 15th-century)
  • Elsby/Elzeby (Sweden, 16th-century)
  • Aleseta (Switzerland, Sion, 14th-century)

Name-days are: November 17 and November 19.

Catherine/Katherine

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Debated
Meaning: Debated

Katherine and Catherine have to be one of the quintessential female classics of the Western World, according to the United States Social Security Administration’s popularity charts, Katherine has not fallen out of the top 100 for over a 100 years. She has remained a staple, bouncing the lowest to 105th position in 1938 and bouncing the highest to the 25th place in 1991. She currently ranks in as the 45th most popular female name in the United States (2008). Her elder English and French counterpart, Catherine, comes in slightly lower, but has remained fairly high in the American charts since 1880. Her highest position being at # 18 in 1914 and then again in 1917 and came in the lowest just this past year, ranking in at # 149.

In other countries, the rankings of Katherine are as follows:

# 78 (Canada-BC, 2008)
# 63 (Chile, 2006)

Her popularity in other incarnations are as follows: (divided alphabetically by cited country)

Katharina (# 8, Austria, 2008)
Catalina (# 3, Chile, 2006)
Kateřina (# 7, Czech Republic, 2008)
Katrin (# 6, Faroe Islands, 2008)
Aikaterini (# 3, Greece, 2004)
Katrín (# 4, Iceland, 2004-2007)
Katie (# 2, Ireland, 2008)
Kate (# 10, Ireland, 2008)
Karin (9th most popular female name among Palestinian Christians in Israel, 2004)
Katharina (# 5, Liechtenstein, 2008)
Katerina (# 10, Macedonia, 2006)
Katie (# 1, Northern Ireland, 2008)
Yekaterina (# 1, Russia-St. Petersburg, 2003)
Yekaterina (# 6, Russia-Moscow, 2007)
Katie (# 8, Scotland, 2008)
Katarina (# 7, Serbia, 2005)
Katarína (# 4, Slovakia, 2004)
Kaitlyn (# 10, United States-Combined Spellings, 2007)

As for the etymology of the name, it has always been popularly believed to mean “pure” but its history and origins are far more complicated and muddled. There are several theories as to its derivations and linguistic origins, the most popular are that it is either derived from the Greek  word, ΚαΘαροσ, (katharos), meaning, “pure”, or the Greek Εεκατερινε, (Hekaterine), a feminine form of the Greek, Hekáteros, meaning “each of the two; singly.” It has also been suggested that it is a form of the Greek goddess name, Hecate, which means “from a far”, or it is possibly from the Greek word, αικια (aikia) meaning, “torture; injurious treatment.” According to Behindthename, another theory suggests that it could be from a Coptic name meaning “my consecration of your name.”

The name was introduced into Western Europe after European Crusaders encountered the Christians of the Middle East, among them, the devotion of a popular 4th-century, Christian saint was discovered, St. Katherine of Alexandria. According to legend, the saint was spiked and tortured on a wheel after refusing to deny her Christian convictions and converting several members of the Alexandrian royal family to Christianity. Her cult was very popular among Christians in Syria, many centuries before her story even reached Europe. After its introduction, European Latin scholars assumed that the name was associated with the Greek Katharos meaning “pure.”

The name was first recorded in England in 1196. It was thereafter an extremely popular name in Christian Europe.

Catherine has several name-days, but the most popular, and the most widely celebrated during the Middle Ages, took place on November 25th. There is an old French celebration that took place on November 25th.  It was a day for unmarried women, twenty-five years and older, (labelled Catherinette’s in French). They would make caps, attend balls and crown the local St. Catherine of Alexandria statue with a custom hat. This was to ensure that the saint would provide the single ladies a partner by the end of the year. The term “capping st. Catherine” was used in reference to a single woman 25 years and up. This tradition died out somewhat, but remains a popular festivity among hat-makers and dress-makers even till today, particularly in the 2nd arrondisment of Paris. Any women who is single, working in the fashion industry, 25 years old and older, can attend a ball in a specially made hat, and go to the City Hall to present their creations for judging.

Though the term is a bit old fashioned, catherinette is a French word used to refer to a single women who is 25 years and older.

Other notable bearers, place and things include:

Catherine of Aragon

Catherina is the name of a crater on the moon, named for St. Catherine of Alexandria.

The Monastery of St. Catherine’s in Sinai Egypt, which is said to be the oldest Christian monastery and boasts one of the largest collections codices and manuscripts in the world.

St. Katherine Municipality lies in the North Sinai Governorate of Egypt, its city is St. Katherine’s.

Saint Catherine of Siena (1347-1380), a renowned Catholic saint, theologian, Doctor of the Church and tertiary of the Dominican order. She was known for her mystical experiences and her papal counseling.

St. Catherine of Bologna (1413-1463) another Italian saint, she is considered the patron saint of Bologna, artists and against temptations.

Catherine of Aragon (1485-1536) the first wife of Henry VII of England. Actually, Henry went on to marry two other Catherines, Catherine Howard and Catherine Parr.

St. Kateri Tekakwitha (1656-1680) was a Catholic Algonquin woman affectionately termed Lily of the Mohawks, she was also the daughter of a chief. At a young age she was ravished by the scars of small-pox and lived a life of devotion till she died at the age of 24.

Now to delve into her sundry variations.

Latinate Forms

Variations from various Romance based languages

  • Catèlena (Artapan)
  • Catin/Catineta/Catinon (Bearnais)
  • Caterina (Catalan/Italian/Spanish)
  • Catalina (Corsican/Gascon/Occitanian/Spanish)
  • Catherine (French)
  • Katia (Italian: a borrowing from the Russian but very popular in Italy)
  • Rina (Italian diminutive form, used as an independent given name)
  • Catharina (Late Latin)
  • Catarina (Portuguese/Occitanian/Galician/Romansch)
  • Cátia (Portuguese: originally a diminutive form or either a Portugeusized form of the Slavic Katya, particularly common in Brazil, where it was most likely introduced by Russian and Ukrainian immigrants)
  • Catarino (Provencal)
  • Ninoun (Provencal: originally a diminutive, now becoming more common as an independent given name)
  • Cătălina/Ecaterina (Romanian)
  • Catinca (Romanian: a romanianized form of the Russian diminutive, Katinka, used as an independent given name)
  • Catina (Romanian/Sicilian)
  • Catrina (Romanian)
  • Catrina/Chatrina (Romansch)
  • Caderina/Catellina (Sardinian)

Obscure French diminiutives are Catherinette, Trinette and Rinette.

Germanic Forms
Variation from various Germanic based languages

  • Caja (Danish)
  • Catharina/Cathrine/Katarina/Katherina (Danish/Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Karen (Danish)
  • Karin (Danish/Norwegian/Swedish)
  • Katharine (Danish)
  • Katrina/Katrine/Kathrina/Kathrin (Danish)
  • Trine (Danish)
  • Catharina (Dutch/Swedish)
  • Cato (Dutch)
  • Kaatje (Dutch)
  • Katelijne/Katelijn (Dutch)
  • Katrien (Dutch)
  • Katrijn (Dutch)
  • Nienke (Dutch)
  • Tineke (Dutch: originally a diminutive form, used as an independent given name)
  • Toos/Truus (Dutch: initially diminutive forms, used as independent given names)
  • Trijn/Trijntje (Dutch)
  • Kate/Katie (English: originally diminutive forms, now often used as independent given names in most English speaking countries)
  • Katherine/Karen (English)
  • Katarina/Katrin (Faroese/Danish)
  • Katrina (Faroese)
  • Kaja (Frisian)
  • Käthe/Caatje (Frisian)
  • Katryntje (Frisian)
  • Keetje (Frisian)
  • Nine/Nynke (Frisian)
  • Cathrin/Catrin/Kathrin (German)
  • Carin/Karin/Karina/Karine (German/Swedish/Norwegian/Danish)
  • Katarina/Katerine/Katharina (German)
  • Kathrein (German)
  • Katinka (German/Dutch: Germanized form of the Russian diminutive, Katenka)
  • Katja (German)
  • Trina (German)
  • Kaðlín (Icelandic: kahth-LEEN)
  • Karín (Icelandic)
  • Kata/Katarína/Katrín (Icelandic)
  • Kett (Lëtzebuergesch)
  • Kaia (Norwegian)
  • Kari (Norwegian)
  • Trina (Plauttdeutsch)
  • Cajsa/Kajsa (Swedish)
  • Katarina (Swedish)
  • Reina (Yiddish)

Obscure German diminutive forms are Käthchen and Trinchen. A Swiss German dialectical diminutive is Käti. English diminutive forms are Cat, Cathy, Kate, Kathy, Katie, Kay, Kiki, (also used in Sweden and Norway), Kit and Kitty.

Celtic Forms
Variations from various Celtic based languages

  • Katarin (Breton)
  • Katell/Kattelig (Breton: latter is pronounced kah-tel-LEEK)
  • Katik (Breton: kah-TEEK)
  • Katou (Breton: kah-TOO)
  • Cáit/Cáitín (Irish)
  • Catraoine/Caiterína (Irish)
  • Caitlín (Irish)
  • Caitria/Caitrín (Irish)
  • Caitríona (Irish)
  • Cathleen/Kathleen (Irish: anglicized form of Caitlin)
  • Catreena/Catreeney (Manx)
  • Catrìona (Scottish)
  • Cadi (Welsh)
  • Catrin (Welsh)

Slavic Forms
Variation used in Slavonic based languages

  • Kacjaryna (Belorusian: kahts-yah-REE-nah)
  • Ekaterina (Bulgarian/Macedonian/Russian)
  • Kateřina (Czech: kah-teh-ZHEE-nah)
  • Katarzyna (Polish: kah-tah-ZHIH-nah)
  • Jekaterina/Yekaterina (Russian)
  • Katarina (Serbo-Croatian/Slovenian)
  • Katarína (Slovakian)
  • Katica (Slovenian: originally a diminutive form, now used as an independent given name. kah-TEET-sah)
  • Katja (Slovenian: originally a diminutive form, now used as an independent given name. KAHT-yah)
  • Katherine/Kateryna (Ukrainian)

Russian Diminutives include: Katenka, Katiusha and Katya, Czech pet forms are,Káťa, Kačka, Káča, Kačí, Kačenka, Kača, Kačaba, Kačík, Kačuda, Kaťulka, Katerinka, Katica, Katja, Katka, Katla, Katuška and Rina. The most popular diminutive form in Poland is Kasia (KAH-shuh), but there is also Kachna, Kaśka, Kasienka and Kasiunia. Serbo-Croatian diminiutive forms are Kata, Kate (final E is pronounced), Katica, Katja, Katarincica and Rina. A Bulgarian diminutives is Katriška.Ukrainian diminutives are: Katrusya, Katya and Katerynka. Belorusian diminutive forms are Kasja and Katra.

Baltic Forms
Various forms used in the Baltic States

  • Kaarin (Estonian)
  • Kadi/Kadri/Kadrin (Estonian)
  • Kairi/Kari (Estonian)
  • Kaisa/Kaisu (Estonian/Finnish)
  • Katre/Katri/Katrin (Estonian)
  • Triina/Triin/Triinu (Estonian)
  • Kaija (Finnish)
  • Kata (Finnish)
  • Katariina (Finnish/Estonian)
  • Kati (Finnish)
  • Katja (Finnish)
  • Katri/Katriina (Finnish)
  • Riina (Finnish)
  • Jekaterina (Latvian)
  • Kate (Latvian: final E is pronounced)
  • Katrīna (Latvian)
  • Trine (Latvian: final E is pronounced)
  • Katerina/Katrina (Lithuanian)
  • Katrė (Lithuanian)
  • Katryna (Lithuanian)
  • Kotryna (Lithuanian)

Other Languages

  • Katarina/Katjusha/Katerina/Katha (Albanian)
  • Gadara/Gadarine/Kadara/Kadarine (Armenian)
  • Karine (Armenian)
  • Katalina (Basque)
  • Katalin (Basque/Hungarian)
  • Katarin (Basque)
  • Ekaterina (Georgian)
  • Kattak (Greenlandic)
  • Aikaterine/Aikaterini (Greek Modern)
  • Katerina (Greek Modern)
  • Katina (Greek Modern)
  • Kakalina/Kalena/Kalina (Hawaiian)
  • Kathani (Hindi/Arabic)
  • Katarina (Hungarian/Turkish)
  • Kasari (Japanese)
  • Katarina (Maltese)
  • Kataraina (Maori)
  • Kateri (Mohawk)
  • Gáddjá (Saami)
  • Gáhte (Saami)
  • Gáhteriinná/Káhtariinná (Saami)
  • Gáre/Káre (Saami)
  • Gáren (Saami)
  • Kasrin ܟܐܣܪܝܢ (Syriac/Assyrian)
  • Akaterina (Turkish)

Hungarian diminutive forms include Kata, Kati, Katica, Katinka, Kató, Katóka, Kitti and Koto.


Medieval Forms
Variations used in the Middle Ages and are most likely out of usage
  • Catelinòta (Bearnais)
  • Cathelinen (Dutch, 14th-century)
  • Verkateline (Dutch, 13th-14th centuries)
  • Catelina/Catelin/Catlin (English 12th-century)
  • Cattel/Cattle/Catin (English 12th-century)
  • Katelina/Kateline/Katelin/Katlin (English 12th-century)
  • Caterina/Katerina/Katerine (English 14th-century)
  • Kateryna/Kateryn (English 15th-century)
  • Catant (French, obscure medieval diminutive form)
  • Cateline/Catelot/Caterine (French in Paris, 13th-century, the final T on Catelot is silent).
  • Cathereau (French; obscure medieval form; KAH-teh-RO)
  • Kateline/Katerine (French, in Paris, 13th-century)
  • Ka(e)therlin/Ketlin/Keterlin/Ketterlin (German 15th-century)
  • Keth/Ketherlein (German 15th-century)
  • Katusch/Kethe/Keterlyn (German in Silesia, 13th-century)
  • Kaþareina (Gothic, extinct Germanic language)
  • Quataryna/Quatalina (Provencal, 16th-century)
  • Kaithren (Scottish, 15th-century)
  • Katrein (Scottish, 16th-17th-centuries)
  • Kadrin (Swedish 12th-century)
  • Karinae (Swedish 12th-15th centuries)
  • Katena (Swedish 14th-century)
  • Kättilö (Swedish 14th-century, though may also be a corruption of the Old Norse Katla)

 

There are a few masculine forms, the Italian Caterino, Catterino, Cattalino, Catinu (Sicilian dialectical form), and the Romanian Cătălin.


Berthold, Bertil, Bertille

Origin: French
Meaning: “bright ruler.”
(bare-TEEL); (bare-TEEY)

Bertil is an old French form of Berthold which is of Germanic origins and is composed of the elements beraht meaning “bright” and wald meaning “ruler.” The French feminine form is Bertille and was borne by two early medieval French saints. Bertille’s designated name-day in France is November 6.

Bertil is also used in Scandinavia. Other forms of the name include:

  • Berthoald (Ancient Germanic)
  • Bertaud (French)
  • Bertoldo (Italian)
  • Bertholdus (Late Latin)
  • Bertoldas (Lithuanian)
  • Bertold (Polish/English/Czech)
  • Bertol’d (Russian/Ukrainian)

Other feminine forms:

  • Bertola/Bertolda (Italian)
  • Bertilla (Italian/Romansch)

Tenho

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Finnish
Meaning: “enchantment; glamour; charm; spell.”

The name is possibly of ancient origins, but seems to have gone through a revival during the Finnish National Romantic period at the turn of the 20th-century. The name comes directly from a Finnish word used to describe a type of spell, equivalent to enchantment, charm or glamour, and probably refers to the ancient magical arts of the Saami. Itsdesignated name-day is November 18. The name was borne by Finnish actor, Tenho Saurén (1926-2001) pictured left.

 

Kaija

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Latvian
Meaning: “gull; seagull.”
Lat (KYE-yah).

The name comes directly from the Latvian word for sea-gull, coincidentally, it is also used in Finland as a form of Katherine. As of 2008, there were 97 registered Kaijas in Latvia. Its designated name-day in Latvia is November 12.