Eva, Eve

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Hebrew
Meaning: “life.”
Eng (EEV); (EE-vuh); Germ/Sp/Pol (EV-ah)

The name is borne in the Bible and in the Quran by the first woman created by God. She and her husband were expelled from the Garden of Eden after eating from the Tree of Knowledge.

The name is believed to be derived from the Hebrew roots חַוָּה, Ḥavvāh, from the Hebrew root ḥāyâ meaning “life” and the Semitic element, ḥyw “to live.” Both the Hebrew word chavah meaning “to live” and chayah meaning “to breath” share the same root.

Despite Eve’s fall from Grace in the Bible, the name was always in usage among Jewish, Christian and Muslim communities. In England, its usage can be traced back to the 12th-century. Its Latinate form of Eva, has always been a classic in continental Europe, especially in Germany, Poland, Slovakia and the Czech Republic.

As of 2010, Eva was the most popular female name in the Faroe Islanda and in Slovenia. Eve, Eva and all her various forms’ rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 3 (Iceland, 2010)
  • # 4 (French-speaking, Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 5 (Netherlands, 2010)
  • # 7 (Ieva, Lithuania, 2010)
  • # 10 (Armenia, 2010)
  • # 10 (Evie, England/Wales, 2010)
  • # 14 (Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 15 (France, 2009)
  • # 17 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 20 (Belgium, 2009)
  • # 24 (New Zealand, 2010)
  • # 26 (Australia, NSW, 2010)
  • # 29 (Croatia, 2010)
  • # 31 (Evie, Scotland, 2010)
  • # 33 (Evie, Australia, NSW, 2010)
  • # 37 (England/Wales, 2010)
  • # 44 (Eevi, Finland among Finnish-speakers, 2010)
  • # 44 (Ireland, 2010)
  • # 46 (Austria, 2010)
  • # 47 (Canada, BC, 2010)
  • # 48 (Spain, 2010)
  • # 55 (Catalonia, 2010)
  • # 55 (Éabha, Ireland, 2010)
  • # 56 (Eve, Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 59 (Eve, Ireland, 2010)
  • # 86 (Norway, 2010)
  • # 91 (United States, 2010)
  • # 92 (Eve, England/Wales, 2010)
  • # 99 (Eve, Australia, NSW, 2010)
  • # 201 (Eve, France, 2009)
  • # 589 (Eve, United States, 2010)
  • # 705 (Evie, United States, 2010)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Eva Ева ევა
    (Afrikaans/Albanian/Armenian/Basque/Belarusian/Bosnian/Catalan/Croatian/Czech/Dutch/Faroese/French/Frisian/Galician/Georgian/German/Icelandic/Italian/Portuguese/Romansch/Spanish/Scandinavian)
  • Evis (Albanian)
  • Mahalet/Mahlet (Amharic)
  • Hawa حواء Хауа (Arabic)
  • Yeva (Armenian)
  • Həvva (Azeri)
  • Yeva Ева Эва (Belarusian/Russian/Ukrainian)
  • Yevga Евга (Belarusian)
  • Hava (Bosnian)
  • Evy (Danish/Norwegian/Swedish: initially a diminutive form, occasionally used as an independent given name)
  • Eveke (Dutch: initially a diminutive form, used as an independent given name, EV-eh-ke)
  • Eve (English/Estonian/Walon)
  • Evie (English)
  • Hawat/Hewa (Egyptian/Coptic)
  • Eeva (Estonian/Finnish)
  • Eevi (Estonian/Finnish)
  • Evi (Estonian)
  • Ivi/Iivi (Estonian)
  • Iivika (Estonian)
  • Ève (French)
  • Eefje, Eefke (Frisian)
  • Hawwa ሕይዋን (Ge-ez)
  • Eua Ευα (Greek)
  • Chava חַוָה (Hebrew: Modern: KHAH-vah, gutteral CH sound)
  • Éva (Hungarian: AY-vaw, diminutive form is Évike)
  • Hawa (Indonesian/Malayalam)
  • Éabha (Irish-Gaelic)
  • Ieva (Latvian/Lithuanian: YEH-vah)
  • Evuzus (Malaysian)
  • Aaue (Manx)
  • Èva (Occitanian)
  • Ewa (Polish: EH-vah, diminutive forms are Ewka, Ewunia and Ewusia)
  • Evá (Sami)
  • Evelia (Spanish)
  • Evita (Spanish)
  • Eba (Tagalog)
  • Havva (Turkish)
  • Efa (Welsh)

Italian masculine form is Evo.

Traditionally, in most European countries, the name-day for Adam and Eve is December 24.

Silas

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Greek
Eng (SIE-las); Dan (SEE-lahs)

The name is a Greek form of the Latin male name, Silvanus.

It is borne in the New Testament by a companion of St. Paul, he is revered as a saint in both the Eastern and Roman Churches.

As of 2010, Silas was the 21st most popular male name in Denmark. His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 221 (United States, 2010)
  • # 311 (Netherlands, 2010)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Sila Сіла (Belarusian/Bulgarian/Italian/Russian/Serbian/Ukrainian)
  • Silas (Catalan/Dutch/English/French/German/Portuguese/Scandinavian/Spanish)
  • Sylas (Polish)

Amram

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Biblical Hebrew  עַמְרָם
Meaning: “exalted one.”

The name is found in the Old Testament as the name of the husband of Jochebed and the father of Moses, Aaron and Miriam. In the Qu’ran, the name appears in its Arabic form of Imran عمران as the name of both the father of Moses and the father of the Virgin Mary, (analogous to the Catholic Joachim).

As of 2010, Imran was the 17th most popular male name in Bosnia & Herzegovina. His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 243 (Netherlands, 2010)
  • # 365 (France, 2009)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Imram عمرام (Arabic)
  • Ambram Αμβραμ (Greek)
  • ‘Îmran (Kurdish)
A Bosnian feminine form is Amra, which is currently the 27th most popular female name in Bosnia & Herzegovina, (2010).

Kenan

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Biblical Hebrew קֵינָן
Meaning: “possession.”
Eng (KEE-nen); Bos (KEH-nahn)

The name is found in the Old Testament, in Genesis, as the name of a Biblical Patriarch who lived before the Great Flood and the great grandson of Adam.

The name can also be an anglicized form of the Irish male name, Cianán (KEE-nen), though in this case the name is usually more often anglicized as Keenan.

In the Bosnian case, the name is derived from the Turkish, which is a Turkish form of the Arabic, Kanan, an Arabic form of the Biblical Hebrew male name, Canaan.

The name only seems to have caught on in the 20th-century and as of 2010, Kenan was the 19th most popular male name in Bosnia & Herzegovina. His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 468 (France, 2009)
  • # 474 (Netherlands, 2010)

The name is borne by American actor and comedian, Kenan Thompson (b.1978).

The Biblical form of Kenan is sometimes anglicized to Cainan. Other forms of the name include:

  • Qeynan قينان (Arabic)
  • Quenan (Catalan/Spanish)
  • Kenan قینان (English/German/Persian)
  • Kénan (French)
  • Kainan Καιναν (Greek)

Omar

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Arabic عمر
Meaning: “populous; flourishing; life.”

or

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Biblical Hebrew
Meaning: “speaker.”

The name can be of multiple origins and meanings, in Arabic, the name is derived from the word, عمر (umr) meaning, “life.”

The name was borne by the second caliphe of the Muslims as well as by a 12th-century Persian poet, Umar Khayyam.

In Hebrew, the name means “speaker” and is found Genesis 36:11 as the name of the son of Eliphaz.

The name may also be possibly related to the Hebrew, Omer, which means “sheaf of wheat” but was also the name of a unit of measuring in ancient times.

Omar is a popular name in Spanish-speaking countries, whether this is a leftover from Moorish occupied Spain or in reference to the Biblical Hebrew character is unknown.

As of 2010, Omar was the 54th most popular male name in Bosnia & Herzegovina. His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 4 (Arab world (2011) (BabyCenter Arabia members)
  • # 4 (Pakistan)
  • # 6 (Iraq, 2007)
  • # 7 (Israel, Muslim boys, 2009)
  • # 7 (Umar, Malaysia, 2011)
  • # 8 (United Arab Emirates)
  • # 9 (Omer, Israel, Jewish intersex names (given to both boys and girls) 2008)
  • # 77 (Catalonia, 2010)
  • # 87 (Spain, 2010)
  • # 175 (United States, 2010)
  • # 252 (Netherlands, 2010)
  • # 289 (France, 2009)

Other forms include:

  • Omeri (Albanian)
  • Omer (Amharic/Kurdish)
  • Umar عمر (Arabic)
  • Omar Ома́р (Albanian/Arabic/Bosnian/Chechen/Dagestani/Kazakh/Kyrgyz/Persian/Russian/Spanish/Tajik/Tatar/Turkmen/Uzbek)
  • Ömər (Azeri)
  • Amar (Berber)
  • Úmar (Catalan)
  • Oumar/Oumarou (Sub-Saharan African)
  • Ömer (Turkish)

In France, the designated name-day for Omer is September 9.

Other notable bearers include: Egyptian born actor Omar Sharif (b.1932); Omar al-Bashir (b.1944) the president of Sudan; and American actor, Omar Epps (b. 1973).

Source

  1. http://www.behindthename.com/php/search.php?nmd=n&terms=Omar
  2. http://www.askoxford.com/firstnames/omar

Edna

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Biblical Hebrew
Meaning: “pleasure.”

The name is found throughout the Old Testament as the name of several female personages. Most notably, it is found in the Apocryphal Book of Jubilees in which it is mentioned that it is the name of the wives of Enoch, Methuseleh and Terah.

The name appears again as the name of the wife of Tobit.

Edna was fairly common in the early 20th-century in both the United States and in Northern Europe, but has fallen out of usage since. In 1899, Edna was the 11th most popular female name in the United States.

In fact, before the 18th-century, the name was seldom used outside the Jewish community, but since the Protestant Reformation, the name experienced a vogue in predominately Protestant countries.

Edna shares an etymological relation with the Hebrew word, eden (paradise).

The Irish female name, Eithne, has often been anglicized to Edna.

As of 2010, Edna was the 67th most popular female name in Bosnia & Herzegovina.

In Latvia the designated name-day is July 5.

Sources

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edna_(given_name)
  2. http://www.behindthename.com/php/search.php?nmd=n&terms=Edna&submit=Go
  3. http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/E/EDNA/
  4. http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://freepages.religions.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~luijkenaar/adam/img/edna.jpg&imgrefurl=http://freepages.religions.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~luijkenaar/adam/enoc_edna.html&usg=__irzvCMRy8iIryby4cYCh69s0Kpg=&h=720&w=576&sz=67&hl=en&start=19&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=qmG_vhr19Eb6bM:&tbnh=140&tbnw=112&prev=/images%3Fq%3DEdna%2B(Bible)%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Doff%26sa%3DN%26tbs%3Disch:1

Malik

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Arabic ملك
Meaning: “king.”
(MAH-LEEK)

The name is derived from the Arabic word ملك (malik) meaning, “king, chieftain.”

The same word appears in several Semitic languages, including Hebrew, in the form of Melek מֶלֶך. In the Old Testament, Melech is the name of a son of Micah.

In the Arabic-speaking world, this is the general term used to refer to a king or chieftain. It also a common male name among both Muslims and Middle Eastern Christians, usually used in reference to the term Al-Malik which means, “the king” an epithet for God among both Muslims and Christians.

The word also appears in the Armenian language in the form of Melik Մելիկ, which is also used a masculine given name, often shortened to Melo.

As of 2010, Malik was the 99th most popular male name in Bosnia & Herzegovina, (2010). His rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 283 (United States, 2010)
  • # 296 (France, 2009)

A feminine form is Malika.

Anna, Anne

Gender: Feminine
Origin: Biblical Hebrew
Meaning: “grace.”
(ANN; AHN). (ANN-uh; AHN-nah). (HANN-uh; HAHN-nah)

Anne is possibly one of the quintessential classic English and French female names. Prior to the 18th-century, it seems that every other girl born in England was either named Anne, Jane or Mary. There were several British and French queens who bore this simplistic moniker, including the ill fated Anne Boleyn, the mother of Elizabeth I. The history of Anne is rather long and complicated.

It was foremost popularized through the cult of St. Anne, a legendary figure who was said to be the mother of the Virgin Mary and the grandmother of Christ.

In Brittany, the name became especially popular because it happened to coincide with the name of an ancient Celtic goddess, her cult being replaced by St. Anne’s. In fact, it was borne by one Breton Princess, Anne of Brittany.

The name was introduced into Britain by the French-Normans after the invasion in 1066. Previously, there had been a minor Saxon king named Anna, but in this case the name is related to the Saxon arn (eagle). Anna and Anne are still occasionally used as male given names in Friesland.

Other than the apocryphal saint, the name Anne can be traced directly back to the Bible. In the New Testament, it is the name of a prophetess who predicts the Crucifixion of Christ.

Anna (Αννα), is the Greek translation of the early Hebrew Channah חַנָּה, usually transliterated as Hannah, meaning “grace.”

Hannah is borne in the Old Testament by the faithful mother of the prophet, Samuel.

Hannah has always been popular among Jewish families, but was virtually unheard of among non-Jews before the Reformation, except in some cases where it may have been used as a diminutive form of Johanna, spelled Hanna.

It was the Byzantines who had introduced the Anna form to the world, making it popular throughout Eastern and Southern Europe. It was a very popular name among the Byzantine royal family and it was borne by the majestic Anna of Byzantium.

Anna may be the more melodic form of the bunch, but Anne’s minimalistic qualities are charming. Short, to the point, no frills. It’s not a bad name, though it does lack some spice, which is why parents are probably more attracted to its more exotic alternatives. In fact, Anne only comes in at # 608 in the top 1000 female names of the United States. It is safe to say, however, that she is very much loved in the middle name spot.

Anna is currently one of the most popular female names in Europe and abroad. Her rankings are as follows:

  • # 1 (Austria, 2010)
  • # 1 (Estonia, 2011)
  • # 2 (Hungary, 2010)
  • # 3 (Ana, Georgia, 2010)
  • # 3 (Iceland, 2010)
  • # 4 (Ana, Croatia, 2010)
  • # 4 (Czech Republic, 2010)
  • # 4 (Germany, 2011)
  • # 4 (Ukraine, 2010)
  • # 5 (Faroe Islands, 2010)
  • # 5 (Ana, Portugal, 2010)
  • # 6 (Armenia, 2010)
  • # 6 (Ane, Greenland, 2002-2003)
  • # 6 (Ana, Romania, 2009)
  • # 6 (Ana, Serbia, 2010)
  • # 7 (Latvia, 2011)
  • # 7 (Russia, 2011)
  • # 8 (German-speaking Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 9 (Denmark, 2011)
  • # 10 (Netherlands, 2010)
  • # 10 (Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 10 (Norway, 2010)
  • # 11 (Italy, 2010)
  • # 12 (Ireland, 2010)
  • # 14 (Poland, 2010)
  • # 16 (Catalonia, 2010)
  • # 26 (Canada, B.C., 2010)
  • # 28 (Italian-speaking Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 28 (United States, 2010)
  • # 29 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 40 (France, 2009)
  • # 46 (French-speaking Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 53 (Belgium, 2009)
  • # 63 (England/Wales, 2010)
  • # 71 (Australia, 2010)
  • # 81 (Sweden, 2010)
  • # 83 (Spain, 2010)
Other forms of the name include:
  • Anneen (Afrikaans/Low German)
  • Anna Анна (Afrikaans/Albanian/Armenian/Breton/Bulgarian/Catalan/Corsican/Czech/Dutch/English/Estonian/Faroese/Finnish/French/Frisian/German/Greek/Hungarian/Icelandic/Italian/Latvian/Limburgish/Maltese/Polish/Russian/Ukrainian/Scandinavian/Slovak)
  • Anne (Basque/Dutch/English/French/Scandinavian)
  • Gánna Га́нна (Belarusian)
  • Annaig (Breton)
  • Annick (Breton)
  • Maina (Breton)
  • Mannaig (Breton)
  • Mannick (Breton)
  • Naig (Breton)
  • Ana Ана ანა (Bulgarian/Croatian/Galician/Georgian/Lombard/Macedonian/Portuguese/Romanian/Samogaitian/Serbian/Slovene/Spanish/Venetian)
  • Jana (Croatian/Ladino)
  • Aneta (Czech/Polish/Samogaitian/Slovak)
  • Aina (Catalan)
  • Anica (Croatian/Serbian/Slovene)
  • Ane (Danish)
  • Anika (Danish)
  • Anneke (Dutch)
  • Anneken (Dutch)
  • Annika (Dutch/Finnish/German/Latvian/Scandinavian)
  • Anka (Dutch/Frisian/German)
  • An(n)ke (Dutch/Frisian)
  • Anouk (Dutch/French)
  • Ans (Dutch)
  • Enneke (Dutch)
  • Enneken (Dutch)
  • Anita (English/German/Polish/Spanish)
  • Annette (English/French/German)
  • Anissa (English)
  • Annelle/Annella (Estonian)
  • Anete (Estonian/Latvian)
  • Anett (Estonian)
  • Anu (Estonian)
  • Anni (Finnish)
  • Annikki (Finnish)
  • Anniina (Finnish)
  • Annukka (Finnish)
  • Niina (Finnish)
  • Anaïs (French/Provençal)
  • Annouche (French)
  • Ninette (French)
  • Ninon (French)
  • Ninouk (French)
  • Anje (Frisian)
  • Ankea (Frisian)
  • Antje (Frisian)
  • Antjen (Frisian)
  • Anute (Fruilian)
  • Anano (Georgian)
  • Annchen (German)
  • Annel (German)
  • Annele (German/Latvian)
  • Anneli(e) (German/Finnish/Swedish)
  • Annet (German)
  • Anina (German)
  • Anja (German/Slovene)
  • Anouschka (German/Italian/Russian)
  • Annaki (Greek)
  • Annoula (Greek)
  • Noula (Greek)
  • Anikó (Hungarian)
  • Annuska (Hungarian)
  • Panni (Hungarian)
  • Áine (Irish)
  • Ánna (Irish)
  • Annarella (Italian)
  • Annella (Italian)
  • Annetta (Italian)
  • Annettina (Italian)
  • Nona (Italian/Romansch)
  • Ance (Latvian)
  • Annija (Latvian)
  • Anninya (Latvian)
  • Ona (Lithuanian)
  • Annamma (Malayalam)
  • Annam (Malayalam)
  • Onnee (Manx)
  • Âone (Norman)
  • Aenna/Aenne (Old High German)
  • Annehe (Old High German)
  • Änna/Änne (Old High German)
  • Neta (Piedmontese)
  • Noto (Piedmontese)
  • Anke (Plattdeutsch)
  • Anneke(n) (Plattdeutsch)
  • Analia (Romansch/Spanish)
  • Annina (Romansch)
  • Annotta (Romansch)
  • Anca (Romanian)
  • Anicuta (Romanian)
  • Anėta (Samogaitian)
  • Anėkė (Samogaitian)
  • Annag (Scottish)
  • Ghianna (Sicilian)
  • Janna (Sicilian)
  • Nanna (Sicilian)
  • Anniken (Swedish)
  • Ann (Welsh)
  • Nan (Welsh)
  • Nanno (Welsh)
  • Nanw (Welsh)
  • Aana (Wolof)
As for the Hannah forms

Hanna without an H is the prefered form on Continental Europe, usually pronounced (HAHN-nah) and in French like Anna. Hanna and Hanne (HAHN-neh) are also used as diminutive forms of Johanna/Johanne in the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Germany. There is the Hungarian Hajna pronounced (HOY-no). The Czech/Slovak form of Hana nickname Hanka. There are the Yiddish forms of Heyna, Hayna, Hejna (all pronounced like HAY-nah) including the diminutive forms of HenaHende, Hendel and Henye.  The Polish diminutive form of Hania, which might make an interesting alternative to Anya or Hannah. Hannah, Hanna and Henna are all used in the Middle East.

Of course, how could we ever forget the popular diminutive forms of Annie and Nan.

Joel

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Biblical Hebrew יוֹאֵל 
Meaning: “Yahweh is God.”
Eng (JOLE); Fre (zhoh-EL); Germ (YOH-el)

The name is derived from the Hebrew male name, Yo’el  (יוֹאֵל), meaning, “Yahweh is God.” The name is borne in the Old Testament by a minor prophet.

Currently, Joel is the 14th most popular male name in German-speaking, Switzerland, (2010). And his rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 20 (Catalonia, 2010)
  • # 33 (Finland, 2010)
  • # 39 (Gioele, Italian-speaking, Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 46 (Germany, 2011)
  • # 50 (Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 58 (Spain, 2010)
  • # 59 (Sweden, 2010)
  • # 79 (New Zealand, 2010)
  • # 81 (England/Wales, 2010)
  • # 99 (Australia, 2010)
  • # 132 (United States, 2010)
  • # 152 (Netherlands, 2010)
  • # 161 (Scotland, 2010)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Joel (Catalan/English/Finnish/Polish/Portuguese/Romansch/Scandinavian/Spanish)
  • Joël (Dutch/German/French)
  • Yo’el יוֹאֵל (Hebrew)
  • Gioele (Italian)
A French feminine form is Joëlle.

Noah

Gender: Masculine
Origin: Biblical Hebrew נוֹחַ 
Meaning: “rest; comfort.”
Eng (NOH-ah)

The name is derived from the Hebrew male name נוֹחַ (Noach) which can either be from the Hebrew (nāḥam) meaning “comfort” or (nûaḥ) meaning, “rest.”

It borne in the Old Testament (Genesis) by the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family and the animal species to survive the Great Flood. The same story also appears in the Qu’ran. In Islam, Nuh (Noah) is revered as a prophet.

The story of Noah’s Ark was extremely popular in Medieval Europe and he was even revered as a saint by the Catholic Church, but Noah itself never caught on as a given name until after the Protestant Reformation, when it became extremely popular among the Puritans. It fell out of usage between the 19th-century up until recently, where it is now one of the most popular male names in the Western World.

Its recent boom in popularity is a mystery. It is currently the most popular male name in German-speaking Switzerland (2010) and Belgium (2009), and his rankings in other countries are as follows:

  • # 2 (Nojus, Lithuanian, 2010)
  • # 3 (Denmark, 2011)
  • # 3 (French-speaking Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 5 (Nóa Faroe Islands, 2010)
  • # 7 (United States, 2010)
  • # 8 (Australia, 2010)
  • # 9 (Canada, B.C., 2010)
  • # 11 (Germany, 2011)
  • # 11 (Northern Ireland, 2010)
  • # 11 (Norway, 2010)
  • # 12 (New Zealand, 2010)
  • # 14 (France, 2009)
  • # 18 (England/Wales, 2010)
  • # 21 (Netherlands, 2010)
  • # 23 (Italian-speaking Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 25 (Sweden, 2010)
  • # 26 (Ireland, 2010)
  • # 27 (Austria, 2010)
  • # 32 (Noé, French-speaking Switzerland, 2010)
  • # 32 (Noé France, 2009)
  • # 41 (Scotland, 2010)
  • # 99 (Noé, Belgium, 2009)
  • # 534 (Noé, United States, 2010)

Other forms of the name include:

  • Noah (Albanian/Czech/Dutch/English/French/German/Italian/Scandinavian)
  • Nuh  نوح (Arabic/Azeri/Bosnian/Chechen/Chuvash/Coptic/Ethiopian/Indonesian/Javanese/Kazakh/ Kyrgyz/Tatar/Turkmen/Turkish/Uzbek)
  • Noy Նոյ (Armenian)
  • Noj Ной (Belarusian/Bulgarian/Russian/Ukrainian)
  • Noe ნოე Ное (Bosnian/Czech/Georgian/Macedonian/Polish/Romanian/RomanschSerbian/Slovak/Slovene)
  • Noè (Catalan/Italian)
  • Noa (Croatian/Estonian)
  • Noach (Dutch)
  • Nóa (Faroese)
  • Nooa (Finnish)
  • Noé Νωέ (French/Galician/Greek/Hungarian/Portuguese/Romansch/Spanish)
  • Noach נוֹחַ (Hebrew)
  • Nói (Icelandic)
  • Nûh (Kurdish)
  • Noë (Latin)
  • Noahas (Lithuanian)
  • Nojus (Lithuanian)
  • Noje Ноје (Serbian)
  • Nuux (Somali)
  • Noak (Swedish)
The name Noah also appears in the Book of Mormon as the name of an evil Nephite king who burned the prophet Abinadi at the stake.
An obscure French feminine form is Noée.